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This is the fascinating story: William Marshal who negotiated the brutal realities of medieval warfare and the conflicting demands of chivalric ideals, and who against the odds defeated the joint French and rebel forces in arguably the most important battle in mideeval English history - overshadowing even Agincourt. In 1217 England was facing her darkest hour, with foreign This is the fascinating story: William Marshal who negotiated the brutal realities of medieval warfare and the conflicting demands of chivalric ideals, and who against the odds defeated the joint French and rebel forces in arguably the most important battle in mideeval English history - overshadowing even Agincourt. In 1217 England was facing her darkest hour, with foreign troops pillaging the country and defeat close at hand. But, at the battle of Lincoln, the seventy-year-old William Marshal led his men to a victory that would secure the future of his nation. Earl of Pembroke, right-hand man to three kings and regent for a fourth, Marshal was one of the most celebrated men in Europe, yet is virtually unknown today, his impact and influence largely forgotten. In this vivid account, Richard Brooks blends colorful contemporary source material with new insights to uncover the tale of this unheralded icon. He traces the rise of Marshal from penniless younger son to renowned knight, national hero and defender of the Magna Carta.  


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This is the fascinating story: William Marshal who negotiated the brutal realities of medieval warfare and the conflicting demands of chivalric ideals, and who against the odds defeated the joint French and rebel forces in arguably the most important battle in mideeval English history - overshadowing even Agincourt. In 1217 England was facing her darkest hour, with foreign This is the fascinating story: William Marshal who negotiated the brutal realities of medieval warfare and the conflicting demands of chivalric ideals, and who against the odds defeated the joint French and rebel forces in arguably the most important battle in mideeval English history - overshadowing even Agincourt. In 1217 England was facing her darkest hour, with foreign troops pillaging the country and defeat close at hand. But, at the battle of Lincoln, the seventy-year-old William Marshal led his men to a victory that would secure the future of his nation. Earl of Pembroke, right-hand man to three kings and regent for a fourth, Marshal was one of the most celebrated men in Europe, yet is virtually unknown today, his impact and influence largely forgotten. In this vivid account, Richard Brooks blends colorful contemporary source material with new insights to uncover the tale of this unheralded icon. He traces the rise of Marshal from penniless younger son to renowned knight, national hero and defender of the Magna Carta.  

