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This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three-stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and more robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, and This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three-stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and more robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, and theology. The booklet also recovers the means by which classical educators developed more than just intellectual virtue (by means of the seven liberal arts) but holistically cultivated the mind, body, will, and affections. A must-read for educators wanting to take a second big step toward recovering the tradition of classical education.


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This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three-stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and more robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, and This new booklet introduces readers to a paradigm for understanding classical education that transcends the familiar three-stage pattern of grammar, logic, and rhetoric. Instead, this booklet describes the liberal arts as a central part of a larger and more robust paradigm of classical education that should consist of piety, gymnastic, music, liberal arts, philosophy, and theology. The booklet also recovers the means by which classical educators developed more than just intellectual virtue (by means of the seven liberal arts) but holistically cultivated the mind, body, will, and affections. A must-read for educators wanting to take a second big step toward recovering the tradition of classical education.

30 review for The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    ladydusk

    What I understood, I loved. What I didn't understand ... well, another read will help. This is not the exposition I expected What I understood, I loved. What I didn't understand ... well, another read will help. This is not the exposition I expected

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robbie

    I can’t rate this book yet. So many people much more intelligent than I am love this book and it’s content. While it had some great things to say to me, I’m pretty sure I need to reread it to fully comprehend the entire message.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book gave me a lot of new thoughts, particularly about music in a classical education and about situating science and history in the classical tradition. For me, it has been easier to teach philosophy, literature, history, logic, rhetoric, debate, and composition classically. I'm now inspired to equip myself to teach science and math classically. Perhaps we can inspire our students to be Euclids, Pascals, Newtons, and Einsteins! This book gave me a lot of new thoughts, particularly about music in a classical education and about situating science and history in the classical tradition. For me, it has been easier to teach philosophy, literature, history, logic, rhetoric, debate, and composition classically. I'm now inspired to equip myself to teach science and math classically. Perhaps we can inspire our students to be Euclids, Pascals, Newtons, and Einsteins!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    I thoroughly enjoyed all the information in this book! I feel like this whole new understanding has begun to open up to me. The bibliography and footnotes have led me to add many more books to my to-read list. I’m very thankful these two men took their time to write this. More than likely I’ll not ever use this information to start or administer a Classical school, but these principles are foundational, I feel, to home educating and generally raising children.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I'm giving this 4 stars because it is a powerhouse of theory on the subject. However, it is almost completely lacking in application, and I was disappointed with that. Yes, it is called "A Philosophy of..." but I think it would have made for a stronger presentation of the material to include examples/suggestions/templates of implementation. I'm giving this 4 stars because it is a powerhouse of theory on the subject. However, it is almost completely lacking in application, and I was disappointed with that. Yes, it is called "A Philosophy of..." but I think it would have made for a stronger presentation of the material to include examples/suggestions/templates of implementation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mistie

    A great book that I will go back to frequently.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ladydusk

    Own. I had high hopes for The Liberal Arts Tradition and Clark and Jain did not disappoint. I loved the way they made education - paideia - part of an integrated Christian life rooted in piety and fed by music and the gymnastic. The paradigm of Wonder leading to Worship leading to Work leading to Wisdom is one that can be used in all of life. The chapter on Theology is a masterpiece helping me see how Theology, the queen of sciences, undergirds and forms all other elements of education. This is a b Own. I had high hopes for The Liberal Arts Tradition and Clark and Jain did not disappoint. I loved the way they made education - paideia - part of an integrated Christian life rooted in piety and fed by music and the gymnastic. The paradigm of Wonder leading to Worship leading to Work leading to Wisdom is one that can be used in all of life. The chapter on Theology is a masterpiece helping me see how Theology, the queen of sciences, undergirds and forms all other elements of education. This is a book of education philosophy, so while I can catch glimpses of how it all works, its main failing is the *how* ... the concrete is there for the teacher to build on the foundations. Don't let the length of time it took me to read this concern you, I took a long break from all serious reading for no apparent reason. This book could be read much more quickly. I did bog down in the chapter on Philosophy (Natural, Moral, and Metaphysic) where every sentence was beyond my comprehension, but the rest of the book was approachable and readable. I loved the two illustrations that bookend the book; a tree (planted by streams of living water?) and the climbing of a hill (to Wisdom, Grace, and Virtue) helped me to see how the ideas built on one another. Highly Recommended to Educators of all kinds. Be prepared to be stretched.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Austin Hoffman

