counter create hit Lockdown - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Lockdown

Availability: Ready to download

No good deed goes unpunished, or so the philosophers suggest. Samuel Rochez did a very good deed and therefore is considered a traitor by the whole human race. Throughout the galaxy he is remembered as the Benedict Arnold of his time. Only in Samuel's case the humans lost the war, and he is reviled as the one ultimately responsible. For a time he manages to live in anonymi No good deed goes unpunished, or so the philosophers suggest. Samuel Rochez did a very good deed and therefore is considered a traitor by the whole human race. Throughout the galaxy he is remembered as the Benedict Arnold of his time. Only in Samuel's case the humans lost the war, and he is reviled as the one ultimately responsible. For a time he manages to live in anonymity. Upon his discovery he is forced to join a mercenary band on what is supposed to be a simple in and out adventure mission. Soon he finds himself at odds with the band, running for his life, and striving to save the planet and its unusual life forms from destruction. This is a first contact that can doom an entire planet of hive mind aliens. When the planet is placed in lockdown, making the entire world seem claustrophobic. The military band's only hope for escape is to set off the biggest bomb in the history of the galaxy and destroy all aliens on the planet.


Compare
Ads Banner

No good deed goes unpunished, or so the philosophers suggest. Samuel Rochez did a very good deed and therefore is considered a traitor by the whole human race. Throughout the galaxy he is remembered as the Benedict Arnold of his time. Only in Samuel's case the humans lost the war, and he is reviled as the one ultimately responsible. For a time he manages to live in anonymi No good deed goes unpunished, or so the philosophers suggest. Samuel Rochez did a very good deed and therefore is considered a traitor by the whole human race. Throughout the galaxy he is remembered as the Benedict Arnold of his time. Only in Samuel's case the humans lost the war, and he is reviled as the one ultimately responsible. For a time he manages to live in anonymity. Upon his discovery he is forced to join a mercenary band on what is supposed to be a simple in and out adventure mission. Soon he finds himself at odds with the band, running for his life, and striving to save the planet and its unusual life forms from destruction. This is a first contact that can doom an entire planet of hive mind aliens. When the planet is placed in lockdown, making the entire world seem claustrophobic. The military band's only hope for escape is to set off the biggest bomb in the history of the galaxy and destroy all aliens on the planet.

