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Maria Augusta was sent as a young novice to look after the large family of the widowed Baron von Trapp. She brought with her little besides her guitar and the gift of happiness. With zest inherited from her native Tyrol, she quickly transformed the gloomy restraint of the house outside Salzburg into a place of bubbling musical activity centred round the festivals of the ch Maria Augusta was sent as a young novice to look after the large family of the widowed Baron von Trapp. She brought with her little besides her guitar and the gift of happiness. With zest inherited from her native Tyrol, she quickly transformed the gloomy restraint of the house outside Salzburg into a place of bubbling musical activity centred round the festivals of the church year. The children became her close friends, and when the Baron fell in love with her she married him with the blessing of the convent. Maria von Trapp’s optimism and determination carried the family through many trials. When their fortunes crashed, the musical training she had given the children enabled them to earn their living on the concert platform. After a miraculous escape from Nazi-occupied Germany, she led them to the start of a new and outstandingly successful life in the U.S.A. But above all, this wonderful true story which gave rise to the musical, The Sound of Music and the film, The Trapp Family - is one of a close-knit family whose happiness and success were based on a joyous foundation of faith.


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Maria Augusta was sent as a young novice to look after the large family of the widowed Baron von Trapp. She brought with her little besides her guitar and the gift of happiness. With zest inherited from her native Tyrol, she quickly transformed the gloomy restraint of the house outside Salzburg into a place of bubbling musical activity centred round the festivals of the ch Maria Augusta was sent as a young novice to look after the large family of the widowed Baron von Trapp. She brought with her little besides her guitar and the gift of happiness. With zest inherited from her native Tyrol, she quickly transformed the gloomy restraint of the house outside Salzburg into a place of bubbling musical activity centred round the festivals of the church year. The children became her close friends, and when the Baron fell in love with her she married him with the blessing of the convent. Maria von Trapp’s optimism and determination carried the family through many trials. When their fortunes crashed, the musical training she had given the children enabled them to earn their living on the concert platform. After a miraculous escape from Nazi-occupied Germany, she led them to the start of a new and outstandingly successful life in the U.S.A. But above all, this wonderful true story which gave rise to the musical, The Sound of Music and the film, The Trapp Family - is one of a close-knit family whose happiness and success were based on a joyous foundation of faith.

30 review for The Sound of Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp With nearly 1,500 Broadway performances, six Tony Awards, more than three million albums sold, and five Academy Awards, The Sound of Music, based on the lives of Maria, the baron, and their singing children, is as familiar to most of us as our own family history. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز پانزدهم ماه دسامبر سال 2002 میلادی داستان اشکها و لبخندها از روی داستان زندگی خانواده همین خانواده تراپ ساخته شده است. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane in Australia

    Remember the movie The Sound of Music? Well, this book was written by the real Maria von Trapp, about their real life ... not what you saw in the movie. Regarding the movie, her youngest son, Johannes, said, "This was the Hollywood version, of the Broadway version, of the German film version, of the book that my mother wrote." That sums it up quite nicely! So many things were changed, added, or omitted, that the movie barely resembles the real story. I won't go into all the differences, but they Remember the movie The Sound of Music? Well, this book was written by the real Maria von Trapp, about their real life ... not what you saw in the movie. Regarding the movie, her youngest son, Johannes, said, "This was the Hollywood version, of the Broadway version, of the German film version, of the book that my mother wrote." That sums it up quite nicely! So many things were changed, added, or omitted, that the movie barely resembles the real story. I won't go into all the differences, but they were numerous. Since I enjoy nonfiction much more than fiction, this book hit the spot for me. I enjoyed reading about what really happened, instead of watching Hollywood's fictional creation. I thought Maria told their story in a very pleasant, friendly, and interesting manner. It was intriguing to see how moving to America affected them, as I'm sure it was quite a cultural shock. Learning of all the things they did, in addition to singing, was nice, too. I'll say one thing ... she has more energy in her little finger, than I have in my entire body! That goes for all the other family members, too! If you have an interest in the famous movie, or the von Trapp family, you will enjoy this book. As most of you know, they were a Catholic family, and she does share how their faith impacted their lives, at different points along the way. She's not overbearing with it, just slips it in there. So, if you're interested in reading about a family that leans on their faith, you'll enjoy this book. If you're not religious, you won't be put off by her unpretentious insertions. 3 Stars = I liked the book. I enjoyed it. I'm glad I read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    BookHound 🐾