    My first impression was reaffirmed in rereading this book. Top shelf summary and overview of classical curriculum with enough meat to satisfy rereadings. The sections on music, piety, and gymnastic provide a memorable map for elementary school teachers, and the sections on the quadrivium and philosophy provide a fantastic enticement for exploration and recovery in the classical tradition. It's a great conversation starter for how to teach the (modern) sciences with an eye to natural philosophy. My first impression was reaffirmed in rereading this book. Top shelf summary and overview of classical curriculum with enough meat to satisfy rereadings. The sections on music, piety, and gymnastic provide a memorable map for elementary school teachers, and the sections on the quadrivium and philosophy provide a fantastic enticement for exploration and recovery in the classical tradition. It's a great conversation starter for how to teach the (modern) sciences with an eye to natural philosophy. This remains one of my top three books on classical education.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Shane

    A good survey of the classical Christian education curriculum, especially as conceived of through the author's PGMAPT framework (Piety, Gymnastic, Music, liberal Arts, Philosophy, Theology). Especial attention is paid to the content integration permitted and encouraged by an historical understanding of these subjects - and the integration with faith, indeed the "classical" as the authors understand it really can't be separated from the "Christian". Some comments especially about the way natural A good survey of the classical Christian education curriculum, especially as conceived of through the author's PGMAPT framework (Piety, Gymnastic, Music, liberal Arts, Philosophy, Theology). Especial attention is paid to the content integration permitted and encouraged by an historical understanding of these subjects - and the integration with faith, indeed the "classical" as the authors understand it really can't be separated from the "Christian". Some comments especially about the way natural science is taught or should be taught were rather disputable I thought, and rushed past very quickly - but it's a survey book, you can't discuss every nuance. A recommended introduction to the classical mindset, with many good thoughts even for "normal" schools not ready to completely overturn the curriculum. "What might it look like once again to comprehend in a single vision what modernity has separated into the objective and merely quantitative realm of scientific knowledge and the radically subjective qualitative realm of love, meaning, and value? It is time that the West once again had a vision for the whole of reality, in which God, His image, and His creation are the interpenetrating centers."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Pitts

    The Christian classical education movement is growing and showing no signs of slowing. But it’s new and many of us are just beginning to discover the heritage we are attempting to recover for the coming generations. This work by Clark and Jain offers a more wholistic, deeper, and better researched explanation of what Christian classical education can and should be than any I have encountered. I heartily recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelty

    Holy cow! What a read. It took me 9 months and still my brain is only grasping the edges. I will need to read it again. But even with the tablespoons that I grasped, this book elevated and expanded my view and vision of what a Christian classical education is and how we go about it as we seek to raise our children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. Highly recommend to anyone who is pursuing a classical Christian eduction for their children, whether in partnership with a school or fully a Holy cow! What a read. It took me 9 months and still my brain is only grasping the edges. I will need to read it again. But even with the tablespoons that I grasped, this book elevated and expanded my view and vision of what a Christian classical education is and how we go about it as we seek to raise our children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. Highly recommend to anyone who is pursuing a classical Christian eduction for their children, whether in partnership with a school or fully at home. So good. So much to think about.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emmeline

