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Downsized in 2005 from a midsize daily newspaper in the Midwest and on the run from a soon-to-be ex-wife, intrepid webmaster Paul Malinski transforms into kpaul. His goal is to start a news and information source from the ground up, something truly by the people and for the people. On his journey, he learns a lot about journalism, greed, love, black holes, Occupy Wall Stre Downsized in 2005 from a midsize daily newspaper in the Midwest and on the run from a soon-to-be ex-wife, intrepid webmaster Paul Malinski transforms into kpaul. His goal is to start a news and information source from the ground up, something truly by the people and for the people. On his journey, he learns a lot about journalism, greed, love, black holes, Occupy Wall Street, robots and automation, poetry, selflessness, mental illness and much more. Perhaps most important, he learns about himself and that one person alone can't do everything. This is an autobiographical novel, a work of fiction that describes the continued decline of big media and the rise of "citizen journalism" as seen through the eyes of a man who believes that Journalism is much too important to leave to large corporations. Section A - Hyperlocal News / Obits Chapter A1 - So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish Wrap! Chapter A2 - Redbud is my Rosebud Chapter A3 - Tell me. Is the Lord of the Blogosphere in? Section B - Politics / Lifestyle / Money Chapter B4 - Presidential Deliverance from Underwear Chapter B5 - Ex-Mas Eve Under the Lilith Tree Chapter B6 - Babylon's Richest Man Until the End of the Chapter Section C - National / World News Chapter C7 - Period comma exclamation point Chapter C8 - Hastily created Believeland Tourism Video Chapter C9 - Die Lethal with a Hard Weapon Section D - Arts / Opinion / Editorial Chapter D10 - Whiner, Whiner, Chicken Diner Chapter D11 - Blue Journalist Needs Food Badly! Chapter D12 - Quantum Entanglement/Journalism Engagement


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Downsized in 2005 from a midsize daily newspaper in the Midwest and on the run from a soon-to-be ex-wife, intrepid webmaster Paul Malinski transforms into kpaul. His goal is to start a news and information source from the ground up, something truly by the people and for the people. On his journey, he learns a lot about journalism, greed, love, black holes, Occupy Wall Stre Downsized in 2005 from a midsize daily newspaper in the Midwest and on the run from a soon-to-be ex-wife, intrepid webmaster Paul Malinski transforms into kpaul. His goal is to start a news and information source from the ground up, something truly by the people and for the people. On his journey, he learns a lot about journalism, greed, love, black holes, Occupy Wall Street, robots and automation, poetry, selflessness, mental illness and much more. Perhaps most important, he learns about himself and that one person alone can't do everything. This is an autobiographical novel, a work of fiction that describes the continued decline of big media and the rise of "citizen journalism" as seen through the eyes of a man who believes that Journalism is much too important to leave to large corporations. Section A - Hyperlocal News / Obits Chapter A1 - So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish Wrap! Chapter A2 - Redbud is my Rosebud Chapter A3 - Tell me. Is the Lord of the Blogosphere in? Section B - Politics / Lifestyle / Money Chapter B4 - Presidential Deliverance from Underwear Chapter B5 - Ex-Mas Eve Under the Lilith Tree Chapter B6 - Babylon's Richest Man Until the End of the Chapter Section C - National / World News Chapter C7 - Period comma exclamation point Chapter C8 - Hastily created Believeland Tourism Video Chapter C9 - Die Lethal with a Hard Weapon Section D - Arts / Opinion / Editorial Chapter D10 - Whiner, Whiner, Chicken Diner Chapter D11 - Blue Journalist Needs Food Badly! Chapter D12 - Quantum Entanglement/Journalism Engagement

35 review for kNewspapers: A Novel About Love and Citizen Journalism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Schweitzer