    I found this book to be really interesting. Previous to reading this book, I had only been familiar with the story as it was portrayed in "The Sound of Music" movie. The movie ended with the family beginning their escape from Nazi-occupied Austria, leaving you wondering what became of them. This book filled in those details and tells their story as they journeyed on to America, sharing their love of their country and music with those that they meet. The book is written in a very informal (in a g I found this book to be really interesting. Previous to reading this book, I had only been familiar with the story as it was portrayed in "The Sound of Music" movie. The movie ended with the family beginning their escape from Nazi-occupied Austria, leaving you wondering what became of them. This book filled in those details and tells their story as they journeyed on to America, sharing their love of their country and music with those that they meet. The book is written in a very informal (in a good sense) manner, as if you and Maria are visiting and she is personally telling you the story of her and her family. Because of the family's Roman Catholic background, there are numerous Catholic references which I had to look up because of unfamiliarity with the different elements of the denomination. Despite the fact that it was a bit slow in some parts, it was a fascinating story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachelle

    The Story of the Trapp Family Singers, is a “must-read” for every family attempting to incorporate Thomas Jefferson Education in their home. I say this because among many others, the following lessons are taught in this book: 1) Trust in God 2) Work together for the good of ourselves and others 3) Education can happen outside of a school I pulled this book off the shelf for the second time because I was feeling rather discouraged and knew it was just what I needed to get me back on track. Like Jo The Story of the Trapp Family Singers, is a “must-read” for every family attempting to incorporate Thomas Jefferson Education in their home. I say this because among many others, the following lessons are taught in this book: 1) Trust in God 2) Work together for the good of ourselves and others 3) Education can happen outside of a school I pulled this book off the shelf for the second time because I was feeling rather discouraged and knew it was just what I needed to get me back on track. Like Job, this family starts off very well to do. They live in a mansion in the Austrian countryside, have a whole household of servants, own a car (which was uncommon at the time), and are able to travel anywhere they like without thinking of the cost. But, like Job, it was all taken away in an instant. It was the beginning of World War II and Hitler was making things difficult on Austria’s economy. One day the phone rang at the Von Trapp home. Their bank had failed; all their money was lost. At this news, most people would despair and become lost themselves. However, like Job, the Von Trapps take it with amazing fortitude. Baroness Von Trap exclaims repeatedly, “Aren’t we lucky.” Her reasoning is that if this hadn’t have happened, they wouldn’t have discovered who their true friends were, nor what great character their children had. Rather than blame God, they turn to Him in their time of need, remembering their creed: “The only important thing on earth for us is to find out what is the Will of God and to do it” (11). And their mantra: “God’s will hath no why” (13). Of the many examples of the Trapp family working together for the good of their family and others, I choose two to describe here. After the family loses their fortune, they have to find a way to support themselves. The last thing they consider is to sing as a family. However, they come to realize that not only is this the will of God, but it is actually serving their fellowmen by lifting their hearts and spirits. So despite their initial strong objections, they succumb and consent to give concerts. This path becomes a life-saver for them, becoming the means of their escape from Austria when they procure a contract to go on tour in America. While here, their music gives them many opportunities to serve others, but the most significant is when they use their fame to garner support for destitute families in Austria. Between concert stops, they all work together to package and ship the money and humanitarian items to their homeland. The Trapps also demonstrate that children can be educated outside of a school. When they first go on tour in America, they believe they need to leave their youngest daughters behind in a boarding school. However, over time they learn that the girls can be educated at home by a tutor, and then eventually they realize that the girls and the tutor can tour with them. I loved watching this metamorphosis because it is similar to the change that happened to me when I decided to educate my children at home. When my daughter first started school, I considered the teachers there the “experts” and looked to them for all the answers to my child’s problems, whether academic or otherwise. But as I began to consider and research homeschool, I realized that no, I am the expert on my child, and the best place for her to be is with her family. The Trapp family is an excellent example of a family trusting God, working together, and educating children with the family. That is why I recommend this book to every TJed family.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This account is written by the original Maria, it was only recently I discovered the film was based on a true story and more surprising to me, the film is very true to the actual story. The first part of the book covers the same ground as the film, the last two thirds concentrates on their life after leaving Austria and their singing career in America. This book could have been more descriptive for me, I felt I didn't get to know the family much throughout the book, for example I didn't feel any This account is written by the original Maria, it was only recently I discovered the film was based on a true story and more surprising to me, the film is very true to the actual story. The first part of the book covers the same ground as the film, the last two thirds concentrates on their life after leaving Austria and their singing career in America. This book could have been more descriptive for me, I felt I didn't get to know the family much throughout the book, for example I didn't feel any of the children's individual personalities came through or scenes created in my mind. I was interested in their singing career but was left wondering what they sang, I think there was a brief mention of titles but their family concerts were such an interesting and unique occupation I was left wanting to hear lots more about this. There were some photos but I would have loved to have seen more. I would have loved an epilogue, I wonder what their many children went on to do in life after their very musical start?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leona