42 review for Lockdown

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nik

    If nobody (including Tim!) minds, this is the review that I originally posted on Amazon. As I mention, although I've never met Tim personally I've read quite a lot of his short fiction through the SF/Fantasy/Alternative fiction website 'Quantum Muse' so I already had some idea about the story before coming to this. Anyhow, hope anyone not familiar with the 'Lockdown' or Tim's earlier fiction finds the review useful. Best, N Lockdown by Timothy O. Goyette Set in a far distant future in which the essen If nobody (including Tim!) minds, this is the review that I originally posted on Amazon. As I mention, although I've never met Tim personally I've read quite a lot of his short fiction through the SF/Fantasy/Alternative fiction website 'Quantum Muse' so I already had some idea about the story before coming to this. Anyhow, hope anyone not familiar with the 'Lockdown' or Tim's earlier fiction finds the review useful. Best, N Lockdown by Timothy O. Goyette Set in a far distant future in which the essential qualities which make us human (the bad and the good) have changed little, but in which the scramble for the colonization of the stars has developed exponentially, Goyette's Lockdown is a novel of high adventure that evokes something of that great tradition of fiction that, from the 19th century onwards, focused on the physical and moral challenges that come with the discovery and exploration of the uncharted. The novel opens to find a humanity that had been exhausted by a brutal and protracted intergalactic conflict with an alien civilization, the Loscar, to whom the descendants of Earth have been forced to concede total defeat. It soon becomes clear that not only has humanity been defeated militarily and financially, but also morally - and all to no purpose. It is in this bleak context that we find a veteran of this war, Samuel Rochez, huddled in among a mass of colonists on a bitterly freezing colonial outpost. Rochez, as we soon discover, is a man of considerable physical and intellectual resources, but he is also someone who has achieved notoriety for an act of moral courage that many refuse to accept as anything but treason. Cold and alone, hunted and fast running out of options, Rochez is forced to reluctantly accept a post with a crew of 'Independent forces ... the euphemism for Mercenaries' and it is from this point on that the story proper begins. Rochez finds himself in the employ of a paramilitary band of privateers who are prospecting beyond the fringes of the known galaxy for Carlinium, a precious crystalline substance that is the primary energy source in the universe. Their search leads them to a previously unknown planet, which is rich in deposits of Carlinium but also, it transpires, the home world of a superintelligent and telepathic life-form who call themselves the 'Home-kind'. It is not long before Rochez finds his moral courage tested once more by the rapaciousness of the 'Independent forces' he has now found himself amongst ... . While it is clearly possible from this plot to draw parallels between Lockdown and recent events in our own life and times, especially with respect to the politics surrounding the exploration for and exploitation of oil, this novel successfully pits the fiercely moral and independent will of the hero, Rochez, against a series of increasingly complex challenges and it is these ethical conflicts that provide much of the tension in the story. That is not to say that the novel does not also imaginatively realise alien worlds in a far off future. The biology, life and culture of the Homekind, and indeed their home planet, have been thought out in no small amount of detail as have a number of the technological innovations and inventions that the interstellar privateers have at their disposal and it is worth reading the novel for these alone. As a member of the peer-review fiction website, Quantum Muse, I have previously had the pleasure of reading a number of Goyette's short fiction but this (as far as I know) is his first novel. For me, this was a good, fun read, rich in action and with a clear moral view. I hope you enjoy it too.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre

    This was a well-written sci-fi adventure that draws you in by making the protagonist immediately likeable, and keeps you involved through action and character development. I'm looking forward to reading more by this author. * I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads. Thank you to Goodreads and Timothy O. Goyette.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Small press pulpish SF adventure turns out to be an entertaining read with vivid characters. Takes a bit to get going to the main story, but once there conflicts abound with aliens (actually, it's their world) who bring a different mindset to the proceedings. Worth a look.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nobody Loser