30 review for The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    As the country heads towards a date with destiny and the celebration of the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta in 1215, it's inevitable that the movers and shakers of that age will see their history step into the spotlight, and perhaps none more so than the great William Marshal. Largely unknown outside the circles of medievalists and re-eanactors until recently, he is now beginning to enter the mainstream consciousness as evinced by a couple of recent BBC2 documentaries about his e As the country heads towards a date with destiny and the celebration of the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta in 1215, it's inevitable that the movers and shakers of that age will see their history step into the spotlight, and perhaps none more so than the great William Marshal. Largely unknown outside the circles of medievalists and re-eanactors until recently, he is now beginning to enter the mainstream consciousness as evinced by a couple of recent BBC2 documentaries about his extraordinary life and some new biographies to add to the three already out there - We have to wait until December for Thomas Asbridge's offering, but this one by Richard Brooks is available now. Despite the title's sub-text that it's about 'William Marshal and the French invasion of 1217', the book is actually a fairly thorough biography of William's life. It does concentrate on the pivotal campaign of 1217 for approximately the last third of the book, but that leaves plenty of room to write a substantial biography to bring William to that point. The author has plenty of scope to explore the making of the man who was destined to lead the battle against the French invaders and begin the process of reuniting the country and setting it back on its feet after years of devastating unrest during the reign of King John. Had the Battle of Lincoln been won by the French in 1217, the country would have had a very different story today. William Marshal's victory was one of those destiny moments, something that Brooks squarely acknowledges and keeps at the forefront of his narrative. Not including a glossary, bibliography and index, the book is 300 pages long and details William's story in succinct but never skimpy detail from cradle to grave. There are some excellent and unusual colour plates mid book, which add value and interest to the narrative and are a cut above the usual suspects. There are some very useful tables with content such as lengths of marches undertaken, the number of campaigns William fought in, his known tournament record. The straight narrative details of William's life are interspersed with fascinating facts. I did not know for example that soap was used as a weapon in medieval warfare - to make the decks of enemy vessels slippery, or that a live bear was presented as a prize at at tourney in 1215. Personally I love whimsies like this and it added enormously to my enjoyment of the work and kept me turning the pages. I have read all of the Marshal biographies out there,including the 13th century Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal, and have studied the man in depth myself for 10 years, albeit to recreate him in novel form. This work is a very fine addition to the oeuvre. Richard Brooks understands the Marshal and brings out facets largely ignored by his other biographers. Brooks' Marshal is a talented military commander, shrewd, and well able to grasp the complexities of a situation from all angles. He's a statesman too. It's not war for war's sake but he will not shirk from fighting if he must and he understands tactics very well, including subterfuge. Reading Richard Brooks' fine, lucid and erudite prose, one is given a view of the Marshal in full, sharp clarity. Personally I feel that this biography of the Marshal comes the closest of all of them to understanding the man. There is not a great deal about his family life, but that is perhaps a facet for another biographer to tackle. The main thrust of this book is his military and diplomatic career and it is written with vivid, insight. It is not without its moments of questionable history, however, and outright gaffs and it is a case of being wary and not taking everything as gospel. I was irritated by Brooks' constant referral to William's father as a 'weathercock' and 'disreputable baronial backwoodsman'. Indeed, I underlined the latter and wrote NO! in capital letters beside it. . John the Marshal changed sides just once in the war between Stephen and Matilda and in the early stages - rather like Matildine stalwart Brian FitzCount and all the others who swore to Stephen at the outset of the reign. That's not being a weathercock. He put his life on the line for the Empress at Wherwell and lost an eye, and then again at Newbury where he sacrificed his son in order to buy time for Wallingford. The lord of Wallingford, Brian FitzCount had vanished to become a monk, leaving John Marshal to stand alone. And as to being a backwoodsman - he was the King's Marshal. He controlled the Kennet Valley. Professor Crouch says of him 'He was no coarse bandit. He was more of a baron than a robber...He played the great game of politics with talent and perception...a preudhomme or 'man of standing' in his son's eyes.' With his marriage to Sybilla of Salisbury, he became brother in law to a French prince, the man next in line to the French throne. There's also the perplexing remark that William spoke English at home and didn't learn French until he went to train as a squire. That's blatantly wrong. The nobility spoke a version of French - Anglo Norman and it was William's first language. How on earth would he have managed in Stephen's camp among all those French speaking nobles if it wasn't his native tongue too? He possibly had a smattering of English but his first language was French. So that's one detail to take with a huge pinch of salt. Brooks says that William was called William to curry favour with his more illustrious relatives on his mother's side. He doesn't seem to have noticed that John Marshal had a brother called William, the vicar of Cheddar in Somerset who was actually Empress Matilda's chancellor, so it was a family name on both sides. Again, it indicates that the research might have been more thorough in this area. He also seems to think that William's father thought it a waste of time for William to learn to read and write, but that seems a strange conclusion to arrive at when William's father himself is indicated to be a literate man and would have known very well the value of literacy. Several times it is mentioned that William spent decades as a household knight. Literally speaking that might be true, but he was much more than that. A royal marshal was more than just a household knight. He was head of his employer's military office and responsible for the logistics of transport and security. Lesser men answered to him. To all intents, William became the Young King's Marshal in 1170 and developed from there, so I feel that the idea is to emphasis William's humble beginnings in an effort to show to what heights he rose, but in fact, while not exactly graced with privilege he didn't have to work in the bilges for all that long, and he came from good money, not the 'backwoods.' I would also say that William is not dreaming at peace in the Temple Church, although it's a nice fancy. He and his Templar colleagues are there armed and ready for battle. They are alert and on guard, waiting to fight at the Last Judgement because they are lying in a satellite of Jerusalem on earth where that battle will begin. If colour and paint remained, their eyes would be wide open. A final item I cannot let pass even if it is a nitpick (there are others but I've let them be) is the comment that William addresses the young future Louis VIII 'amorously' by calling him a 'demoiselle.' However, a 'demoiselle' in Anglo Norman is just a young person - in the male case an untried bachelor knight. So William isn't addressing him amorously. He's an old, wise man, calling the other one a young whippersnapper - a different nuance entirely! Despite the above caveats and nit-picks THE KNIGHT WHO SAVED ENGLAND is going straight onto my keeper shelf and will be referred to and re-read. When Richard Brooks is on solid ground and covering the military aspects, this work shines a light into areas no other Marshal biographer has illuminated in the same way. The insights hold the ring of truth and Richard Brooks obviously understands his man very well indeed - and I would venture to say better than any of the Marshal's other biographers have done. He recognises the Marshal as a competent, gifted soldier and statesman through to the core against whom other national heroes 'appear hollow in comparison.' Exactly. This is highly recommended reading for anyone interested in the history of the Middle Ages and a must for the legions of William Marshal fans out there. Disclaimer. Osprey books were kind enough to send me a review copy. I don't usually review ARCS but I wasn't going to say no to this one - and I'm glad I did read it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: ARC read via Netgalley. William Marshall is not as well known in the United States as he should be, considering the Constitution’s connection to the Magna Carter. This is a shame because, if Brooks is correct, Marshall is the reason why this realm England was around. Brooks’ book about Marshall is not a biography, at least not in the strictest sense of the world. It is a close look at the times as well as the military aspects of the Marshall. The focus is mostly on the fight against Disclaimer: ARC read via Netgalley. William Marshall is not as well known in the United States as he should be, considering the Constitution’s connection to the Magna Carter. This is a shame because, if Brooks is correct, Marshall is the reason why this realm England was around. Brooks’ book about Marshall is not a biography, at least not in the strictest sense of the world. It is a close look at the times as well as the military aspects of the Marshall. The focus is mostly on the fight against France after the death of John I. Therefore the battle at Lincoln gets a huge portion of the book devoted it to it. This is fine. It is nice to see that the battle at Lincoln is getting more historical recognition, more than say an aside in Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives. When not dealing with Lincoln, Brooks details the tournament culture as well as the culture of war at the time. It isn’t a history of the Plantangents, but a history of the times and the Marshall’s role in them. The book includes pictures, several of which capture the climb to Lincoln Castle, and climb really is the only word for it. In terms of accessibility, the book is accessible for anyone with a basic knowledge of the times (in particular the infighting in Henry II’s family). Brooks presumes you know enough background, and he uses more detailed cases and battles to make and prove his argument. If you have not read about the Marshall’s times before or even if you have read Elizabeth Chadwick’s books about him (or Crowe’s Robin Hood), you should read a more general history before this book. Crossposted at Booklikes