    What a powerful story and testament to a spirited woman, a gentle loving husband, and ten extraordinary children. This was our local library's July book selection. Even though I absolutely adore "The Sound of Music", I would never have read this book if it weren't for our book group. I am very glad that I did. I don't have too much more to add to what other reviewers have already stated so well. Except, I do have a couple of points of reflection that I would like to share. I recognize that some What a powerful story and testament to a spirited woman, a gentle loving husband, and ten extraordinary children. This was our local library's July book selection. Even though I absolutely adore "The Sound of Music", I would never have read this book if it weren't for our book group. I am very glad that I did. I don't have too much more to add to what other reviewers have already stated so well. Except, I do have a couple of points of reflection that I would like to share. I recognize that some of the details of the book are different than the screen and broadway play. But for me, some things in a book just can't translate to the screen with impact. For example: 1) It was much more powerful to watch them climb over the alps to freedom than to exit Austria on a train. For me, the climb over the Alps was symbolic of their overall journey which the movie did not touch upon. They went from being one of the wealthiest and aristocratic families in Europe, to penniless refugees without any rights and at the mercy of each country they visited. They often didn't know where their next meal was coming from or where they would sleep. 2) I know the family struggled deeply with the depiction of their father as a cold hearted naval captain that distanced himself from his family. I never quite felt that way watching Christopher Plummer. I felt Plummer portrayed a man who loved his children very much, but lost his way in the depth of his grief for his late wife. I think the book alludes to the fact that Captain Georg also had these moments and often traveled great distances away from home because he couldn't bear to see his home and children without his beloved wife. The book certainly confirms the kind, dedicated, patient, loving husband and father that he was. In fact, I would say he was "the glue" that held them together and his untimely death impacted their lives significantly. They carried the burden of grief a long time after his death. I was deeply impressed with this family's love, courage, devotion and spiritual faith. It was the guiding light in their life and a true inspiration.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This was such a great book written by Maria herself!! I could hear Julie Andrews' voice through the whole thing. The movie really captured my impression of Maria's real personality, at least according to this book. I always wondered what happened to them after leaving Austria--now I know! She was so optimistic about everything. She said at one point that she was happy that they lost all their money because it gave the children an opportunity to let their true characters shine through--and they w This was such a great book written by Maria herself!! I could hear Julie Andrews' voice through the whole thing. The movie really captured my impression of Maria's real personality, at least according to this book. I always wondered what happened to them after leaving Austria--now I know! She was so optimistic about everything. She said at one point that she was happy that they lost all their money because it gave the children an opportunity to let their true characters shine through--and they were solid, wonderful characters. It also gave them an opportunity to see how generous and loving their friends and neighbors where. I know I wouldn't have been so happy about losing all my money!! Really a great and interesting read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    The true story behind the acclaimed musical/motion picture The Sound of Music, this book is a powerful testament to love and family, even in the horrors of WWII.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    I happened to catch the Sound of Music on television the other day -- one of my favorite movies -- and decided to pick up the book. It's always interesting to see how reality inspires fiction. In this case, I discovered that the fictional account bears almost no resemblance to reality. A few elements were accurately reflected in the play/movie: Maria was in the convent preparing to be a nun. She was a tomboyish young woman who was always in trouble for un-nun-like behavior. The Captain did have I happened to catch the Sound of Music on television the other day -- one of my favorite movies -- and decided to pick up the book. It's always interesting to see how reality inspires fiction. In this case, I discovered that the fictional account bears almost no resemblance to reality. A few elements were accurately reflected in the play/movie: Maria was in the convent preparing to be a nun. She was a tomboyish young woman who was always in trouble for un-nun-like behavior. The Captain did have 7 children, and he did use a whistle to call them. But he was not a cold, uncaring father -- he loved his children, though he did stay gone for long periods of time because they reminded him of his dead wife. He was dating and almost engaged to a princess -- royalty! -- not a baronness. (Sometimes I wonder why in the world they change things like that!) When the invitation to join the Nazi military came, the family simply declined and left the country in a normal, unexciting way. And that was all in the first couple of chapters! The book chronicles the story of the Trapp family for years and years as they traveled the world as a singing sensation, added three more children, bought a farm, opened a music camp. The writing was at times delightful and at other times a bit slow and contrived. But this was Maria Augusta Trapp's first book (she wrote another one later - that's on my list as well), and she was a singer, not a writer. Her faith was apparent throughout, and spiritual messages were beautifully woven into the life of this extraordinary family.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mom