    Finally finished this one - and what a book! It held depths of information that I really loved learning about. What a great book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    First, the positives. Clark and Jain state in the introduction that their book is extending the bridge that the contributions of Douglas Wilson's book, Case for Classical Education, and Evans and Littlejohn's book, Wisdom and Eloquence, have made toward repairing the ruins of the classical liberal arts education. I think that they have given Classical educators, whether Boards, Administrators, or Teachers, a wealth of material for reflection, integration, and probably reorientation of their class First, the positives. Clark and Jain state in the introduction that their book is extending the bridge that the contributions of Douglas Wilson's book, Case for Classical Education, and Evans and Littlejohn's book, Wisdom and Eloquence, have made toward repairing the ruins of the classical liberal arts education. I think that they have given Classical educators, whether Boards, Administrators, or Teachers, a wealth of material for reflection, integration, and probably reorientation of their classical and Christian schools. Perhaps most significantly is their integration of Piety, Gymnastic, Music, and Philosophy into the pedagogical course that includes the seven liberal arts (grammar, dialectic, rhetoric, arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy). They also seek to integrate Theology, but I found their sections on theology (the shortest in the book) to be the least developed and compelling. It isn't that I disagreed with their conception of the place of theology, but they did not bring much clarity to the study of theology as a subject, leaving it to be considered as a discipline that provides the grounds for and permeates the rest of the subjects. On the whole though, this is a delightfully fresh and welcomed addition to the literature on classical education and I hope it becomes a required reading for parents and classical educators in Classical schools and homeschools everywhere. Second, the things that could be improved. Though this section is lengthier, it doesn't detract from the tremendous value of this book. In fact, it is because I like this book so much that I hope a second edition comes out that improves some of the things that may turn off the reader who isn't immediately excited about it, or has little or no experience with classical and Christian education. First, a minor quibble. For a book that is outlining a philosophy of Christian Classical Education that values beauty, the layout of the book is underwhelming. The cover is adequate, but inside the margins are too narrow, the blocky highlight quotes that interrupt the text are obtrusive, and the footnotes will be intimidating to anyone who isn't used to reading scholarly literature (or, rather, scholarly literature that uses footnotes rather than endnotes). For the second edition, my humble suggestion would be to widen the margins to at least one inch on the top and bottom, and perhaps 1.25 on the outside edges; eliminate the highlight quotes or relegate them to the margins in a smaller font; turn the footnotes into endnotes, either at the end of chapters or at the end of the book. Second, a second edition should go deeper into explaining the role of theology as a subject at the end of the course of education. If there are implicit theological elements throughout, what sort of "catechetical" knowledge of the Bible, if any, should classical educators provide, and how should theology capstone the entire endeavor at its end? What sort of theological study did the medievals employ? Third, a second edition should expand the appendices. The first appendix was little more than talking points for what promises to be a much more detailed explication of a recurrent theme in the whole book, which is how the late medieval shift in philosophy opened avenues into modernity. The claim is probably an overstatement, or at least needs to integrate other factors, but as it stands in the book, the reader is just left wondering why such an important historical shift is only getting two pages of summary. Appendix II requires explanation. It was not clear to me how exactly the features of the chart were to be used, or what made the chart's contents a narrative. Appendix IV, like Appendix I needs to be expanded, and perhaps integrated with Appendix I since there seems to be some connection between nominalism, voluntarism, and the rejection of two of Aristotle's four causes. Appendix V looks great, so great in fact that it might be better put in the introduction to help the reader see the whole in one image before diving into each particular.

  14. 5 out of 5

    M.G. Bianco

    I wrote the following awhile back, and it has been published on the back cover of this book. Some of us, after having immersed ourselves in the Trivium, thanks to Dorothy Sayers's essay and many other wonderful resources, have found ourselves wondering, What else? We know there are seven liberal arts, including the Quadrivium, and we don't know exactly what to do with these other four, where to go next. Clark and Jain's The Liberal Arts Tradition has the answers, and provides them in a clear, con I wrote the following awhile back, and it has been published on the back cover of this book. Some of us, after having immersed ourselves in the Trivium, thanks to Dorothy Sayers's essay and many other wonderful resources, have found ourselves wondering, What else? We know there are seven liberal arts, including the Quadrivium, and we don't know exactly what to do with these other four, where to go next. Clark and Jain's The Liberal Arts Tradition has the answers, and provides them in a clear, concise, non-partisan way. If you are wondering, What else? then this is one resource you need to have on your bookshelf. I still agree. In fact, my initial comments on the book don't even do the book justice. Clark and Jain tackle, and tackle well, not only the Trivium and Quadrivium, but that which precedes them in the educational process. Then, they take you beyond all of that and into the realm of the natural sciences, natural philosophy, philosophy, and theology. They do all of this with sound reasoning, appeals to pedagogical principles and history, and clear examples. They beg, without pandering, Christians to recover what still lacks in classical, Christian education. If I had a complaint, and I don't, it would be that the book is too short. It is filled with footnotes that I would have liked to see be worked into the text itself, but the book was meant to be a beginning to a larger conversation and that demanded the format we now have. Classical, Christian educators need to read this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eliezer Salazar