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    One of the more interesting aspects of English history is the myth that the English Channel has formed a strong barrier against foreign invasion. This is definitely not the case. If we look at the history of Anglo-Saxon England, for example, England was repeatedly invaded by the Norse. In two occasions, most famously in 1066 and less famously in 1016, defeat of the reigning English monarch led to the conquest of England and its rule by foreigners who held it as part of a larger continental empir One of the more interesting aspects of English history is the myth that the English Channel has formed a strong barrier against foreign invasion. This is definitely not the case. If we look at the history of Anglo-Saxon England, for example, England was repeatedly invaded by the Norse. In two occasions, most famously in 1066 and less famously in 1016, defeat of the reigning English monarch led to the conquest of England and its rule by foreigners who held it as part of a larger continental empire. This does not even begin to discuss the various successful invasions of England that have sprung from the continent, as in 1471, 1485 and 1689. The case of 1217 is like those latter three cases in that the foreign invasion involved was the result of division within England leading to the invitation of a foreign invasion, in this case by the Dauphin Louis VII of France. Yet the defeat of this foreign invasion which nearly destroyed the Angevin empire and almost toppled the Plantagenet dynasty and replaced it with French rule is little known or remembered in England today, except by those of us who are particularly fond of the bravery and motivating skill and tactical brilliance of one obscure William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, and reluctant but highly competent royal servant. This book is a sizable one at about 300 pages with a few lengthy chapters full of excellent source criticism and a sizable amount of context. This book begins with a list of illustrations, preface, introduction, chronologies, and maps. After this the book proper begins with a look at the struggle over the Angevin inheritance that occurred within the Plantagenet family as well as between them and the French rulers who were continually interested in taking over Angevin territory within France (and eventually beyond) as well as the childhood of William Marshal in the contentious times of the Anarchy (1). After that comes a look at the rise of Marshal as a result of his skill as a knight in tournaments (2). This is followed by a discussion of his loyal service to Henry II as well as Richard Lionheart (3), where he was able to secure his own interests as well as the approval of the crown under difficult circumstances where he showed himself loyal and shrewd. After that the author discusses the conflict between King John and the French Dauphin (4), where King John repeatedly fell short. This is followed by a look at William's conduct during the war against the Barons that was before and during and after the granting of the Magna Carta (5). Finally, after 200 pages of lead-up, the author talks about Marshal's successful leadership in the Battle of Lincoln (6) as well as the naval Battle of Sandwich (7) that led to the treaty of Kingston that got the French out of England. At this point the author discusses the repercussions of Marshal's victory for England and his own family (8), and there is a glossary, select bibliography, and index to close the book. As is common in a book of this kind, the author spends a lot more time setting up the context of the Battle of Lincoln and the decisive naval Battle of Sandwich that gave William Marshal a lasting claim to be among the most patriotic heroes of English military history, an elderly man who had served five monarchs and who, in the final years of his life, rose up once again to defend his nation from enemies foreign and domestic to preserve England for the young and not really appreciative Henry III. While this might be tedious in lesser hands or about less interesting subjects, William Marshal is a compelling enough subject that the reader is likely not to mind reading about the course of Marshal's long and productive life or the author's interest in sources, not least the lengthy epic poem about Marshal's life commissioned by his son, because those areas are interesting enough in their own right to be well worth reading even if the reader is curious to know how it is that an elderly knight from a somewhat poor and disreputable background as the younger son of a near-bandit became a savior of England while being old enough to collect retirement benefits (if such a thing existed in Plantagenet England). And that is a story well worth telling and reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melisende

    The chronicler Roger of Wendover, who wrote an account of events (Flower of History trans by JA Ggiles London 1849), said … “This battle, which, in derision of Louis and the barons, they called “The Fair,” took place on the 19th of May, which was on the Saturday in Whitsun-week; it commenced between the first and third hour, and was finished by these good managers before the ninth." This then is the back-drop to Richard Brooks’ book, The Knight Who Saved England. He was "marshal and then regent of The chronicler Roger of Wendover, who wrote an account of events (Flower of History trans by JA Ggiles London 1849), said … “This battle, which, in derision of Louis and the barons, they called “The Fair,” took place on the 19th of May, which was on the Saturday in Whitsun-week; it commenced between the first and third hour, and was finished by these good managers before the ninth." This then is the back-drop to Richard Brooks’ book, The Knight Who Saved England. He was "marshal and then regent of England who served four English monarchs as a royal adviser and agent and as a warrior of outstanding prowess." Needless to say, the life and character of William Marshal is extraordinary and you will find a list of further reading at the end of Brooks’ book..

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    This is a fascinating historical account of "the greatest knight", a man whose skills elevated him to status beyond his birth. William Marshal served four kings, including acting as regent for a time during Henry III's youth. An engrossing read and, though I can understand why it might have been distracting to some, I actually appreciated the author's interruption of narrative to compare the merits (and potential biases) of contrasting accounts of events in Marshal's life passed down from his con This is a fascinating historical account of "the greatest knight", a man whose skills elevated him to status beyond his birth. William Marshal served four kings, including acting as regent for a time during Henry III's youth. An engrossing read and, though I can understand why it might have been distracting to some, I actually appreciated the author's interruption of narrative to compare the merits (and potential biases) of contrasting accounts of events in Marshal's life passed down from his contemporaries. I was less interested in the military history portion of the narrative(details of battle locations, tactics, and equipment) but not enough to skip over them. Finally, the illustrations and photographs of the surviving castles that figured in Marshal's life made me eager to take a "castles tour" of the United Kingdom.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Powers