    Maria Augusta Trapp, what a wonderful inspiration to women everywhere! Reading the story of her life has made me in awe of her. She persevered through every tribulation possible, and remained strong in her faith to God and relied on that faith to endure. Her writing is so beautiful, her descriptions are so rich that you feel you are there with her experiencing it all over again with her. This is true to the end and I caution you that the two final chapters require several boxes of Kleenexes to m Maria Augusta Trapp, what a wonderful inspiration to women everywhere! Reading the story of her life has made me in awe of her. She persevered through every tribulation possible, and remained strong in her faith to God and relied on that faith to endure. Her writing is so beautiful, her descriptions are so rich that you feel you are there with her experiencing it all over again with her. This is true to the end and I caution you that the two final chapters require several boxes of Kleenexes to make it through. P.S. I must confess that I did go back and read those final chapters and you can make it through everything except the chapter called "A Letter". Even if you skip that chapter I think you can make it through. "A Letter" is just too heartfelt to get through without crying, in reading it you feel the emotion that it was written with to the extent of it happening to you today.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    What a wonderful more complete story of the Trapp family then we get from The Sound of Music -- which I love and why I read the book. Heart warming story of faith and family.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    To say I loved this book is an understatement - it was fabulous, moving, and even funnier than I imagined it would be! Of course I grew up watching the great film, Sound of Music, of which Maria's life was based from, but I'd never read the true story of her life. There was so much more to her life than was portrayed in the film, and it was exciting to really get to know her in her own words. Maria von Trapp shares her life from convent to barroness to family singing group - from Austria to Ameri To say I loved this book is an understatement - it was fabulous, moving, and even funnier than I imagined it would be! Of course I grew up watching the great film, Sound of Music, of which Maria's life was based from, but I'd never read the true story of her life. There was so much more to her life than was portrayed in the film, and it was exciting to really get to know her in her own words. Maria von Trapp shares her life from convent to barroness to family singing group - from Austria to America – filling the pages with humor, love, faith and family, and lot's and lot's of stories. Like learning their very first American songs: “My Old Kentucky Home” and Old Black Joe”. And trying her first taste of Coca-Cola, root beer, and ginger ale (she disliked the first two “decidedly”). I was inspired by so many of these wonderful stories of the family's struggles adapting to a new world and language, or the chaos of living on the road with a large family...or building a house in the mountains of Vermont in the middle of winter. My favorite story remains that of her engagement to Captain Georg von Trapp – much more humorous than the movie version. “None of the people we had met on the boat lived in New York. We had no acquaintances and no friends, no letters of introduction to anybody. We discovered the New World by ourselves.” Her faith was such a part of her life, her family, and thus her story. It's on every page. You can hear it in every word she wrote. This book has become a new favorite for me, and sparked a deeper interest in this inspiring family who followed wherever God led, no matter the cost. I would highly recommend this to everyone - it's both greatly historical and faith-filled. “We have now the precious opportunity to find out for ourselves whether the words we have heard and read so often can be taken literally: 'Seek ye first the kingdom of God and His justice, and all these things shall be added until you.'”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Freyja Vanadis

    For pure sentimental reasons I loved it, but if it wasn't for The Sound Of Music this would be just another mediocre book. It was published in 1949 so the style of Maria's writing is archaic and old-fashioned; people don't talk like they did 60 years ago, even if English wasn't their first language. So that was kind of annoying and hard to get past. It was good to read how the family's story actually happened, though, and not the whitewashed version of TSOM. However, it would've been nice if she For pure sentimental reasons I loved it, but if it wasn't for The Sound Of Music this would be just another mediocre book. It was published in 1949 so the style of Maria's writing is archaic and old-fashioned; people don't talk like they did 60 years ago, even if English wasn't their first language. So that was kind of annoying and hard to get past. It was good to read how the family's story actually happened, though, and not the whitewashed version of TSOM. However, it would've been nice if she had fleshed out the story of her life before meeting the Von Trapp family. She doesn't say anything about her own family, what her life was like, why she decided to enter a convent, or anything like that except that she was raised in the mountains. Also, the constant religious stuff grated on my nerves, even though I should've expected it since she was in training to become a nun.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Felicity

