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Up Up Down Down Left WRITE: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism

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Have you ever dreamed about getting paid to write about video games and the fascinating people who make them? Unless you live on the West Coast and are lucky enough to land a rare staff position at one of the major gaming publications, freelancing is the best way to turn slinging words about your favorite hobby into a viable and lucrative career. The best part? You can do Have you ever dreamed about getting paid to write about video games and the fascinating people who make them? Unless you live on the West Coast and are lucky enough to land a rare staff position at one of the major gaming publications, freelancing is the best way to turn slinging words about your favorite hobby into a viable and lucrative career. The best part? You can do it from anywhere! Up Up Down Down Left WRITE: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism covers everything you need to get started along the path to launching and maintaining a successful freelance career in the gaming industry. Pro freelancer Nathan Meunier has written for more than 30 of the top gaming outlets - from Nintendo Power, GamePro, and Official Xbox Magazine to IGN, GameSpot, Electronic Gaming Monthly, and more. In this advice-packed tome for aspiring freelance game journos and more established writers alike, Nathan delivers detailed insights and how-to tips based on many years of professional writing experience. Learn How To -Generate killer article ideas, pitch editors, and score paying work -Build towards quitting your day job to freelance full-time -Juggle the business-related side of freelancing -Cover gaming conventions and press junkets -Network with editors and writers -Work with PR to gain coverage opportunities and free review games


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Have you ever dreamed about getting paid to write about video games and the fascinating people who make them? Unless you live on the West Coast and are lucky enough to land a rare staff position at one of the major gaming publications, freelancing is the best way to turn slinging words about your favorite hobby into a viable and lucrative career. The best part? You can do Have you ever dreamed about getting paid to write about video games and the fascinating people who make them? Unless you live on the West Coast and are lucky enough to land a rare staff position at one of the major gaming publications, freelancing is the best way to turn slinging words about your favorite hobby into a viable and lucrative career. The best part? You can do it from anywhere! Up Up Down Down Left WRITE: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism covers everything you need to get started along the path to launching and maintaining a successful freelance career in the gaming industry. Pro freelancer Nathan Meunier has written for more than 30 of the top gaming outlets - from Nintendo Power, GamePro, and Official Xbox Magazine to IGN, GameSpot, Electronic Gaming Monthly, and more. In this advice-packed tome for aspiring freelance game journos and more established writers alike, Nathan delivers detailed insights and how-to tips based on many years of professional writing experience. Learn How To -Generate killer article ideas, pitch editors, and score paying work -Build towards quitting your day job to freelance full-time -Juggle the business-related side of freelancing -Cover gaming conventions and press junkets -Network with editors and writers -Work with PR to gain coverage opportunities and free review games

30 review for Up Up Down Down Left WRITE: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ishmael Brown