    Book Review by: Sharon Powers. If you would like to see this review with all the graphics included, please see it at my blog at: http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ _____________________________________________ Robin Hood and his band of merry men? Yes, probably most of us have seen Robin Hood movies, or read books, seen plays, or poured over the comics to enjoy the story of the injustices of John's taxation of the poor people. And, of course, Robin Hood's antics as he robbed the rich and gave Book Review by: Sharon Powers. If you would like to see this review with all the graphics included, please see it at my blog at: http://sharonsloveofbooks.blogspot.com/ _____________________________________________ Robin Hood and his band of merry men? Yes, probably most of us have seen Robin Hood movies, or read books, seen plays, or poured over the comics to enjoy the story of the injustices of John's taxation of the poor people. And, of course, Robin Hood's antics as he robbed the rich and gave to the poor. So, like many others, I am generally familiar with the era in which Robin Hood lived, Richard the Lionheart, John, the king that followed Richard, an era of knights in armor, beautiful ladies, chivalry, kings and courts and the honor or dishonor that could attach to one of the players. I remember studying the middle ages in grade school, learning about the peasants and how they labored long for little. Our teacher explained how the feudal system worked so, as students, we could reach a basic understanding of people and life in the middle ages. One spin-off of the classic story of Ivanhoe, by Sir Wal- ter Scott, is the Classics Illustrated version. [2] Since I lived out in the country while I was growing up, I was able to see country life with a variety of animals all around me. This rural life allowed me to own my very own horse--a black Quarter Horse mare, I called Beauty. Like many young women I loved horses and would read anything about the beautiful animals, not the least of which was about the knights and their horses. As many of you already know from reading past posts, one of my favorite books was written by the author, Sir Walter Scott, and is entitled, Ivanhoe. Ivanhoe, is set in twelfth century England while Richard the Lionheart is, yet, king. [2] In Robin Hood (2010), starring Russell Crowe, Max Von Sydow, and Cate Blanchett, William Hurt takes on the role of William Marshal. While the movie was a fun watch for most, it was, none- theless, roundly criticized for its historical inaccuracies. [3] So, whether it is Robin Hood or Ivanhoe who captures your fancy, William Marshal was the one who transcended his own country's history to leave an indelible mark on the world. As we begin discussing William Marshal through Richard Brooks' book, let's start by taking a look at a brief synopsis of The Knight Who Saved England. BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF THE BOOK: We've already learned that William Marshal is a man of the middle ages. Why should we care about someone who lived so very long ago and has nothing to do with today? Well, my answer is Richard Brooks' book, itself. That is to say, Brook's book explains to us why William Marshal is really a man for all centuries. In short, it has to do with the rights of the common man. This is one angle of the walls of Lin- coln Castle, castle where Marshal won his greatest victory. Note the steep in- cline approaching the castle walls. It is no small wonder the French had to set siege to the castle. [4] Brooks shows us a man who lived during a brutal time of medieval warfare and growing concepts of chivalry and nobility. Marshal faced the betrayal by his countrymen, rebel English forces who had allied themselves with the French. In England's darkest hour, Marshal was called upon to stop the French and rebel troops from pillaging the country. Marshal led the campaign, culminating in the siege of Lincoln in 1217, earning a victory of more import, perhaps, than even that of Agincourt. In politics, Marshal had to walk a medieval tightrope and not only survived, but thrived. Moreover, as the "right-hand man to three kings and regent for a fourth," he also campaigned for and defended the rights of the common man and the Magna Carta. This image is a copy of the Papal Bull annulling the Magna Carta. In it, Pope Innocent III calls the Magna Carta, "shameful and demeaning." [5] King John never intended to honor his sealing of the Magna Carta in 1215, since he viewed the signing as having been coerced and unlawful. An appeal to the Pope by John resulted in the document being deemed null and void. John's rejection of the document was short-lived, how- ever, for after his death (1216), his son ascended to the throne. A child of nine years, King Henry III, won a bid for Marshal's protection and support. In 1217, Marshal, vowing to protect the young king, began the last period of his life as Regent of England. It was then, as he became regent to the young king, that Marshal issued the edict and made law of, none other than, the Magna Carta. WHAT I THINK OF THIS BOOK: First, I think it ironic that a man of such stature has no famous quotes with which to be remembered--but his father does. John Marshal, father of William Marshal, had given his son in ransom to King Stephen as a surity to relinquish his castle. Stephen used what time he had, instead, to reinforce his castle. The Magna Carta. [7] Then, when Stephen ordered Marshal to surrender his castle, John Marshal called his bluff. He was reported as having said to King Stephen, "I still have the hammer and anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" [6] It is ironic, because long before I ever heard of William Marshal, I had heard of John Marshal and his words to a besieging King. Instead, we remember William Marshal for the things he did rather than for what he said. Second, it cannot be doubted that no topic for a book could be much better than William Marshal. It really is wonderful to see more attention brought to this historically important person. I hope Marshal's importance continues to be more appreciated and more people grow to learn of his life. So, Richard Brooks really could do no better in my book than to select Marshal for his subject matter. Technical Considerations: (1) The very first technical consideration we will look at today is, "What was the author's main purpose in writing a book about William Marshal, and did he accomplish his objective?" Richard Brooks tells us in the INTRODUCTION, that he wrote the book to "reconsider" England's forgotten champi- on, William Marshal, as the author looks forward to the Battle at Lincoln's 800th anniversary (May 20, 1217 to May 20, 2017). I would say Brooks' objective was met, in that he wrote and published the book about William Marshal and the French Invasion of 1217 in anticipation of the 800 year anniversary of the culmination of the victory over the French at Lincoln. His book is also a good way to spread the word about William Marshal and the exemplary life he led and the legacy he left to the world. (2) Since this is a nonfiction book, alternatively listed as military history, we must next ask whether or not the facts that the author, Richard Brooks, shared with us in this title, The Knight Who Saved England, are accurate. Since this is a scholarly work, Brooks has documented both his primary and secondary sources at the back of the book. Additionally, Brooks has listed the publishing company, and provided contact information. This image is one included in Richard Brooks' book, The Knight Who Saved England. This graphic is a 13th Century image of the Battle at Lincoln. An archer shoots at the fleeing French knights. [8] I have not checked Mr. Brooks' sources personally, and leave that to someone with more time to do such things than the little time I have. Moreover, since I am not a scholar on William Marshal, I cannot say with any authority whether everything Mr. Brooks presented is wholly accurate. However, on the face of things, it appears to me that Mr. Brooks' not only has considerable personal knowledge about William Marshal, but that he has completed exhaustive research into the background of this historic individual. (3) Our third consideration is the target audience...just who are they? It seems most apparent that the target audience is those appreciating military history, or history in general. Other offshoots could include those interested in medieval history, royalty, war reenactors, armor, mail and weapon reproduction specialists, those interested in politics, law, or strategic alliances. I, of course, fit into none of those categories. Instead, I am a simple book reviewer who happens to love horses, knights, and the era in which they existed. From Richard Brooks book, The Knight Who Saved England, Brooks says, this image is of a group of "[c]losely formed conrois of knights pursu[ing] fleeing opponents with lances couch- ed for impact. Mail shirts are longer than [they were] at Hastings, but helmets remain open. One knight (left) has lowered his lance to finish off a dismounted enemy." [9] (4) Consideration four concerns any extra features that may add to either the appreciation of the story or book, or its under- standing. Some might even include whether or not these added features made the book more attractive. Since this book is an ebook, such features are not under consideration since we have no cover, dust jacket, or glossy illustrated inserts. However, Richard Brooks has included a number of features that makes the book both easier to understand and also helps the reader to visualize the period or the point Brooks attempts to make. The extras Brooks has included are as follows: A Preface and an Introduction that helps explain the book to get the basics down. For example, a section on medieval money. I found the Introduction to be most helpful!; A chronology of events aids the reader in keeping events straight; A series of maps showing locations and layouts of strategic areas; A Glossary to include important terms; A list of Select Bibliography for checking references; A list of Illustrations (Plate Section): Full color plates of various scenes, people, and events. I found the full color graphic images beautiful and well selected for the book. They were quite enjoyable and I spent a goodly amount of time perusing the images. Because of the extras, I think this book might be a helpful addition to a public library, or perhaps a university library for those who wish to do research into English history or William Marshal. The image is a representation of the stone effigy of William Marshal. As you look at the close-up of the face you see the dam- age the stone received as a result of the Blitz (WWII). [10] (5) Our fifth consideration is to ask whether or not the book was interesting and held the reader's attention. I've already commented, above, that the topic itself is interesting. William Marshal is a superb topic! Moreover, it is not overdone and seen every- where. Now as far as the topic, the topic held my attention; however, Richard Brooks intellectual style may not appeal to everyone. Since this book is not a novel, we don't get to see character develop- ment. That is we don't really know what William Marshal thought or felt. Also, as I mentioned, above, we do not get dialog or quotes from Marshal, but straight out action. We see what he has done. We are not only asking whether or not the topic is interesting, but whether or not the book is interesting, as written. Mr. Brooks is obviously an intelligent, and erudite persoyn. His book is apparently well-researched and documented. I have to say, however his writing style in presenting factual information seemed to digress or meander from the path before culminating in the paragraph or chapter's thesis. At places I felt a bit lost, and sometimes the material seemed dry because the information about the surrounding cast of characters or events may have been a bit too much when describing the background information or family lineages. My attention wandered a bit and I felt it bogged down, just a bit. For this reason, I don't feel I can recommend this book to younger readers. This is the coat of arms adopted by William Marshal. [5] (6) The sixth consideration is what about the book is its greatest value to the reader? Is there anything that would make it especially worthwhile? Obviously, the greatest value is to learn about William Marshal. To read about him and his life makes it easier to understand the legacy he left to the world in his contribution to the the Magna Carta and the rule of law that had been undertaken. Marshal's life of honor and dedication to higher principles can demonstrate that real people exist to make things like freedom and law come into being. Learning about his role in the Magna Charta was lovely; equally as enjoyable was to learn just how many things in which he took part that were notable and important throughout the course of his whole life. The following short list is just a few important things from the life of William Marshal that I learned about in Richard Brooks' book. Eleanor of Aquitaine. [5] William saved the life of Eleanor of Acquitane, being injured and getting captured in the process; William fought Richard the Lionheart on the field of battle--he avoided killing his future king by aiming his lance at Richard's horse and killing it, instead; At age 70 (roughly), William was summoned to defend the kingdom one more time and won a great victory at the 1217 battle at Lincoln; William negotiated a truce between the barons (nobles) and King John; William encouraged the creation of the Magna Carta and fought for it until his death; William pledged himself to the nine-year-old King Henry III, with tears in his eyes, pledging to care for the fragile king; William reissued the Magna Carta after John had it revoked and placed his seal as Regent on the document. CONCLUSION AND RATING: I am glad that I read Richard Brooks' book, The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217. I enjoyed the book and learned some important facts about William Marshal; in conclusion, I find that I can recommend this book to those who love or are interested in history, military history, reenactors, weapon or armour forgers, William Marshal, Richard the Lionheart, John, Henry III, battle strategists, The Magna Carta, those interested in law and human rights, Runnymede (location of Magna Carta signing), Thomas Comte de Perche (French forces commander killed at Lincoln), Nicola de Haye (female Castellan and protector of the castle at Lincoln and pro-John supporter) and those in education, research, or higher learning. I am sure others will be interested in this book, as well. I cannot recommend this book to younger readers or those who have reading difficulties as Brooks writing tends to digress and meander before going back to topic. [12] As to the rating, I find that given all the above information, I am very happy to award 4.0 stars out of 5 to this book. Congratulations to Richard Brooks on his informative new book. [13] Thank you for joining me this week as we delved into history with a man who was called "The Greatest Knight Whoever Lived." Richard Brooks presented an informative and well-documented book. Please join me again, next week, as we take up another book from a different genre. I hope you join me, then. Today we do not live in the Middle Ages, mankind has grown and worked to establish laws and justice systems to treat human beings fairly. Please be fair to everyone with which you do business and try to keep your honor in your daily life like William Marshal--a man for all ages. Until next time . . . . . . many happy pages of reading! This flower is a white with red center, Rose of Sharon. [14] My best to you all. Sharon. ________________________________________________________ REFERENCES/RESOURCES [1] "The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217." [richard brooks] smile.amazon.com. Retrieved 11-08-15. [2] "Ivanhoe." [walter scott] smile.amazon.com. Retrieved 11-13-15. [3] "Robin Hood: Production Reins Over Story." [diana saenger] reviewexpress.com. Retrieved 11-09-15. [4] "Nichola de la Haye, England's Forgotten Heroine." [sharon bennett connolly; 12-11-15] historytheinterestingbits.com. retrieved 11-14-15. [5] "William Marshal - The Flower of Chivalry." medievalwarfare.info. Retrieved 11-18-15. [6] "This Day in History: [June 15,] 1215 Magna Carta Sealed." history.com. Retrieved 11-14-15. [7] "William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke." en.wikipedia.org. Retrieved 11-14-15. [8] "The Battle of Lincoln (1217), According to Roger of Wendover." [drm_peter; 03-24-14] deremilitari.org. Retrieved 11-15-15. [9] "Manuscript Miniatures." trekearth.com. Retrieved 11-17-15. [10] "Elizabeth Chadwick: Living the History." livingthehistoryelizabethchadwick.blogspot.com. Retrieved 11-18-15. [11] "White Rose of Sharon Gifts." zazzle.com. Retrieved 11-09-15. [12] "How to Pitch the Top 50 'New Product Review' Bloggers." publicityhound.com. Retrieved 11-18-15. [13] "28 Honor Quotes to Live By." boredomlava.com. Retrieved 11-18-15. [14] "White Rose of Sharon Gifts." zazzle.com. Retrieved 11-18-15. [*] "NetGalley." NetGalley.com. Retrieved 11-18-15.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth G. Perkin