    This was a huge undertaking for me, knowing nothing about classical Christian education. It still leaves me feeling I am looking at a wall that is thousands of feet high, and seemingly unattainable. But all I know is that I want something better for my children: for them to know they were created in the image of God, and that they won't find their rest until they find their meaning and rest in Christ, the incarnated Word. All of life and education revolves around Him. I want to point them in all This was a huge undertaking for me, knowing nothing about classical Christian education. It still leaves me feeling I am looking at a wall that is thousands of feet high, and seemingly unattainable. But all I know is that I want something better for my children: for them to know they were created in the image of God, and that they won't find their rest until they find their meaning and rest in Christ, the incarnated Word. All of life and education revolves around Him. I want to point them in all things, whether math, natural or moral philosophy, or anything else to Christ, and to shape their loves around Him. That is all I know. That is what I got out of this book. And man, am I excited! This makes me look forward to teaching them math, science, etc. This has given me a fresh look at education as more than rote learning. Read this book, push through the dense portions, and be encouraged!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara Burt

    Classical education has varied meanings in our culture. This book attempts to recover true classical education through the traditional liberal arts trivium and quadrivium, as well as gymnastics, music, philosophy, and theology: all rooted in piety (defined as "the proper love and fear of God and man"). Since education is the passing down of culture, how we educate our children is the lynchpin for the future. The author beautiful comments, "In conclusion, we should remember that if education is e Classical education has varied meanings in our culture. This book attempts to recover true classical education through the traditional liberal arts trivium and quadrivium, as well as gymnastics, music, philosophy, and theology: all rooted in piety (defined as "the proper love and fear of God and man"). Since education is the passing down of culture, how we educate our children is the lynchpin for the future. The author beautiful comments, "In conclusion, we should remember that if education is enculturation, then we are not just fighting for our schools. We are fighting for the entire culture of Western civilization" (137). If you are new to classical education, then the first half of the book can give you a solid foundation for what it means to classically educate. For veterans, the second half will blow you away and remind you of the beauty of the method.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I read this last year and thought so well of it that when I heard a second edition was coming out, I bought that too so I could read their evolved thinking. (I only read sections of this second edition just now.) Really a thoughtful, helpful book and one that I will reference numerous times in the future.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Wallover

    The challenges which this little bombshell presents to our approaches to school and church are immense. So timely. Intended for school, applications to church need to follow.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Second read - Still hard to understand, especially the philosophy/science sections.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    A little deep reading for this humble Homeschooler. I did appreciate the chapters on virtue and theology, but most of the rest was a little philosophical for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    Really good. Teachers who have been immersed in the Classical education movement in the past 15 years will very much appreciate what the authors have to share here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anita Deacon

    Good enough to forgive them for getting off topic and being a bit preachy at times.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Logan Thune