    Lockdown begins in a confusing runaround. Who is Samuel and where is he going? He's definitely someone that is being searched for and everyone seems to know his name, but why? Why is the pace so quick in this part of the story? Is the whole read going to be like this? The questions will keep running through your mind, but you won't stop asking them and you won't put it down until you get some answers. Samuel is literally running and hiding for his life. He's a so-called "traitor" to his own kind Lockdown begins in a confusing runaround. Who is Samuel and where is he going? He's definitely someone that is being searched for and everyone seems to know his name, but why? Why is the pace so quick in this part of the story? Is the whole read going to be like this? The questions will keep running through your mind, but you won't stop asking them and you won't put it down until you get some answers. Samuel is literally running and hiding for his life. He's a so-called "traitor" to his own kind. His sense of compassion for the suffering, however, won't allow him to leave an elderly woman dying on a stoop and thus, to get her to safety, he must expose himself. After that, his whole life comes crashing down. What else could he do but sell his precious Human Forces Medal of Honor to escape the mess he's in? So that's just what he does. Down the road, the book slows down a bit, we are introduced to new human and alien personalities, some of which make the story what it is and it takes a somewhat different turn. The worst possible thing I could say about Lockdown is that somewhere in the middle, I did start putting it down more because it got a little slower. I guess I was a bit irritated with the alien life in this story as well. I specifically remember being upset that the story had taken the turn it did and thought it would remain on that course, but I'm happy to say it didn't. Actually, if it hadn't taken the slow turn, the end might have been quite a bit less explosive. At some point we are introduced, in more depth, to a man who is just about the opposite of Samuel. He's big, he's a brute, and he's terrible; at any rate, Lance is a bit of a sociopath. Beyond the center, my thirst for a return to the action was quickly quenched. I was very impressed with the resourcefulness of a major character, the determination and compassion of our hero and the hatred and destructive mindset of our villain. I can easily say it's a three-and-a-half to four-star read and I would Give Timothy O. Goyette another go any day. Don't forget to check out his webzine, Quantum Muse; it critiques short works and art. http://www.fanboysanonymous.com/2013/...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This novel is about a man who did a considerate thing, and is paying for it, big time. The good thing that Samuel Rochez did was to keep a bomb from exploding, that would have killed many aliens called the Loscar. Unfortunately, humanity was at war with the Loscar at the time, a war that humanity eventually lost. Rochez is universally reviled as the person who was responsible for humanity's defeat. His attempts to live in anonymity don't last very long. Rochez is forced to join a band of mercenari This novel is about a man who did a considerate thing, and is paying for it, big time. The good thing that Samuel Rochez did was to keep a bomb from exploding, that would have killed many aliens called the Loscar. Unfortunately, humanity was at war with the Loscar at the time, a war that humanity eventually lost. Rochez is universally reviled as the person who was responsible for humanity's defeat. His attempts to live in anonymity don't last very long. Rochez is forced to join a band of mercenaries traveling to another planet looking for Carlinium, the rarest mineral in the galaxy. It is supposed to be a very simple operation, paving the way for the industrial mining equipment that will come later. Rochez discovers that the planet is inhabited by very friendly flying creatures that communicate by telepathy. There is little, or no, fear of strangers. Rochez undertakes a long-distance journey with Jawell, one of the natives, to attempt to convince them that the rest of the humans mean to do them, and their planet, a great deal of harm. Along the way, the natives have a more urgent problem. Imagine a herd of stampeding buffalo heading right for your village. What, if anything, can be done about it? Meantime, back at the ship, a major complication occurs when the Loscar visit the planet, and put it under lock and key. There is no leaving the planet without the Loscar knowing about it. A mutiny is staged because the Captain is supposedly too moderate with the natives. Rochez is re-captured, and a plan is put together to create a way to leave the planet secretly, a plan which involves a nuclear warhead which may destroy part of the planet. Can Rochez keep the home world of the natives from being destroyed? This is a strong, well-done piece of storytelling. Parts of it might seem preachy or predictable, but it is still well worth reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jack Byrd

    Well, this is hard to explain. I'm one of those people when I don't like a book at all, I'll still finish it. But this one wasn't really that I didn't like it, it was that this was not my type of book. For one, I didn't think the plot was very stable. It was kinda wavering, and in the beginning it didn't make much since. I feel like had I been into this genre of book, I would have liked this one a really good amount. But, I'm more into Young Adult/Fantasy genre, and this genre was just too sci-f Well, this is hard to explain. I'm one of those people when I don't like a book at all, I'll still finish it. But this one wasn't really that I didn't like it, it was that this was not my type of book. For one, I didn't think the plot was very stable. It was kinda wavering, and in the beginning it didn't make much since. I feel like had I been into this genre of book, I would have liked this one a really good amount. But, I'm more into Young Adult/Fantasy genre, and this genre was just too sci-fy for me. To people who like this genre, go ahead. Try it out. But for me, it just didn't do it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Wilson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen Lawler

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura Dobb

  14. 4 out of 5

    Neal Nederhoff

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  16. 5 out of 5

    M.J.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vikki Sanderson

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle & Tony

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret scotland

  22. 5 out of 5

    Miriah Isel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brett Axel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kyla

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patti

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diana Senn

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

  32. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  33. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  34. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  35. 5 out of 5

    Edward Pissmeoff

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ira

  37. 4 out of 5

    Rhona Minton

  38. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  39. 5 out of 5

    Richard Tyler

  40. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  41. 5 out of 5

    Sally

  42. 5 out of 5

    Amber

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.