    I picked this book up when I was staying with a friend and had to buy a copy after I'd read 40 pages! I was curious to read the book that the famous film/musical version was based on. It was completely different but that's no surprise! I preferred the book because it was more realistic and I learned much more about the Trapp family and their adventures beyond leaving Austria. Maria von Trapp has a natural intimate writing style and is very religious and spiritual. As an atheist I found this inte I picked this book up when I was staying with a friend and had to buy a copy after I'd read 40 pages! I was curious to read the book that the famous film/musical version was based on. It was completely different but that's no surprise! I preferred the book because it was more realistic and I learned much more about the Trapp family and their adventures beyond leaving Austria. Maria von Trapp has a natural intimate writing style and is very religious and spiritual. As an atheist I found this interesting and think it could be quite comforting if you are going through a rough time. They went through some tough times yet they usually managed to find a positive solution by a bit of luck, praying and using their entreprenerial skills. I still love the musical but the book is much more profound and real.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol Bakker

    I loved it. The story swept me up. The courage, faith, industry and vitality of the whole Trapp family make me sigh in admiration.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    While I enjoyed reading this pleasant tale of an Austrian family emigrating to the USA and then setting down roots, I found it a bit exhausting to see Maria von Trapp's world through her nun-coloured glasses. Maria couldn't even say anything bad about Adolf Hitler, but to describe him as a bit rude. In fact, the worst thing she says about anybody, in the entire book, is to call a soldier's party girl a "bedbug". The woman has put such a rosy gloss on everything, it becomes difficult to percieve While I enjoyed reading this pleasant tale of an Austrian family emigrating to the USA and then setting down roots, I found it a bit exhausting to see Maria von Trapp's world through her nun-coloured glasses. Maria couldn't even say anything bad about Adolf Hitler, but to describe him as a bit rude. In fact, the worst thing she says about anybody, in the entire book, is to call a soldier's party girl a "bedbug". The woman has put such a rosy gloss on everything, it becomes difficult to percieve any hardship at all. And (in the very last chapter,) she insists that the Trapp family did endure hardship, she provides one example (one daughter going missing for three days,) but then refuses to elaborate on that hardship. We never find out her reasons for running away, or her state of mind, or her health. The reader is only given a very tiny sample of "hardship", and then the door is closed. Hardship is private. So after reading the entire book, I read the last chapter and suddenly had a feeling of mistrust develop, about Maria von Trapp. I can only imagine what she left out, in an effort to promote only the positive side of her story. If you're reading this to get to know the real tale behind "The Sound of Music" (as it is boldly emphasized on the cover,) you need not read further than the first few chapters. I was pleasantly surprised as to how much more of the tale there was to be told. Maria's writing style is simplistic, but descriptive enough for even the least imaginative reader. The language is easy to understand and straightforward. I enjoyed the impressions of the family as they arrived in this intensely foreign America, learning how the backward New Worlders went about life and attempting to blend their own customs with what was acceptable in the new culture. Overall, I am not unhappy that I read this book. It is a piece of pop culture I was glad to become accquainted with.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Trautner

    Loved it! Maria writes it as if you're her friend. She's kind of hilarious. I love some of the anecdotes she shares about funny situations that develop from her not-yet-firm grasp of the English language. I had no idea the depth of the family's faith, or their experience in America. The first half of the book is what the movie is based on, but the second half all deals with them in America and it was really interesting to hear her perspective on Americans, especially considering it was during WW Loved it! Maria writes it as if you're her friend. She's kind of hilarious. I love some of the anecdotes she shares about funny situations that develop from her not-yet-firm grasp of the English language. I had no idea the depth of the family's faith, or their experience in America. The first half of the book is what the movie is based on, but the second half all deals with them in America and it was really interesting to hear her perspective on Americans, especially considering it was during WWII.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Inés

    Meh, demasiado happy flower todo.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Hill

    So much more to the story than The Sound of Music! I loved reading about what happened *after* the family fled their native country, and von Trapp's faith is central to the story, but in a quiet, continuous manner