    The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217 is a balanced, factual and comprehensive reference to the life and times of a man who was said to embody prowess, loyalty and wisdom. Opening with a pivotal scene that captures The Second Battle of Lincoln that then launches into a broad scope of the maelstrom of politics and key opponents of England and France during the 12th century and early 13th century, the historical enthusiast is sure to learn something from this The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217 is a balanced, factual and comprehensive reference to the life and times of a man who was said to embody prowess, loyalty and wisdom. Opening with a pivotal scene that captures The Second Battle of Lincoln that then launches into a broad scope of the maelstrom of politics and key opponents of England and France during the 12th century and early 13th century, the historical enthusiast is sure to learn something from this work. Whether the reader is more interested in the politics, hierarchy of battle and knights, major points illustrated from the height of the jousting tournament circuit, or just has a desire to learn about the knight named William Marshal; there is a portion dedicated to your interest. The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217, removes the romantic notions of William Marshal and concentrates on the battle prowess and prudent loyalty toward four kings and demonstrates these for the reader with a collection of battles, sieges and exploits in a detailed manner that breaks momentarily with fascinating photographs and ends with a useful glossary of terms. Although the facts can overwhelm, become a little dry and this collection may not be necessarily suited toward a novice of this time period (it may help those interested to please explore some historical fiction titles/series such as: Sharon Kay Penman's Plantagenet Series or even Elizabeth Chadwick's William Marshall series (if the reader desires more of the romanticized version of the chivalrous knight) to spark an interest for these complicated centuries, acquaint themselves with the key players of the strive and politics of the era, build a character and mental image for a name before attempting more detailed examinations with nonfiction titles such as this one). A wonderful journey of discovery awaits the reader if they wish to start with this small and incomplete list of reads (there are so many to explore), and then the trove of trivia will continue if the reader comes back to this title. Still from front to back this reference is a wonderful addition for those interested in the history of combat and strategy (concentrated on the 12th century to the early 13th century), medieval enthusiasts or those who wish to learn more details about a man who went from a child hostage who entertained a king with playing jackstraws who then grew into a young knight who dominated the tournament circuit for 18 years who finally became a legendary figure who saved England (by intelligence, courage and character) and helped shape futures and liberties of generations; this is your next read. *I would like to thank Osprey Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and enjoy The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Johnston

