counter create hit The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder

Availability: Ready to download

After his December 2003 arrest, registered nurse Charlie Cullen was quickly dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media. But Cullen was no mercy killer, nor was he a simple monster. He was a favorite son, husband, beloved father, best friend, and celebrated caregiver. Implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients, he was also perhaps the most prolific serial killer in A After his December 2003 arrest, registered nurse Charlie Cullen was quickly dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media. But Cullen was no mercy killer, nor was he a simple monster. He was a favorite son, husband, beloved father, best friend, and celebrated caregiver. Implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients, he was also perhaps the most prolific serial killer in American history. Cullen's murderous career in the world's most trusted profession spanned sixteen years and nine hospitals across New Jersey and Pennsylvania. When, in March of 2006, Charles Cullen was marched from his final sentencing in an Allentown, Pennsylvania, courthouse into a waiting police van, it seemed certain that the chilling secrets of his life, career, and capture would disappear with him. Now, in a riveting piece of investigative journalism nearly ten years in the making, journalist Charles Graeber presents the whole story for the first time. Based on hundreds of pages of previously unseen police records, interviews, wire-tap recordings and videotapes, as well as exclusive jailhouse conversations with Cullen himself and the confidential informant who helped bring him down, THE GOOD NURSE weaves an urgent, terrifying tale of murder, friendship, and betrayal. Graeber's portrait of Cullen depicts a surprisingly intelligent and complicated young man whose promising career was overwhelmed by his compulsion to kill, and whose shy demeanor masked a twisted interior life hidden even to his family and friends. Were it not for the hardboiled, unrelenting work of two former Newark homicide detectives racing to put together the pieces of Cullen's professional past, and a fellow nurse willing to put everything at risk, including her job and the safety of her children, there's no telling how many more lives could have been lost. In the tradition of In Cold Blood, THE GOOD NURSE does more than chronicle Cullen's deadly career and the breathless efforts to stop him; it paints an incredibly vivid portrait of madness and offers a penetrating look inside America's medical system. Harrowing and irresistibly paced, this book will make you look at medicine, hospitals, and the people who work in them, in an entirely different way.


Compare
Ads Banner

After his December 2003 arrest, registered nurse Charlie Cullen was quickly dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media. But Cullen was no mercy killer, nor was he a simple monster. He was a favorite son, husband, beloved father, best friend, and celebrated caregiver. Implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients, he was also perhaps the most prolific serial killer in A After his December 2003 arrest, registered nurse Charlie Cullen was quickly dubbed "The Angel of Death" by the media. But Cullen was no mercy killer, nor was he a simple monster. He was a favorite son, husband, beloved father, best friend, and celebrated caregiver. Implicated in the deaths of as many as 300 patients, he was also perhaps the most prolific serial killer in American history. Cullen's murderous career in the world's most trusted profession spanned sixteen years and nine hospitals across New Jersey and Pennsylvania. When, in March of 2006, Charles Cullen was marched from his final sentencing in an Allentown, Pennsylvania, courthouse into a waiting police van, it seemed certain that the chilling secrets of his life, career, and capture would disappear with him. Now, in a riveting piece of investigative journalism nearly ten years in the making, journalist Charles Graeber presents the whole story for the first time. Based on hundreds of pages of previously unseen police records, interviews, wire-tap recordings and videotapes, as well as exclusive jailhouse conversations with Cullen himself and the confidential informant who helped bring him down, THE GOOD NURSE weaves an urgent, terrifying tale of murder, friendship, and betrayal. Graeber's portrait of Cullen depicts a surprisingly intelligent and complicated young man whose promising career was overwhelmed by his compulsion to kill, and whose shy demeanor masked a twisted interior life hidden even to his family and friends. Were it not for the hardboiled, unrelenting work of two former Newark homicide detectives racing to put together the pieces of Cullen's professional past, and a fellow nurse willing to put everything at risk, including her job and the safety of her children, there's no telling how many more lives could have been lost. In the tradition of In Cold Blood, THE GOOD NURSE does more than chronicle Cullen's deadly career and the breathless efforts to stop him; it paints an incredibly vivid portrait of madness and offers a penetrating look inside America's medical system. Harrowing and irresistibly paced, this book will make you look at medicine, hospitals, and the people who work in them, in an entirely different way.

