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Deeper Learning: How Eight Innovative Public Schools Are Transforming Education in the Twenty-First Century

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For centuries societies—and the policy-makers, teachers, and parents that inhabit them—have grappled with the controversy around how students learn best. As far back as Confucius, philosophers and experts have upheld the virtues of learning by doing rather than by listening. Yet U.S. schools continue their attempts to engage students through conventional methods like lectu For centuries societies—and the policy-makers, teachers, and parents that inhabit them—have grappled with the controversy around how students learn best. As far back as Confucius, philosophers and experts have upheld the virtues of learning by doing rather than by listening. Yet U.S. schools continue their attempts to engage students through conventional methods like lectures and note-taking, frequently with dismal results. In Untitled on deeper learning, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath propose an exciting new framework for American schooling that leads to more meaningful, deeper learning—learning that engages every student and inspires each young person to reach her full potential. With captivating, honest examples from eight innovative and diverse schools across the nation, this cutting-edge book charts the path to crafting learning environments that are adaptive and flexible; these schools not only enable educators to meet the widely varied needs of individual students, but also offer integrative and interactive approaches that include real life, project-based education. From instituting (dis)orientation rituals and proactively empowering teachers to designing a student-led interdisciplinary project on American poverty and revealing the virtues of integrating (not relying on) new technology, readers will be fascinated by what deeper learning looks and feels like in real schools day-to-day. In an ever-changing economy and world it’s no secret that becoming a well-rounded, dynamic, and engaged adult requires nurture and development in multiple areas. Untitled on deeper learning gives teachers and parents the tools they have been searching for to support young people in becoming critical thinkers, collaborators, and creators of a better world.


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For centuries societies—and the policy-makers, teachers, and parents that inhabit them—have grappled with the controversy around how students learn best. As far back as Confucius, philosophers and experts have upheld the virtues of learning by doing rather than by listening. Yet U.S. schools continue their attempts to engage students through conventional methods like lectu For centuries societies—and the policy-makers, teachers, and parents that inhabit them—have grappled with the controversy around how students learn best. As far back as Confucius, philosophers and experts have upheld the virtues of learning by doing rather than by listening. Yet U.S. schools continue their attempts to engage students through conventional methods like lectures and note-taking, frequently with dismal results. In Untitled on deeper learning, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath propose an exciting new framework for American schooling that leads to more meaningful, deeper learning—learning that engages every student and inspires each young person to reach her full potential. With captivating, honest examples from eight innovative and diverse schools across the nation, this cutting-edge book charts the path to crafting learning environments that are adaptive and flexible; these schools not only enable educators to meet the widely varied needs of individual students, but also offer integrative and interactive approaches that include real life, project-based education. From instituting (dis)orientation rituals and proactively empowering teachers to designing a student-led interdisciplinary project on American poverty and revealing the virtues of integrating (not relying on) new technology, readers will be fascinated by what deeper learning looks and feels like in real schools day-to-day. In an ever-changing economy and world it’s no secret that becoming a well-rounded, dynamic, and engaged adult requires nurture and development in multiple areas. Untitled on deeper learning gives teachers and parents the tools they have been searching for to support young people in becoming critical thinkers, collaborators, and creators of a better world.

30 review for Deeper Learning: How Eight Innovative Public Schools Are Transforming Education in the Twenty-First Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    A good introduction to Deeper Learning, but really best suited to parents or educators with no knowledge of Deeper Learning at all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Maurer

    Perhaps one of the best books about education I have read this year. This book was exactly what I needed. As an instructional coach and working in a building that is transforming the platform of teaching to project based learning, this book really helped to guide me with questions to ponder and ideas to process. From the book description you are able to see that the author spent time with eight different schools looking at the key ingredients to help students reach deep learning in their educatio Perhaps one of the best books about education I have read this year. This book was exactly what I needed. As an instructional coach and working in a building that is transforming the platform of teaching to project based learning, this book really helped to guide me with questions to ponder and ideas to process. From the book description you are able to see that the author spent time with eight different schools looking at the key ingredients to help students reach deep learning in their education journey. This is so vital because for so long we have taught education as survey courses. We pack so much into so little that we barely scratch the surface in learning. What we are seeing with many schools today is a shift with perhaps less content, but taking time to really dig deep into ideas that will help them craft and develop the thinking skills needed to survive once they leave the confines of the education system. While I read this book I shared my notes online and when it was all over I had over five pages of typed notes. There are so many great examples of teaching and learning. There are fundamental questions that make you pause and reflect on the answers to your own classroom and school. We are going to be using this book as our first book club book for our staff. It is an easy read that does not require deep concentration. It is not cutesy fluff book that so often hits the high ranks of education books. Even more important it does not bash the education system that is so often the case. Instead it is a breath of fresh air into the amazing things schools and teachers are doing with students. It gives promise to the future. More importantly, it leaves you ready to push your comfort zones to move in the direction of deeper learning. If you are involved in education, then this is a book that is worth your time to read. You will not be disappointed. **If you are interested in purchasing this book please use the link above. Any money from Amazon Affiliate links goes towards funding either school supplies for schools in need or to our school goal of raising enough money to build a school in areas of the world lacking education for students. You can learn more here http://coffeeforthebrain.com/build-a-... ** Last, if you are interested in being part of a book club with this book please let me know. I am in the process of developing one that will be operated online.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    How could I not like a book that features the school where I work as such a beacon of hope for the American education system?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    This short book takes a look at eight secondary schools providing a deeper learning education to students. Through these case studies they highlight six major trends in these schools to which educators, parents, students, and policy makers should pay attention. The trends are creating a community of learners, empowering students to lead their own learning, teaching through contextualized interdisciplinary project-based learning, networking with the community outside of the school for both studen This short book takes a look at eight secondary schools providing a deeper learning education to students. Through these case studies they highlight six major trends in these schools to which educators, parents, students, and policy makers should pay attention. The trends are creating a community of learners, empowering students to lead their own learning, teaching through contextualized interdisciplinary project-based learning, networking with the community outside of the school for both students and the school as a whole, personalizing learning for every student, and using technology to enhance collaboration, communication, and curation of work. These are the trends that truly make a difference for our students. If we care about the future of our country, this is what all schools should be striving towards. An important an accessible volume that should be a guide to the future of education!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carson Fredrickson