    William Marshall was a man whose life spanned more than seven decades, five of which he served Kings, Princes and most of all England. Born mid twelfth century, a younger son, he was a pawn when taken hostage at age 5. Even then his wit and personality saw him through his minority in one piece. He became a knight who was ransomed by none other than Eleanor of Acquitaine, he served Henry II, the young king, Richard I, John and finally Henry III as Regent to the boy king. Not always on the side of William Marshall was a man whose life spanned more than seven decades, five of which he served Kings, Princes and most of all England. Born mid twelfth century, a younger son, he was a pawn when taken hostage at age 5. Even then his wit and personality saw him through his minority in one piece. He became a knight who was ransomed by none other than Eleanor of Acquitaine, he served Henry II, the young king, Richard I, John and finally Henry III as Regent to the boy king. Not always on the side of whomever was in power, somehow he traversed the political maelstroms of his time to emerge as prudent counsel and admired soldier and politician. The book tells his story using contemporary writings that have surfaced from the murkiness of history. Brooks often builds his story by using several versions to reinforce truth from fiction. Rather than using footnotes, he puts his sources into his narrative which makes for a much smoother read. Despite the fact that Marshall is not as well remembered as many lesser people of history, it was he, who after the debacle that was King John, held the monarchy together by protecting Henry III, bringing the divided factions together and defeating the French in their attempt (and a close call it was) to annex England. He was not a man without flaws but he comes across as a wise, loyal and decent man who saved England. Men, or women, such as he are far too few in history and sadly absent today.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donna Maguire

    I have always been intigued by William Marshal ever since I read a wonderful work of historical fiction on him some years back, so I was naturally keen to know more about the real man, the one the author of this work entitled "The Knight who saved England". I was not disappointed at all, the book details some of the extraordinary feats that Marshal ot involved in from being held prisoner as a young boy, through to running the country as stand in ruler for the young king. The lived during a very I have always been intigued by William Marshal ever since I read a wonderful work of historical fiction on him some years back, so I was naturally keen to know more about the real man, the one the author of this work entitled "The Knight who saved England". I was not disappointed at all, the book details some of the extraordinary feats that Marshal ot involved in from being held prisoner as a young boy, through to running the country as stand in ruler for the young king. The lived during a very busy time, under various rulers and got to travel to many countries. His story is every bit exciting and adventurous as I was led to believe and this work of non fiction tells his story with great detail that keeps the reader captivated. I was able to review this book from the publishers in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Davies

    Really fascinating insight into a little known name from English history. Really only seen his character once in popular fiction about the period. This gives a view of the world in early medieval English history at an important time when the late Norman influence begins to focus more on England per se, as the French retake land on the continent. It's well written, easy to follow and makes a logical progression. Really fascinating insight into a little known name from English history. Really only seen his character once in popular fiction about the period. This gives a view of the world in early medieval English history at an important time when the late Norman influence begins to focus more on England per se, as the French retake land on the continent. It's well written, easy to follow and makes a logical progression.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Pickstone

    This reads easily and is riveting on the subject of the warfare. In fact, on that subject, outstandingly good! I found on other issues the author seemed to take the accepted line rather than question it, which weakened the book overall - in my view! - as it appeared to demonstrate to me that he had only researched the warfare and just regurgitated other 'facts' as presented by other authors. This reads easily and is riveting on the subject of the warfare. In fact, on that subject, outstandingly good! I found on other issues the author seemed to take the accepted line rather than question it, which weakened the book overall - in my view! - as it appeared to demonstrate to me that he had only researched the warfare and just regurgitated other 'facts' as presented by other authors.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    A good look at an interesting period of English history, using the career of William Marshal as its backbone. I feel I should have liked this book more than I did, and I did enjoy it, as the author does an excellent job of drawing information from sparse and contradictory sources. Perhaps it is his arguments with some of the authors of the sources? I am not sure. Still, very worthwhile reading for a transitional state of English history when it moved from being a mixed European power to just bein A good look at an interesting period of English history, using the career of William Marshal as its backbone. I feel I should have liked this book more than I did, and I did enjoy it, as the author does an excellent job of drawing information from sparse and contradictory sources. Perhaps it is his arguments with some of the authors of the sources? I am not sure. Still, very worthwhile reading for a transitional state of English history when it moved from being a mixed European power to just being the British isles.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim O'Sullivan

    An interesting story about a little known individual This is a great introduction to a period which seemed to have some great characters such as William Marshall, Eustace the Monk, Will of the Weald and others who had a direct input into the French invasion of England in 1217, a subject which should be more well known

  14. 4 out of 5

    M. Chandler

    wonderfully researched and action packed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Interesting, but extremely dry.