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    I caught half of The Sound of Music on tv a couple of weeks ago and I had a sudden desire to know about the real Trapp family and their story. I thought this book was interesting and very different from the movie. I'm glad that Maria wrote a book and that I could find out about what the family did after escaping Nazi-occupied Austria. It was funny in some parts and slow in others--you can tell the book wasn't written by a writer, but by a real person just telling her story (so that is both good I caught half of The Sound of Music on tv a couple of weeks ago and I had a sudden desire to know about the real Trapp family and their story. I thought this book was interesting and very different from the movie. I'm glad that Maria wrote a book and that I could find out about what the family did after escaping Nazi-occupied Austria. It was funny in some parts and slow in others--you can tell the book wasn't written by a writer, but by a real person just telling her story (so that is both good and bad.) I enjoyed seeing how much faith the Trapp family had and how they were willing to submit their will to God's in all kinds of dire circumstances--I was inspired to try to face my own trials with the same positive outlook and total reliance on God. Worth reading and inspirational--I would give it more than three stars but the writing style made parts a little slow for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen Allen

    I first read this book back in about 5th grade as a Scholastic Book. It is one of about a dozen books I have re-read. And I've re-read it many times. It is also the reason that when I went to see The Sound of Music I came away very disappointed. So much had been changed to appeal to the movie audience. I have recommended the book to several and since I finally lost (probably lent it and it was never returned to me) my copy from the 1960's, I bought a new copy to re-read yet again. So much better I first read this book back in about 5th grade as a Scholastic Book. It is one of about a dozen books I have re-read. And I've re-read it many times. It is also the reason that when I went to see The Sound of Music I came away very disappointed. So much had been changed to appeal to the movie audience. I have recommended the book to several and since I finally lost (probably lent it and it was never returned to me) my copy from the 1960's, I bought a new copy to re-read yet again. So much better than the movie!!! I just reread the book. It does loose steam in the last couple of chapters, but it was relating some hard events near the end. I'm quite surprised to see comments on how true the movie was to the book. I see many major changes made for the movie for a more broad appeal. Disappointing changes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura-Lee Rahn

    The True Story that inspired the film/ play "Sound of Music". This book barely resembles the events of the film. However, that does not make it any less satisfying. This is truly one of the most interesting biographies you will ever be sucked into. Maria Trapp is able to laugh at herself but at the same time it feels like this book is deeply biased to her point of view. But that doesn't mean I didn't find a lot of entertainment in trying to read "between the lines" of what she was saying. It see The True Story that inspired the film/ play "Sound of Music". This book barely resembles the events of the film. However, that does not make it any less satisfying. This is truly one of the most interesting biographies you will ever be sucked into. Maria Trapp is able to laugh at herself but at the same time it feels like this book is deeply biased to her point of view. But that doesn't mean I didn't find a lot of entertainment in trying to read "between the lines" of what she was saying. It seems that the author is equally committed to her faith, her husband, her family and a bit of a tyrant too. Interesting, fascinating, tense sometimes, often funny and never less than enveloping. A book for "yer and yer and yer!" Laura-Lee (Was Here)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alyne

    Such a great book. I wonder when she wrote it and what inspired her to do so? I'm wondering if she was offered a book deal or just did it of her own accord? I wonder how much of the book is straightforward truth and how much is a bit slanted to sound more positive? Just things I'm curious about! An excellent autobiography, really encourages spiritual strength, focus, and positivity in the face of true adversity (war, poverty, miscarriages etc). Such an amazing story, they are a couple that has do Such a great book. I wonder when she wrote it and what inspired her to do so? I'm wondering if she was offered a book deal or just did it of her own accord? I wonder how much of the book is straightforward truth and how much is a bit slanted to sound more positive? Just things I'm curious about! An excellent autobiography, really encourages spiritual strength, focus, and positivity in the face of true adversity (war, poverty, miscarriages etc). Such an amazing story, they are a couple that has done so much with their lives! It's part inspiring and part intimidating haha :D It's a wonder they survived all of it!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephie Williams

    it certainly was interesting that the book was so different then the movie. Not even the names of the children were the same. There is nothing in the movie about the second part of the book about their life in the US. There also was no dramatic escape from Austria, which also occur far earlier than right after their honeymoon.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I loved this book. After reading it, I find the musical pales in comparison - knowing the real trials and tribulations the family went through makes the whole thing seem almost a mockery to me. Anyway, the book is a great piece of history, and a must-read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Jennings