30 review for The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen King

    You think Annie Wilkes was bad? Check out this chilling nonfiction account of Charlie Cullen, a friendly nurse who may have killed several -hundred patients before he was caught. Now, there’s a real cockadoodie brat.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    4 to 4.5 stars A very interesting and shocking story. It is amazing to think that monsters like this could be amongst those who are supposed to take care of and heal us. This book hit home with me a bit more than it might some as I work in health care and deal with the Pyxis system from time to time - which is referenced frequently throughout the book. While it did get a little slow (just a teeny, tiny bit) toward the end, it was still an enthralling investigation into madness. If you think you can 4 to 4.5 stars A very interesting and shocking story. It is amazing to think that monsters like this could be amongst those who are supposed to take care of and heal us. This book hit home with me a bit more than it might some as I work in health care and deal with the Pyxis system from time to time - which is referenced frequently throughout the book. While it did get a little slow (just a teeny, tiny bit) toward the end, it was still an enthralling investigation into madness. If you think you can play the Angel of Death with human lives in a hospital, you are gonna have a bad time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X

    It was money, greed, profits that allowed the nurse to get away with serial killing. The American health care system is first and foremost a business like any other, it exists to make money. Its product is health care. Savings can be made by cutting costs. Less nurses, automated drug retrieval and disposal systems. Untruthful, but vague references to cut the odds of the hospital involving another high-profit business, litigation, when someone is 'let go'. Agencies hire and send out staff without It was money, greed, profits that allowed the nurse to get away with serial killing. The American health care system is first and foremost a business like any other, it exists to make money. Its product is health care. Savings can be made by cutting costs. Less nurses, automated drug retrieval and disposal systems. Untruthful, but vague references to cut the odds of the hospital involving another high-profit business, litigation, when someone is 'let go'. Agencies hire and send out staff without checking on these vague references as they make money on the hours the nurses work or the contracts they get them, due diligence would cost them money. Then there is the great cover up. All the medical staff stick together and deny anything that would get any of them into trouble, not only stick together but get rid of evidence that might incriminate them should anyone manage to get through this monolithic wall of non-disclosure and investigate them. Not many ordinary people, families to patients who died an unexpected and untimely death have either the willpower to persist for years in trying to find out what happened or the wherewithal to employ lawyers to do so. They will get no help from insurance companies or health authorities, neither of whom care about truth, only profits. It all comes down to money. Does this mean it couldn't happen in a country with socialised medicine? Sadly, no. It's the same fear of litigation and medical staff sticking together, even though the profit motif is missing. How do we prevent these mass murderers who move among sick people like they are angels of mercy when they are really angels of death? How do we even know how many there are when everything that might reflect badly on a medical institution or staff is covered up? Good question. I can't think of an answer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    An informative, but very disturbing look at the inadequacy of the healthcare industry of today. Pretty scary stuff knowing that we will probably all end up there for one reason or another (if we live long enough.) Having had someone close to me spend quite a bit of time there, I have seen the good and the bad in the nursing profession, but I think what upsets me most in this true-crime novel is the "transfer the problem" scenario that killed the 300+ innocent people. Shame on those corporations An informative, but very disturbing look at the inadequacy of the healthcare industry of today. Pretty scary stuff knowing that we will probably all end up there for one reason or another (if we live long enough.) Having had someone close to me spend quite a bit of time there, I have seen the good and the bad in the nursing profession, but I think what upsets me most in this true-crime novel is the "transfer the problem" scenario that killed the 300+ innocent people. Shame on those corporations in PA and NJ who did not even contact the authorities suspecting and/or even knowing they had a killer in their employ all because of their reputations and bottom line. My biggest fear is that with the direction our current government is headed with healthcare, it will probably only get worse. A truly frightening read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jaidee