  16. 4 out of 5

    jeand99

    Three years on a tiny spot on planet Earth a long time ago: * Year 1066. Battle of Hastings. William the Conqueror from Normandy conquered England * Year 1204. Battle of Bouvins. The Angevins lost Normandy * Year 1217. Battle of Lincoln. French lost foothold on England For 150 years the English Channel was an internal waterway for the 'homo sapiens' who had land, houses etcetera in both countries we now call "France" and "United Kingdom". Back then it was one country for William the Conqueror and hi Three years on a tiny spot on planet Earth a long time ago: * Year 1066. Battle of Hastings. William the Conqueror from Normandy conquered England * Year 1204. Battle of Bouvins. The Angevins lost Normandy * Year 1217. Battle of Lincoln. French lost foothold on England For 150 years the English Channel was an internal waterway for the 'homo sapiens' who had land, houses etcetera in both countries we now call "France" and "United Kingdom". Back then it was one country for William the Conqueror and his successors: the Angevin Empire. I read Richard Brooks' book 'The Knight Who Saved England. William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217' (2014). A lovely book. It was full of a lot of tiny but new detail about a period I only knew roughly. I read it because I wanted to have more background information on Knight William Marshal (1147-1219) before reading his biography History of William Marshal. This book was written in 1219 and its manuscript was lost for 600 years. In 1861 it was sold at Sothebys. In 2002-2006 the Anglo-Norman 'History' was translated in English by S. Gregory. Direct access to the world and words of a knight from the 13th century. WOW! I am very curious about their worldview. As a younger son - he had a couple of older brothers - William spent 22 years as a household knight before he stepped into the upper reaches of the nobility by marrying Isabel of Clare, countess of Pembroke and Striguil. In his 18-year tournament career he had taken over 500 knights. It made him rich. Knights were a "multi-purpose cavalry: complete warriors, inured to wounds and hardship, as useful for reconnaissance and dismounted action as for the charge. Fortified by their armoured protection and class solidarity, knights constituted the most potent military force of their day." Battles or sieges were only a minor part of a knight's career. Raiding was the daily reality of war. Raiding to destroy or gain the feudal property of their enemies. Why? To undermine their authority. In 1066 William the Conqueror from Normandy conquered England. He and his successors had land on both sides of the English Channel. In 1204 the English lost Normandy. (In 1453 at the Battle of Castillon they also lost the rest of France, with the exception of a few tiny spots ;) .) In 1217 the French lost foothold on England. William Marshal was personally involved in most of its battles back then. He personally saved England from the French at the battle of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217 and preserved the Magna Carta. The King became limited in his exercise of power: "No free man might be imprisoned, dispossessed, outlawed, banished, or otherwise ruined without lawful judgement." William is buried in Temple Church (London). When he died he was loved by friend and foe alike. Langton (1150-1228) called him the "Best knight that ever lived". Joining wisdom, prowess and loyalty. Original review - with pictures - posted on: http://jeand99.blogspot.nl/2014/05/or...

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Shelton

    The book suffers from two primary flaws. The first is that Mr. Brooks cannot seem to make up his mind whether he is telling a story or expounding historiography. Just at the moment when the reader is getting caught into the flow of events, he is asked to step outside and umpire a match between the three chroniclers upon whom Mr. Brooks places primary reliance. Few things are more annoying than being interrupted in the middle of a battle to be told that there is a dispute about which gate a charg The book suffers from two primary flaws. The first is that Mr. Brooks cannot seem to make up his mind whether he is telling a story or expounding historiography. Just at the moment when the reader is getting caught into the flow of events, he is asked to step outside and umpire a match between the three chroniclers upon whom Mr. Brooks places primary reliance. Few things are more annoying than being interrupted in the middle of a battle to be told that there is a dispute about which gate a charge came through, with one source insisting it was the West Gate, another positive for a postern, and a third absolutely certain that there was no gate at all, but that the attackers burrowed through a wall. One resists the urge to tell the author that deciding which source is correct is none of the reader's affair, and doesn't he know what footnotes are for? The second fault is that Mr. Brooks appears to read his facts in multiple ways. One moment King John is in desperate straits because he has lost London, next to which all the rest of the royal castles are nothing worth. And yet the next moment the King is quite secure because he retains all of those castles in the countryside. While this probably reflects accurately the mood swings of King John and his supporters, the average biographical reader has signed up to be told about mood swings, not to feel them. All the same, and in spite of the flaws, I found myself completely won over by the earnestness of Mr. Brooks, and the evident pains he has taken to be entirely fair to both subject and material. There has been comparatively little historical work done on the Marshal, except as an adjunct to whichever Plantagenet he happened to be saving at the moment. As a jumping-off place for future work, this book will serve excellently. It contains a soundly thought-out examination of the sources, and a wealth of background information, culled, no doubt, from the author's other work in military history. The book is a work-horse rather than a show horse, and a work-horse was what was needed here. It has earned its four stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Therese

    $1.99 As I've been reading about the monarchy of Great Britain (beginning with William the Conqueror in 1066), I've been learning a great deal, not only about the Kings and Queens who ruled, but other players who had a major impact on history. One of the most fascinating, and probably unheard of unless you've studied medieval history, is William Marshal. He served four Kings (Henry II, Richard, John, & Henry III), Henry The Young King, and his mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine. In a day and age when m $1.99 As I've been reading about the monarchy of Great Britain (beginning with William the Conqueror in 1066), I've been learning a great deal, not only about the Kings and Queens who ruled, but other players who had a major impact on history. One of the most fascinating, and probably unheard of unless you've studied medieval history, is William Marshal. He served four Kings (Henry II, Richard, John, & Henry III), Henry The Young King, and his mother, Eleanor of Aquitaine. In a day and age when men can be shot down in war, as well as everyday living, William lived to be 72 and active until nearly the end of his life. As the youngest son, he had very few prospects, but when opportunity knocked he was ready. I think what I admire most about this great knight is his loyalty and integrity, something that seemed to below with the wind during his time. Still this book is why I read historical fiction. It was very dry and I'm thankful to Elizabeth Chadwick for her books on William Marshal, in addition to Sharon Kay Penman for her books on the Plantagenets, the time of which William Marshall lived. Half of the book was about the battle of Lincoln, and I just don't do well with battles and wars. I appreciate well written historical fiction that brings people to life. This didn't do it to me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becca Edney