    I received a copy of this book for review from Goodreads First Reads program. This book has a lot of potential and some good moments, but it needed revision. In the beginning of the novel, I sympathized with the main character and wanted him to succeed. As a journalist who has experienced the cutbacks of the digital era myself, I identified with a lot of his goals. As someone who runs a blog, I also identified with his web start-up stories. However, there were a lot of things going on that made me I received a copy of this book for review from Goodreads First Reads program. This book has a lot of potential and some good moments, but it needed revision. In the beginning of the novel, I sympathized with the main character and wanted him to succeed. As a journalist who has experienced the cutbacks of the digital era myself, I identified with a lot of his goals. As someone who runs a blog, I also identified with his web start-up stories. However, there were a lot of things going on that made me lose interest and muddled up an otherwise good story The author struggled with having too many ideas for one novel. The poetry and “daydream” sequences interrupted story. The poetry didn’t do anything to move the plot forward or build my understanding of the character. The daydream sequences mimicked a “choose your own adventure” type novel, but not successfully. In them, we see what might have happened if the main character had chosen a different path. Well, we see what might have happened in a world run by a writer’s wild imagination. They just made a long book longer. The writing felt very hands off. It was showing rather than telling, as if the writer was reporting rather than telling a story. When the did a good job of showing us what happened, the author turned around and told us too rather than trusting the reader to understand. The style was simple and readable, but too littered with cliches to be engaging. Some of the cliches aren’t even used properly. In one place our main character says he “drove to Ohio like a banshee.” Banshees scream when someone dies. It’s a horrible scream. I have no idea how they drive though. The characterization of the main character was well done, but the secondary characters fell flat. No one had any dimension, but the female characters in particular served either as objects of affection or tormentors, which made the story too one-sided and predictable. (This is a side note, but I can’t think of an instance that would allow this book to pass the Bechdel test). Another distracting issue was the naming. Sometimes the author changed the names of celebrities and websites in distracting yet obvious ways. Other times, he didn’t so it wasn't even consistent. Also, the character names weren’t great. Brenda and Brandee are too similar and confusing when both mentioned near each other. Brenda has twins named Mike and Ike. They needed better names. This pulled me out of the narrative every single time, and I was already struggling to stay with it at that point. The passage of time didn’t read well. At one point the main character mentions that two years had passed. I would have guess six to nine months had gone by. Another time I thought a year or two had passed, but it seemed only a little time had actually gone by. Also, the pacing needs, work. The book got very slow in places. I liked the quick hit stories that occurred when the main character was building his business, but some of the relationship sections dragged. Overall, the plot needed focus and the book needs editing. I still think the core story was a good idea that just needed more time and work.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K.

    This book is fun and well-constructed and thought out. Especially the poetry is beautiful and enjoyable, also the parts in which the author has the humility to write about what is really going on, the early "Brandee" parts. This might well be a textbook of sorts for future generations of journalists. The plot: Journalism is dying and/or changing due to the onslaught of new forms of media. The main character of this novel, an alter ego to the real kPaul, I presume, is taking on the dinosaur corp This book is fun and well-constructed and thought out. Especially the poetry is beautiful and enjoyable, also the parts in which the author has the humility to write about what is really going on, the early "Brandee" parts. This might well be a textbook of sorts for future generations of journalists. The plot: Journalism is dying and/or changing due to the onslaught of new forms of media. The main character of this novel, an alter ego to the real kPaul, I presume, is taking on the dinosaur corporate American news apparatus, which is struggling with sagging numbers, overstressed employees and runaway readers. But when there is no longer a newspaper to turn to, where can distraught citizens go to report certain forms of abuse? kPaul hopes to build an online grassroots citizen journalism haven after he is let go by a large Indiana newspaper. The negatives: a little shocking is the utter lack of privacy between author and reader. Some details were just way too intimate for my taste. Then, the author often leads the reader out of the primary storyline into strange subplots, possible futures that then turn out to have been a fantasy, a fantasy of the millionaire win-the-lottery, climb-in-a-spaceship and just go variety. Particularly infuriating were the problems with women, especially Brandee, who in the book has three children. I did not quite understand why the main character had to bombard a single mother with countless texts and messages. She was surely exhausted. The great positives: I do understand citizen journalism better now. kNewspapers as a novel is a monumental effort, and it is very well done, but at times I felt the author was holding me hostage. If he had told a straight story about Lynda, Brandee and his freepress websites, I would have gladly given a 5-star rave review. The Lynda story alone would have been a great book (sans the self-sabotage details). My idea of a citizen journalist had always been an L.A. tourist who snaps a picture of a drunk celeb and sends it to the National Enquirer. I could not understand the million-dollar websites running strange articles, picking up the scraps MSM left the contributors to work with. I will always remember this book, but in my opinion to be a novelist, one must write with one's heart's blood, and kPaul is a great writer, he should just learn to treat himself with more respect.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Douglas

    I'll be brutally honest here. I'm not sure whether I liked this book. There were times when I felt like I did but there were also times when I really didn't. The story tells of kPaul and his endeavours to change journalism.The book is split into several endings so it does feel a bit disjointed

  4. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cozmo Dogfart

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Scaggs

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Zitsch

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tami Shephard

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie Hutchinson

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  13. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Read

  15. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen Supinger

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

  20. 5 out of 5

    vicks

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Flores

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tami Montano

  25. 5 out of 5

    cheryl

  26. 4 out of 5

    Max

  27. 4 out of 5

    Darcee Kraus

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer C

  29. 4 out of 5

    JoAnn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Delgado

  31. 4 out of 5

    Mary Peterson

  32. 4 out of 5

    Aya

  33. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Knight

  34. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  35. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria Matson

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