    2 stars ! I have the deepest sadness for the 400 victims and their families that were killed by this most evil nurse who killed as easily as picking berries from a bush. I am extremely angry that hospital bureaucrats did nothing at several hospitals and in fact enabled this man to kill nonstop for many years. The 2 stars is for the quality of the book that made a valiant attempt for a clear trajectory of this nightmare but it failed on many counts: 1. the narrative read more like a low budget crime 2 stars ! I have the deepest sadness for the 400 victims and their families that were killed by this most evil nurse who killed as easily as picking berries from a bush. I am extremely angry that hospital bureaucrats did nothing at several hospitals and in fact enabled this man to kill nonstop for many years. The 2 stars is for the quality of the book that made a valiant attempt for a clear trajectory of this nightmare but it failed on many counts: 1. the narrative read more like a low budget crime show than a serious work of investigative journalism 2. there was absolutely no analysis of what happened except for very simplistic explanations that was as tepid as weak cold tea 3. no interviews were conducted with outside experts like forensic psychologists to explain the murderer's psychopathology or organizational sociologists to explain how so many things could go wrong at the institutional level etc. I do thank the author however for attempting to tell this story that is tragic and unfathomable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnne

    The Good Nurse The Most Disturbing True Crime Book in Decades Killer Nurse: Charles Cullin is sworn in during a court proceeding This is not a script for a horror movie. This is a true story, and it could happen to you or someone you love. Charlie Cullen was a serial-killer nurse who slowly murdered an estimated 400 patients in 9 hospitals over a span of 16 years, making him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history. Cullen would spike hundreds of hospital i.v. bags with insulin or digoxin, The Good Nurse The Most Disturbing True Crime Book in Decades Killer Nurse: Charles Cullin is sworn in during a court proceeding This is not a script for a horror movie. This is a true story, and it could happen to you or someone you love. Charlie Cullen was a serial-killer nurse who slowly murdered an estimated 400 patients in 9 hospitals over a span of 16 years, making him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history. Cullen would spike hundreds of hospital i.v. bags with insulin or digoxin, causing patients to overdose on unprescribed drugs. The patient's conditions would mysteriously deteriorate and then they would die. A national shortage of nurses makes it difficult for hospitals to recruit quality nurses. Charlie Cullen continued to find good work as a nurse despite a long, documented history of mental instability including: * hundreds of suspicious deaths of his patients during his shifts * a medical discharge from the Navy after trying to commit suicide * 8 more suicide attempts * 3 unsuccessful stints in psychiatric facilities for mental instability * 1 arrest & probation for stalking, breaking & entering & trespassing * 2 formal domestic violence accusations to police by his ex-wife * a long history of torturing & killing small helpless pets * neighbors reporting him yelling and talking to himself How did Charlie Cullen continue to get away with killing patients for so many years? According to investigating detectives, co-workers and even Cullen himself, several hospitals suspected he was harming and killing patients but they refused to take appropriate legal actions. Why did hospitals refuse to take appropriate legal actions? Corporate staff at greedy, profit driven hospitals knowingly covered up Cullen's crimes because they prioritized their profits and their reputations over the lives and well-being of their patients. Seven of Cullen's co-workers at St. Luke's Hospital met with the Lehigh County district attorney to alert authorities of their suspicions that Cullen had used drugs to kill patients. They pointed out that in 6 months, Cullen had only worked 20% of the hours on his unit but was present for 2/3's of the deaths. Investigators never looked into Cullen's past, and his case was dropped 9 months later due to lack of evidence. It was later learned that hospital administrators had stymied the investigation