    A lot of interesting stuff, especially since it was about a historical figure and period I knew very little about. I particularly enjoyed the studies of contemporary chivalry and the tournament circuit, as well as the chapter on medieval military organisation generally. However, it wasn't very well organised, with a confusing habit of summarising an event or series of events and then, without any noticeable transition, going back to give details. This meant that on several occasions I didn't real A lot of interesting stuff, especially since it was about a historical figure and period I knew very little about. I particularly enjoyed the studies of contemporary chivalry and the tournament circuit, as well as the chapter on medieval military organisation generally. However, it wasn't very well organised, with a confusing habit of summarising an event or series of events and then, without any noticeable transition, going back to give details. This meant that on several occasions I didn't realise until I was several pages in that the summary and the details were referring to the same event. This often made the narrative as a whole difficult to follow. Finally, as a pet peeve, the author has a habit of converting contemporary money to modern money without taking any account of inflation, leading to the assertion at one point that a warhorse cost the equivalent of £10, when I imagine £10,000 would be more accurate in terms of purchasing power!

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Eppenstein

    William Marshall's name has popped up several times in my reading of British history. He always seemed to play some sort of background or supportive role to the primary historical actors. This book clarifies Marshall's role and his life story and is a solid biography. In addition the book offers a rather detailed accounting of knighthood, medieval battle tactics, and life. The only serious fault I found was in its attempt to clearly describe battle strategy and tactics without maps. Verbal descr William Marshall's name has popped up several times in my reading of British history. He always seemed to play some sort of background or supportive role to the primary historical actors. This book clarifies Marshall's role and his life story and is a solid biography. In addition the book offers a rather detailed accounting of knighthood, medieval battle tactics, and life. The only serious fault I found was in its attempt to clearly describe battle strategy and tactics without maps. Verbal descriptions of such activities is pointless unless the reader is familiar with the scene. Of course this is a book to be enjoyed by readers interested in this subject or period of history.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Geoffrey Bunting

    Dry as a bone. While it's styled "The Knight Who Saved England", the writer often posits how he didn't actually save England. The subline reads "William Marshal and the French Invasion" and while those things do appears, in reality they only take up a hundred of the three hundred pages of the book, the rest being contextual filler at best. Barely delivers on its title and blurb and oppressively boring, it is only just saved by the fact that, getting past the two hundred surplus pages, William Ma Dry as a bone. While it's styled "The Knight Who Saved England", the writer often posits how he didn't actually save England. The subline reads "William Marshal and the French Invasion" and while those things do appears, in reality they only take up a hundred of the three hundred pages of the book, the rest being contextual filler at best. Barely delivers on its title and blurb and oppressively boring, it is only just saved by the fact that, getting past the two hundred surplus pages, William Marshal is actually quite interesting. Fundamentally not very good, which is as much as you could expect from an Osprey publication.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Midgetbee

    William Marshall was born a younger son with little prospects. Through skill and loyalty he managed to rise from a humble squire to Regent of England for the underage Henry III. Not a personal history as such but more an account of the battles William took part in and the type of warfare he would engaged in. It's well written and packed with information. Worth a look for anyone interested in the time but it'd be worth getting a good general idea of the historical events beforehand. William Marshall was born a younger son with little prospects. Through skill and loyalty he managed to rise from a humble squire to Regent of England for the underage Henry III. Not a personal history as such but more an account of the battles William took part in and the type of warfare he would engaged in. It's well written and packed with information. Worth a look for anyone interested in the time but it'd be worth getting a good general idea of the historical events beforehand.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    The Knight Who Saved England is a biography of William Marshal. I thought it was well researched and really interesting to read about some of my ancestors. But towards the end it seemed to drag on and I started to get bored with the book at times. A good read from a historical viewpoint. 3 1/2 stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

    Given To Me For An Honest Review Richard Brooks book, The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217 was interesting. It is the biography of William Marshall who went from a soldier to a statesman. It wasn't what I thought it would be but if you enjoy reading about history you will enjoy reading it very much. Given To Me For An Honest Review Richard Brooks book, The Knight Who Saved England: William Marshal and the French Invasion, 1217 was interesting. It is the biography of William Marshall who went from a soldier to a statesman. It wasn't what I thought it would be but if you enjoy reading about history you will enjoy reading it very much.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yu-Jie

    "William rallied a country on the brink of defeat at an age when most men of his day had difficulty walking, let alone leading a cavalry charge." Quite an accessible account of a man truly deserving of the epitaph 'the greatest knight'. "William rallied a country on the brink of defeat at an age when most men of his day had difficulty walking, let alone leading a cavalry charge." Quite an accessible account of a man truly deserving of the epitaph 'the greatest knight'.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    In the end a bit of a slog. Some interesting stuff which the author 'hangs' on the biography of William Marshal. I was very entertained by the explanation of the Magna Carta - certainly not the document some of our politicians go on about with reverend voices..... In the end a bit of a slog. Some interesting stuff which the author 'hangs' on the biography of William Marshal. I was very entertained by the explanation of the Magna Carta - certainly not the document some of our politicians go on about with reverend voices.....

  27. 4 out of 5

    regina c c c gomes

    Interesting Interesting historical document about the most important Earl in England in the beginning of the plantageneta age. Lincoln battle and Sandwich battle are well described.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    It's ok. Bit dry ! It's ok. Bit dry !

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Excellent, everyone should know more about this man

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A slog, meant for only the biggest fans of the Second Battle of Lincoln.

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