    Good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Gearhart

    I think I needed a stronger background in philosophy to get more out of this book. I suppose thats all part of pushing myself to learn outside my current intellectual boundaries, and I do think this book is worth a read for those interested in the topic, but I found much more mental fodder in Norms and Nobility by David Hicks and A Philosophy of Education by Charlotte Mason. The Liberal Arts Tradition is well organized and a great first step towards synthesis as well as a corrective in some area I think I needed a stronger background in philosophy to get more out of this book. I suppose thats all part of pushing myself to learn outside my current intellectual boundaries, and I do think this book is worth a read for those interested in the topic, but I found much more mental fodder in Norms and Nobility by David Hicks and A Philosophy of Education by Charlotte Mason. The Liberal Arts Tradition is well organized and a great first step towards synthesis as well as a corrective in some areas for the Christian Classical Renewal. A few favorite quotes: “In our view, the whole of Education ought to proceed from the love of God and neighbor. Education is more than the transference of knowledge, it is the transmission of values, culture, and the proper ordering of loves.” “The musical (coming from the same root word as “museum”) Education was an Education in wonder. It formed the heart and the moral imagination of the youth. The musical education was not primarily or exclusively about instruments and singing. It studied all the subjects inspired by the Muses (from epic poetry to astronomy) in a pre-critical manner. ‘Imitation precedes art’ went the ancient maxim. The musical education, directed toward joyful engagement with reality, offered this imitative foundation for the later learning of the arts and sciences.” “Imagine the possibilities of thinking of these areas of the curriculum as musical education rather than the “grammar of—-.” History would not be so many facts to memorize, however creatively we do it, but an opportunity to use stories from the past to build up a child’s moral imagination—a possibility that, if followed, instantly unlocks the significance of ancient historians. Literature as musical education would resist the modern encroachment of critical reading in order to awaken the same imagination. Science as musical education has perhaps the greatest potential of all, especially in our context. Imagine if the foundations for all future science were a wonder and awe of God’s creation and sympathetic love of a created world. What might later scientific inquiry look like?” “The notion that the primary goal of studying classical languages is something other than the reading of classical texts would have been foreign to earlier generations.” “... dialectic is the art of reasoning through the voluminous material encountered in a thorough musical and grammatical education. Having received and, hopefully, imbibed the deposit of the tradition, students then must learn to weigh, to sort out, and to synthesize the nuanced, paradoxical, and at times contradictory ideas and arguments contained in that tradition.” “By training one’s thoughts on the perfections of mathematics, the mind learns to transcend the level of changing opinions to identify with objective truth.” “The emphasis on proofs in geometry forms wisdom in students....” “Students need the history and philosophy of science in order to process the questions of meaning in natural science. ... This more narrative approach asserts that there is a great conversation that has been going on for millennia even in natural science.” “The central question of moral philosophy therefore is anthropological. What does it mean to be human? What is the nature of man? ... ignoring these questions will only leave them to be answered haphazardly with unacknowledged preconditioned assumptions not adequately reflected upon or understood.”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anda P

    I read this very slowly in the mornings when my brain was fresh. It is quite dense and philosophical. I had so many light bulb moments. Here are a few specific ones. Psychology in the 20th century has focused on making miserable people a little less miserable because this is where the money is. However, there have been no advances or research done on what makes people flourish. People need to have purpose. The bigger the transcendent value that people can attach their lives to, the more meaning I read this very slowly in the mornings when my brain was fresh. It is quite dense and philosophical. I had so many light bulb moments. Here are a few specific ones. Psychology in the 20th century has focused on making miserable people a little less miserable because this is where the money is. However, there have been no advances or research done on what makes people flourish. People need to have purpose. The bigger the transcendent value that people can attach their lives to, the more meaning they have. I would also argue that modern psychologists don’t even address the major problems behind unhappiness- separation from God and sin. It’s interesting that C.S. Lewis has the devil in the Screwtape Letters urge his patient to get into sociology or economics because it was easier to be deceived in those than the hard sciences. Speaking of economics, I have been reading a Bible commentary on Deuteronomy and have been repeatedly disappointed in the contemporary application sections. The author knows his ancient near east but I really disagree when he discusses economics and politics theory and the responsibilities of the different spheres of authority God placed on earth. This book cleared that up for me. Apparently, we have disconnected the study of theology from the study of the other liberal arts and the dialogue that necessarily takes place between them is fraught with the errors of the ignorant. In America we’ve separated the seminary physically from the other colleges. A question I’ve been thinking about for at least a year is how beauty relates to goodness and truth. I believe all 3 have components that are absolutely true. Although it’s controversial, I believe some things are actually ugly, not Beautiful. Beauty captivates people into loving the good and the true. I was listening to a podcast the other day and a Catholic was describing his move to Catholicism from Presbyterianism in his teens and one of the big instigators was the beauty of the cathedral vs many Protestant churches. I also loved the idea of teaching physics by reading primary sources and tracing the history of ideas. I had an excellent physics teacher for 3 years in high school but I feel this way would be better than nearly pure application. Personally, I love philosophy because then I can apply it to my own situation. I get how-tos from other homeschool moms and then decide if it fits with the paradigm I’ve accepted.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Colvin