by not being totally forthcoming with investigators. Corporate staff at hospitals refused to alert police, refused to alert state regulators and refused to take any steps to protect other patients as potential victims. They simply pressured this serial killer employee to quietly transfer to another, unsuspecting hospital where he could continue murdering patients, but at a different hospital. The most guilty of these corporate criminals is Mary Lund, a corrupt bureaucrat at Somerset Medical Center. Mary Lund repeatedly lied to police and blatantly obstructed justice to protect Somerset Medical Center's reputation and lucrative profits. Mary Lund made it her mission to prioritize her hospital's profits over the lives of hundreds of people. Mary Lund was never prosecuted for her cover-up of Charles Cullen's murders at her medical center. Mary Lund should be serving time in prison, yet she happily lives her life, successful in her career where I believe she has been promoted. Google her name to see for yourself. Thanks to a very upstanding diligent nurse named Nancy Doherty, at Somerset Medical Center, Charles Cullen's suspicious activities were finally reported to the New Jersey Poison Control. Later, two police detectives, Detective Braun and Detective Baldwin worked tirelessly to gather enough evidence from Somerset Med Center to arrest Cullen for his crimes. Still, corrupt hospital administrators like Mary Lund at Somerset, blatantly lied to the detectives in an effort trip up their investigation, making it nearly impossible for them to pin down Charles Cullen's criminal activity. I really hope, in my heart, that this book will help the victim's of Charles Cullen & the victim's of corporate criminals like Mary Lund, finally receive some sort of valid justice and compensation. This is a shameful and terrifying portrait of American corporate greed and corrupt morals. Last, below is a list of hospitals and the timeline of Charles Cullen's employment where & when he committed his hundreds of murders. 1. 1988-1992 Saint Barnabas Medical Center; Livingston, NJ 2. 1992-1993 Warren Hospital; Phillipsburg, NJ 3. 1994-1996 Hunterdon Medical Center; Flemington, NJ 4. 1996-1997 Morristown Memorial Hospital; Morristown, NJ 5. 1998-1998 Liberty Nursing & Rehab Center; Allentown, PA 6. 1998-1999 Easton Hospital; Easton, PA 7. 1999-1999 Lehigh Valley Hospital; Allentown, PA 8. 1999-2002 St. Luke's Hospital; Bethlehem, PA 9. 2002-2003 Somerset Medical Center; Somerville, NJ Charlie Cullen was finally arrested in 2003, after sixteen years and 400 dead patients under his care.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    How could you resist wanting to read a book about a good nurse gone bad? Since I work in the OR myself, I just was so curious about this book because it just seems so unbelievable. I mean, how could someone who is trained to care for patients and be there for their every need want to kill them? I wanted to see what could possess someone to do such a thing. The first quarter of the book was interesting. It gave some insight to the nurse's background and habits. I was mesmerized by the fact that he How could you resist wanting to read a book about a good nurse gone bad? Since I work in the OR myself, I just was so curious about this book because it just seems so unbelievable. I mean, how could someone who is trained to care for patients and be there for their every need want to kill them? I wanted to see what could possess someone to do such a thing. The first quarter of the book was interesting. It gave some insight to the nurse's background and habits. I was mesmerized by the fact that he was such a hard worker and worked the hours that no one wanted to work, but would suddenly turn when he found something else outside of work to possess. I was astounded by the fact that he could go from hospital to hospital after all of the suspicions that followed him and yet had no problems getting jobs and in area where people were dying. It was sickening really. The rest of the book just sort of dragged on for me. I don't know if it was just depressing or just to wordy, but I got bored at that point. I would still recommend this book because it is insightful and scary and it's good to know that you have to be guarded when you or someone you love is in the care of others. At least that is my opinion.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alisi ☆ wants to read too many books ☆