    As a fan of “The Sound of Music,” I really enjoyed this “story behind the story.” It was fun discovering the factual details, such as: Maria’s disappointment at her assignment with the von Trapps, that she taught/encouraged them to sing, that the Captain initially really didn’t want them singing in public, that the Captain’s other love interest was the one to tell Maria she was in love with him, that the Captain did have an offer from the Axis powers to fight in their Navy, etc. Their escape fro As a fan of “The Sound of Music,” I really enjoyed this “story behind the story.” It was fun discovering the factual details, such as: Maria’s disappointment at her assignment with the von Trapps, that she taught/encouraged them to sing, that the Captain initially really didn’t want them singing in public, that the Captain’s other love interest was the one to tell Maria she was in love with him, that the Captain did have an offer from the Axis powers to fight in their Navy, etc. Their escape from the Nazis, however, was not nearly so adventurous. They left the country for Italy, and found out the next day the borders of Austria were closed. All these details are discovered in about the first 60 pages, and the rest of the book is about their adventures in America, making it as a singing group and then developing their music camp. Maria was quite the character, and her escapades were interesting and amusing. I think the movie did a good job portraying the personality of the real lady.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lobstergirl

    I'd been wanting to read this for awhile, as The Sound of Music is one of my favorite movies - Maria's boundless optimism, youthful energy, can-do attitude, and bottomless faith, combined with Captain von Trapp's worldliness and stern yet vaguely faggy swashbuckling are, for me, a match made in heaven and I never tire of watching these two fall for each other onscreen. How did the movie match up with the reality, I wondered? More than I thought they would, actually. Although the courtship and ma I'd been wanting to read this for awhile, as The Sound of Music is one of my favorite movies - Maria's boundless optimism, youthful energy, can-do attitude, and bottomless faith, combined with Captain von Trapp's worldliness and stern yet vaguely faggy swashbuckling are, for me, a match made in heaven and I never tire of watching these two fall for each other onscreen. How did the movie match up with the reality, I wondered? More than I thought they would, actually. Although the courtship and marriage are disappointingly all wrapped up by page 62, there really is a moment where the Captain's presumed fiancee, a Princess Yvonne, comes to the villa and confronts Maria: "Do you realize that the Captain is in love with you?" I always assumed that was Hollywood talking! Hitler actually makes an appearance in the book. Maria and Georg went to a new exhibit of German art in Munich for which der Führer had selected the works. It included a wall of cheesy paintings of him in medieval armor on horseback. They went to the restaurant next door and found themselves seated at a table next to...Hitler and a bunch of SS guards. All were drinking beer except Hitler, who was drinking raspberry juice (apparently he's a teetotaler, and a vegetarian). The merriment was such that several times he nearly choked and fell backwards, "his thin hair fell over his forehead, his arms waved in the air, his world-famous moustachelet quivered - he was an embarrassing sight." (Heinrich Himmler confiscated and inhabited the lovely Trapp villa outside Salzburg during the war; after the war, the Trapps sold it to a Catholic seminary and today it's a hotel.) Also not addressed in the movie: Maria's fear of Negroes. "After asking around, I learned that in the whole neighborhood there were only three midwives to be found, all of them Negroes. At that time I was a little afraid of colored people, whom we had never seen in our country, and who still seemed to us a little legendary; people out of A Thousand and One Nights, interesting to look at and to talk to, but a little scary to have around and too close." But her fear quickly turns to enchantment, as their bus tours the South. "Bashfully and embarrassedly at first, later more and more encouraged by the always hearty and kind reception, I asked whether I might take a picture of this old grandma rocking on the porch with the cutest little darky on her lap, or of that group of sturdy colored boys picking cotton or harvesting peanuts." Even before they left Austria, the Trapps lost most of their wealth in a bank failure. The Trapp Family Choir became a necessary business enterprise, as the only thing Georg knew how to do was command submarines, and he did not wish to do so for the Nazis. Life in America for many years was quite penny-pinching; during the war, as Austrians, they were declared enemy aliens (although two Trapp sons served in the U.S. armed forces). The main underpinning of the book is the family's extremely strong Catholic faith; no matter how bad things get, no matter how many days they're trapped on Ellis Island, no matter how many auditions they fail at, no matter how many music impresarios criticize their lack of sex appeal, God will provide.