    This is a helpful foray into the contentious field of the philosophy of classical Christian education, with welcome admonitions about the place of the Quadrivium, the "indispensability of the classical languages," and the need to stop treating the Trivium as "three stages" in the Sayers sense. The central thesis of the book is to argue for a model of classical education that consists of "PGMAPT: piety, gymnastic, music, arts (the liberal arts), philosophy, and theology." Some of these terms (phi This is a helpful foray into the contentious field of the philosophy of classical Christian education, with welcome admonitions about the place of the Quadrivium, the "indispensability of the classical languages," and the need to stop treating the Trivium as "three stages" in the Sayers sense. The central thesis of the book is to argue for a model of classical education that consists of "PGMAPT: piety, gymnastic, music, arts (the liberal arts), philosophy, and theology." Some of these terms (philosophy, theology, music) are defined in unusual ways. The book contains salutary exhortations about the magnitude of the undertaking (that the struggle is for the whole culture) and the need for humility and respectful engagement with secular academia. I am not a Platonist, so I dissent from the authors' insistent metaphysical Realism. It seems to me that we can advocate an education that teaches students the Western tradition and the classical languages without grounding everything in a tendentious Realism. The book is nicely footnoted and sourced, with copious , pithy, and stimulating quotations from authors who were either at the sources of the tradition (Dante, Cicero, Aristotle frequently, Augustine) or were promoters and scholars of the tradition (Jellema, Sayers, CS Lewis, Toynbee, Dennis Quinn).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stefani

    I really, really, really wanted to like this book, and while I found the discussion of the history of classical education fascinating, I felt like the book was too much theory for theory's sake. Also, since the author's are professional classical educators, I found that sometimes their pleas to include such and such in the curriculum or school culture made me feel like I wasn't doing enough, until I realized that it's already integrated with home life and not needed as a separate add on. (Homesc I really, really, really wanted to like this book, and while I found the discussion of the history of classical education fascinating, I felt like the book was too much theory for theory's sake. Also, since the author's are professional classical educators, I found that sometimes their pleas to include such and such in the curriculum or school culture made me feel like I wasn't doing enough, until I realized that it's already integrated with home life and not needed as a separate add on. (Homeschooling for the win.)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Austin Hoffman

    Fantastic. For anyone wanting to get familiar with the Christian classical tradition, this would be my top recommended book. The authors lay out and define numerous key terms and discuss them in through detail. Some of the discussions in the main text and in footnotes may be too complex for newcomers to the tradition, but this remains an excellent introductory and intermediate resource. Those coming into the tradition by way of Dorothy Sayers or ACCS can also greatly benefit from the historical Fantastic. For anyone wanting to get familiar with the Christian classical tradition, this would be my top recommended book. The authors lay out and define numerous key terms and discuss them in through detail. Some of the discussions in the main text and in footnotes may be too complex for newcomers to the tradition, but this remains an excellent introductory and intermediate resource. Those coming into the tradition by way of Dorothy Sayers or ACCS can also greatly benefit from the historical backing and development of the liberal arts as a component of the greater curriculum.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I had a hard time rating this book. I probably would've given it 3 stars as being a generally interesting and thought provoking book. However, it was very poorly designed (why would you layout a book like a blog post?!) and I found much otherwise valuable content not well communicated. So, I downgraded it to a 2. Some really interesting ideas and helpful developments in the classical Christian educational revival, but written for a very narrow audience and not easily accessible to even someone h I had a hard time rating this book. I probably would've given it 3 stars as being a generally interesting and thought provoking book. However, it was very poorly designed (why would you layout a book like a blog post?!) and I found much otherwise valuable content not well communicated. So, I downgraded it to a 2. Some really interesting ideas and helpful developments in the classical Christian educational revival, but written for a very narrow audience and not easily accessible to even someone highly interested in education in general.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    There is so much to think about here. I appreciate all the thought the authors have put into the PGMAPT paradigm. This is a book I will be revisiting for the content and the great bibliography and footnotes. I now have many more books to add to my TBR. I also found the course on the publisher’s website to be very helpful in understanding the authors’ ideas further. I would love to find a syllabus or a list of primary sources Ravi Jain uses in his AP Calculus/Physics integrated class. If anyone k There is so much to think about here. I appreciate all the thought the authors have put into the PGMAPT paradigm. This is a book I will be revisiting for the content and the great bibliography and footnotes. I now have many more books to add to my TBR. I also found the course on the publisher’s website to be very helpful in understanding the authors’ ideas further. I would love to find a syllabus or a list of primary sources Ravi Jain uses in his AP Calculus/Physics integrated class. If anyone knows where I can find that (or something like it), please leave a comment.

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