    My rating: 2.5 stars. I truly wanted to like this more. This whole subject of "Angels Of Death" really fascinate me in terms of serial killer behavior, and I was fully wanting to round the stars up to 3 because it's obviously his first book. I truly couldn't after I read the afterword. This novel suffers from this distinct issues. The first is the easiest, the other two are tied into each other. Issue 1: The dialog sucks. This writer couldn't do decent dialog to save his life. The sheer amount of ' My rating: 2.5 stars. I truly wanted to like this more. This whole subject of "Angels Of Death" really fascinate me in terms of serial killer behavior, and I was fully wanting to round the stars up to 3 because it's obviously his first book. I truly couldn't after I read the afterword. This novel suffers from this distinct issues. The first is the easiest, the other two are tied into each other. Issue 1: The dialog sucks. This writer couldn't do decent dialog to save his life. The sheer amount of 'Uh's and 'Um's and 'Okay's and 'Er's made me want to throw my ipod. Seriously. There are whole conversations on the phone where one person is just saying "Um. Er. Ah. Okay." the entire time to everything that is being spoken about. Issue 2: The author wrote this in a kind of imitation of Capote's 'In Cold Blood' and that failed. Hard. There is no problem trying to emulate greatness, just as long as you're being realistic about it. One of the great things about Capote's book is how he makes you feel for the bad guys. Graeber tries that and failed very badly, which ties into... Issue 3: The first half of this book is almost unbearable. The author writes almost entirely from the killers POV and the author didn't write it as a more distant nonfiction book. He tries to make this into more of a work of fiction (which is why there is an Issue 1.) This translates into taking the killers side of everything. The first half of the book is just filled with this guys depression. Oh, he's so stressed and then he kills someone. It's so odd. All the biographical stuff is almost entirely overlooked. The author prattles on about how the killer is leaving brownies for one of his coworkers and he goes on and on and on about how this makes the killer feel, and then he goes on and on and on about how the killer feels when the woman ignores him after he tells her who it is but the actual meat of the event -- the semi-stalking and, in one case, breaking into a house -- is given more as an afterthought. I don't care about the depression of this killer (who's thought to have killed over 400 people.) I want the facts. The killer was able to charm the author so much so that the first half of the book (which is, as I said, from the killers POV) is just the sob story that most sociopath serial killers give. It's only until you get to the second part that we can finally cut the chains tying us to the pity train. The afterword is the worst, though. It's amazing how this author can go on and on and on about the killers depression (yes, after it's estimated that he's killed over 400 people, the author is still trying to feed us the 'feel sorry for me' line.) It was an added insult to injury for the author to put that the killer was yelling through the witness testimonies and then, not two sentences later, go on about said depression because the poor, poor, poor killer isn't able to donate a kidney. Why, he's always been a hardworking healthcare worker who provided the best he work he could and that meany judge won't let him donate a kidney? Why, how cruel the legal system is to keep down such a fine, upstanding nurse. Gag me with a fucking spoon. I lost whatever respect I had for the author right then. The final verdict is this: this SERIAL KILLER is a sociopath and the author obviously fell of it hook, line, and sinker. If you're looking for a more balanced true crime novel of a serial killer (something similar to Anne Rule's take on Bundy), you won't find it here. The author needs to grow up a little and actually research what these sorts of killers are like. This is an insult to the people he killed and the families that suffered.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    My sincere thanks to all the very dedicated Nurses and other medical staff that I know and love for their dedication to their careers and their patients. I have faith that there are few people like Charlie Cullen. The Good Nurse depicts Charlie Cullen as an angel of death. In the truest sense this may be the term that is used to describe someone who murders his/her patients. Though angels are not always good, I've always seen them as such. My picture of An Angel of Death is a person, perhaps mis My sincere thanks to all the very dedicated Nurses and other medical staff that I know and love for their dedication to their careers and their patients. I have faith that there are few people like Charlie Cullen. The Good Nurse depicts Charlie Cullen as an angel of death. In the truest sense this may be the term that is used to describe someone who murders his/her patients. Though angels are not always good, I've always seen them as such. My picture of An Angel of Death is a person, perhaps misguided, who gives a very ill person an assist out of this world and puts an end to their suffering. I do not consider this their right but can understand the concept. A mercy killing. I've never read any true crime story quite like this. Throughout, I continually shook my head. It was bad enough that Cullen killed many people, perhaps as many as 400. What I found incomprehensible and in the end, despicable was the turning of the heads, the ignoring of the facts, the good references, which allowed Cullen to continue nursing, going from one hospital to the next for over 13 years, this by hospital personnel and administration. To maintain ratings; to prevent suits, to get him out of their hospital. Thank heavens someone, "a confidential informant" finally helped police to stop Charlie Cullen. Charles Graeber did his best to provide a portrait of Charlie Cullen's actions and deeds. I'm not certain he was ever able to truly scratch the service of what makes Charlie tick. Writing - 3.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Niezgoda