    Our education system is not up to international standards, but their are a few anamoly's in the United States that blatantly ignore the established standard for US education. This book very clearly details what these schools are doing to uniquely create students inspired, prepared students for the 21st century. It is very informative, and the authors are clearly very informed. A great book for anyone interested in education! Our education system is not up to international standards, but their are a few anamoly's in the United States that blatantly ignore the established standard for US education. This book very clearly details what these schools are doing to uniquely create students inspired, prepared students for the 21st century. It is very informative, and the authors are clearly very informed. A great book for anyone interested in education!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cayenne

    Such an interesting book. I have learned so much from these books about challenging conventional methods of schooling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    One striking aspect of Deeper Learning is how much the authors, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath, highlight the words and work of real teachers, leaders, and students in the schools they profile. The whole book is full of short anecdotes from the individuals doing the hard work of transforming schools, and we, the readers, often get these stories from a close, over-the-shoulder perspective. Reading this, I didn't need convincing as to whether or not this work was possible—I felt instead that I One striking aspect of Deeper Learning is how much the authors, Monica Martinez and Dennis McGrath, highlight the words and work of real teachers, leaders, and students in the schools they profile. The whole book is full of short anecdotes from the individuals doing the hard work of transforming schools, and we, the readers, often get these stories from a close, over-the-shoulder perspective. Reading this, I didn't need convincing as to whether or not this work was possible—I felt instead that I was hearing from the people who were doing the work. The relevance and purpose of what they are doing to invest and to inspire students, and to reach beyond the walls of their schools feels urgent and vital. In their concluding chapter, the authors make one of their more forceful claims about the necessity of this work: If public education does not transform, not only will it become irrelevant, but it will generate more and far-reaching inequality with regard to education and broader life outcomes that have for years been linked to education attainment (p 186). So many of the stories they tell are fundamentally about that issue of relevance. Education, they argue, must rest on meaningful, relevant connections between students and between students and teachers. The work that students do ought to be relevant to them, to their communities, and to the education and careers they will have beyond their time in K-12. The question I ask myself, as an education professional and as a parent, is about that connection between relevance and equity. When I choose to accept the irrelevance of what many students are doing in school, then am I simultaneously accepting inequity in the broader life outcomes of students in different communities? I also appreciate the broad definition of "relevance" that Martinez and McGrath embrace. Rather that narrowing relevance solely to math and reading outcomes, or to college acceptance rates, or to employment opportunities, they broadly conceive of relevant deeper learning as "the capacity for learning how to learn." They elaborate: More specifically, Deeper Learning is the process of preparing and empowering students to master essential academic content, think critically and solve complex problems, work collaboratively, communicate effectively, have an academic mindset, and be self-directed in their education (p 3). This leaves me thinking that if I'm looking for evidence of deeper learning in schools and classrooms, then I, too, have to listen to the students, leaders, and teachers doing transformative work. And if I'm looking for relevance in particular, then I should listen to students and to their families. Because it's not just teachers who should expect education to feel relevant—students should feel that relevance, and families should expect it. And setting high expectations for relevance is one step toward enabling the transformation the authors describe.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Very interesting book with interesting and exciting examples of great things being done in innovative schools across the country. If the "Deeper Learning" school my daughter's district is building this year is only half as engaging as the schools described in this book, she will have an amazingly challenging and engaging education. Very interesting book with interesting and exciting examples of great things being done in innovative schools across the country. If the "Deeper Learning" school my daughter's district is building this year is only half as engaging as the schools described in this book, she will have an amazingly challenging and engaging education.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Trever

    One of the best books I have read this year with respect to education. The book goes over key concepts of how these select schools deal with community, empowerment, and contextualizing learning. Great book, every principal and superintendent should read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Johanna Prince

    I enjoy reading profiles of schools and educators who are using promising practices to support students. However, I feel frustrated that we know more about how kids learn, and how we can support them, and we continue to design schools that are not in line with this vision.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Excellent, up-to-date overview of innovative teaching at 8 American schools.

  12. 4 out of 5

    HENRIQUE G DE CASTRO

    Time to change All Educators, parents and people wishing a better education should read this book and question why not all the schools are like those studied in this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Peck

    As a teacher, this is my favorite educational novel that I've ever read. This is a clear and well thought-out vision of the improvement for our educational system. As a teacher, this is my favorite educational novel that I've ever read. This is a clear and well thought-out vision of the improvement for our educational system.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pratiti

    An interesting survey, although I'm not so sure how feasible these ideas are for every school in America. An interesting survey, although I'm not so sure how feasible these ideas are for every school in America.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    371.207 M3857 2014

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Hulse

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ariana

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  20. 5 out of 5

    Connie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Hillman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lily Fesler

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  29. 5 out of 5

    John H

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Cristea

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