    The concept of the working life and joys of a man in today’s society is the topic Nathan introduces in this guide. Up Up Down Down Left Write: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism is essentially a guide trying to help the reader live the life of freelancing appropriately based on Nathan Meunier’s own experiences. I’ve read the “Praise for Up Up Down Down Left Write” section of the book, as well as the “Foreword” section of the book, both times in vain. I, at the time, felt as though the The concept of the working life and joys of a man in today’s society is the topic Nathan introduces in this guide. Up Up Down Down Left Write: The Freelance Guide to Video Game Journalism is essentially a guide trying to help the reader live the life of freelancing appropriately based on Nathan Meunier’s own experiences. I’ve read the “Praise for Up Up Down Down Left Write” section of the book, as well as the “Foreword” section of the book, both times in vain. I, at the time, felt as though the compliments to the book were all written vaguely but in a read through, I’m starting to realize that there isn’t too many more ways to word their thoughts. Now I just wish I had been associated in the publishing of the book to submit my own statements of praise because Nathan Meunier, the author of Up Up Down Down Left Write, certainly did a great job writing this book. It may be the pure nature of this book that makes my opinion appear somewhat biased but I can assure you otherwise. Although I would strongly consider freelancing as one of my top career choices it wouldn’t be just any freelance guide to trust, I had previously seen much of Nathan’s work, so I knew that whenever his words were to touch paper, it had the possibility of spawning something great. Now to find a book of him, well and alive, taking you through how we does what he does best, compared to his competitor’s guides, the choice is obvious. There is some to admit, however. Although his style of writing was very easy to read, a lot more formal than what you would expect, and through this it became a bit too formal. He used quite a bit of slang and on top of that came a lot of referencing and clichés, and there’s even a couple of typos I found, so early on I commonly found myself struggling to understand exactly what he was talking about. It is also worth mentioning here that his language is of a “Pg-13” standard. With more reading though it does become much easier to get the jive of what he’s saying. There is, however a lot more good than there is weakness, so still justly outweighing the bad, so much so that it becomes rather irrelevant to point them out, but for the sake of the review I felt it was necessary. Aside from the typos at least, I would still have to say that I wouldn’t change anything in the book, because if anything, whatever is changed will take away from the text. For those who may not know, Nathan Meunier is a freelance game journalist, in short, someone who writes on the latest of and greatest, a news reporter, or paper editor essentially, but in the gaming world. Game freelancing, is a tricky business and can be very hard to manage, but nevertheless it can be both enjoyable and profitable, and it is this type of conflicting arguments that drive the book. In the entirety of the book this war is alive, the pain and struggles of freelance against the luxuries of freelancing, though being one of the more underlying concepts, it is still one of the most important ones. The book has an informal structure, one that I did not expect to find to find, but sensible due to his way of guiding, everything is divided into 4 parts and many chapters and then even more by subtitles. It almost becomes a directory for freelancing, or a dictionary of tips. And so a full read through just isn’t necessary(unless you’re studying freelancing probably.) It is almost as if he is giving lessons by reflecting on his own actions, though he does not clearly justify this in the text. Of all the topics, strategies and tips covered in the book, ranging anywhere from just “Getting Started” to as intense as “Moving Hell”, some I’m even using now, I’d have to award the topic that I relate to the most is to being mentally stuck in my writing. As a writer, the lack of “new” environment does a toll on me and I now see that many writers can also face this issue and without the proper care can cause serious issues. Though it may not seem as serious to many, I guarantee that the reader will find an abundance of similarly important issues that they face just as a writer, before the gaming even starts. For the remainder of the book things were a little less relatable, considering that I am actually not a game freelancer yet, or any journalist for that matter, his idealism and concept of the lifestyle will be foreign to most. So in my opinion, this book was a fantastic read and guide. Although it has it faults, the book was still great. The overall lessons are apparent, they are there, and most importantly they are effective. For all of us, I think the goal was met for both the writer and the reader, he aspired to turn the questions he received as an experienced journalist and work them into one huge guide of a book to teach beginners and those who may be interested about a “different” lifestyle as well as how to live it. On my end, I can say I am glad to have read this book and am inspired to begin my way into the freelance world of gaming and I recommend anyone that likes to play games, and likes to write, to come and read this book to be on your way too. I just can’t help but wonder now, how could the second most common freelance game guide, Critical Path, by Dan Armich, compare to this book. I may see what I can learn from the next one later.Nathan Meunier

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    I was better off consulting another freelancer guide. This one didn’t have nearly enough information for complete noobs, regardless of what they wanted to write about. It’s a summarization of what one needs to get started, but not the nitty gritty details.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Agustin Guerrero

    A lot of good insight into the book about the actual day to day job of a freelance writer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cara

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  6. 5 out of 5

    Colin Stevens

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dale Lipscomb

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Derek Pietras

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marce

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Tyzak

  16. 5 out of 5

    Clara Pavía

  17. 4 out of 5

    Venisia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kaculkin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Bojanksi

  20. 4 out of 5

    Moises

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Harris

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barry Rice

  25. 5 out of 5

    Oleg

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Schley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Osz

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vitor Santos

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luke

  30. 4 out of 5

    Irhad Suljic

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