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    As someone who's seen the Sound of Music dozens of times throughout my childhood, I was excited to read the real story. And for the most part, it delivered - an interesting, easy to read expansion on a familiar tale, that suffers a bit from a lack of depth. By now, the basic story is probably familiar to most people - a young nun-to-be leaves her abbey to become a governess to a family of seven children. Fate intervenes and she marries into the family, before they all have to flee Europe to escap As someone who's seen the Sound of Music dozens of times throughout my childhood, I was excited to read the real story. And for the most part, it delivered - an interesting, easy to read expansion on a familiar tale, that suffers a bit from a lack of depth. By now, the basic story is probably familiar to most people - a young nun-to-be leaves her abbey to become a governess to a family of seven children. Fate intervenes and she marries into the family, before they all have to flee Europe to escape the Nazis. It's easy to see why it's a compelling story - romance, war, danger, rebirth - it really does have everything. And as a fan of the movie, it was interesting to read the story in more detail, see what happened after they left Austria, and learn how the movie differed from reality. However, I was disappointed that the book tended to gloss over the people involved. It was a faithful retelling of what happened, but doesn't expand on the who. Maria's relationships with the children and with her husband aren't delved into much at all. Her relationship with Capt. von Trapp was especially hard to get a handle on. You get a sense she wasn't in love with him at their marriage, but then a few years later, he's referred to as "beloved." But there's no explanation on when or why that shift in their relationship occurred. And the children are referred to in passing really, without much detail on their personalities or interests. I would have liked more focus on the family itself, as opposed to just what happened to them. I think part of this may just be that Maria herself didn't want to share that much personal information. This was written over 60 years ago and times have changed. But I'm used to the more "tell-all" type of memoirs that are more personal and make it feel like you really know the subject. In this case, I feel like I know what happened to these people, but I don't feel like I know them really. I would still recommend this book to fans of the movie, as it's definitely worth a read, but it wasn't as satisfying as I had hoped either.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I would give this a *3.5* this book by Maria von Trapp. writes of the famous Trapp family Singers. She takes her memoir for 1926-to about 1947. anyone who has seen the Sound Of Music may find this book interesting. Maria von Trapp gives an honest depiction of her meeting the family when she is hired a a teacher for the daughter also named Maria who was in poor health. she soon becomes close to all the children. she actually does teach them how to sing and blend their voices. within a year Captai I would give this a *3.5* this book by Maria von Trapp. writes of the famous Trapp family Singers. She takes her memoir for 1926-to about 1947. anyone who has seen the Sound Of Music may find this book interesting. Maria von Trapp gives an honest depiction of her meeting the family when she is hired a a teacher for the daughter also named Maria who was in poor health. she soon becomes close to all the children. she actually does teach them how to sing and blend their voices. within a year Captain Georg von Trapp becomes close the Maria as well. they marry a year after they all meet in 1927. within about ten years all changes in Europe and Austria where the von Trapps lived. Georg is pressured to join Hitler and he fights it. their bank crashes and looses all their money they are no longer rich. unlike the movie where the family escapes the actually board a train and then a ship and come to the USA in the late 1930s. they have three more children between 1929 and 1939. set up life here. start a career as the von Trapp family singer and tour the USA, in the mid 1940s they find a farm in Vermont and build life there. and soon a summer camp for families to learn music and then The Trapp family lodge which still runs today. this was a pretty good read. I wish she wrote some more books to follow the years. this book only covers a bit over 20 years. If you are fans of the Sound of Music and want to know more about the family this is a good read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

    Just a tad bit long, the end is not as exciting as the beginning. The religious references, too, are quite repetitive in the end. It feels like reading about a whole family of Pollyannas: always happy, always positive, somewhat reckless. You've seen the musical - The Sound of Music - or the movie of the same name. Maria, an aspiring nun, gets a job as a private teacher in the family of widowed naval commander Georg Johannes von Trapp. They end up married, touring the world as a musical choir, esc Just a tad bit long, the end is not as exciting as the beginning. The religious references, too, are quite repetitive in the end. It feels like reading about a whole family of Pollyannas: always happy, always positive, somewhat reckless. You've seen the musical - The Sound of Music - or the movie of the same name. Maria, an aspiring nun, gets a job as a private teacher in the family of widowed naval commander Georg Johannes von Trapp. They end up married, touring the world as a musical choir, escaping WWII Europe for a life in the USA. They sure suffered and achieved more than the average family. Their settling in Vermont looks like the typical American dream coming true. But sometimes they seems too kind, too optimists, almost unreal. Mrs Trapp has a good sense of humour and a good sense of timing: I enjoyed reading about her attempts to learn English. Her writing is pleasant and it often makes you feel part of the family. It's almost a fairytale, a bedtime story.

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