    Dr. Death 2.0 ... but more chilling! 4 stars for this true crime catastrophe! Synopsis: The Good Nurse unfolds in two parts. The first being a chronicle of all of Charles Cullen’s comings and goings across nine hospitals in the Jersey/Pennsylvania states. The second highlights the investigation into Charlie Cullen as a murderous nurse who killed over 30 patients. 30+ PATIENTS. WTF?! HOLY SHIT! Have you listened to Dr. Death by Wondery? It's a podcast surrounding the criminal case against Christoph Dr. Death 2.0 ... but more chilling! 4 stars for this true crime catastrophe! Synopsis: The Good Nurse unfolds in two parts. The first being a chronicle of all of Charles Cullen’s comings and goings across nine hospitals in the Jersey/Pennsylvania states. The second highlights the investigation into Charlie Cullen as a murderous nurse who killed over 30 patients. 30+ PATIENTS. WTF?! HOLY SHIT! Have you listened to Dr. Death by Wondery? It's a podcast surrounding the criminal case against Christopher Duntsch. I thought I’d heard the worst when I learned what Duntsch did. But then came Charlie Cullen! What’s insane about this case is his void of motive. He just killed because he could. And he waited to get caught! And when he didn't, he killed again 😳 And what’s PURE INSANITY is the multitude of hospitals that had suspicions that Charlie was doing shady shit but provided him with a neutral reference to work somewhere else so their reputation wouldn't be tainted!! HOW?! WHAT? SERIOUSLY?! ☠️This infuriated me. This institution is supposed to protect us. To revive us. Not pass off a murderer! As several reviews have stated, I too found the second half of this audiobook more intriguing, BUT you CAN'T skip the first half. It’s instrumental in building all the critical evidentiary pieces. Soooooo if you want a vantage point into the not-so-pleasant side of America’s medical system, THEN LISTEN/READ THIS! It's thanks to nurse Amy Loughren, and detectives Dan Baldwin and Tim Braun who broke this case. Their persistence, courage, and intuition led to this conviction. It's a seriously wild ride.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kasia

    Absolutely chilling account of a killing sprees performed by a registered nurse on her most venerable patients. It hits close to home, it really does. All the methods of manipulating medication dispensers on the units, injecting digoxin or insulin into IV bags, or pushing wrong medications directly into patients IVs are still commonly performed and widely accepted on many units, and no one thinks about it twice. Pharmacy sends and restocks medications constantly without second guessing orders. N Absolutely chilling account of a killing sprees performed by a registered nurse on her most venerable patients. It hits close to home, it really does. All the methods of manipulating medication dispensers on the units, injecting digoxin or insulin into IV bags, or pushing wrong medications directly into patients IVs are still commonly performed and widely accepted on many units, and no one thinks about it twice. Pharmacy sends and restocks medications constantly without second guessing orders. No accountability exist for missing doses or partial doses of narcotics or high risk medications(heparin insulin fentanyl morphine) In truth, the only factor that decides whether or not patient will live and improve is... the sanity of the nurse that takes care of him.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ALLEN

    From the mid-1980s to the end of 2003, an intensive-care nurse named Charles Cullen worked a string of hospitals in the northern New Jersey / eastern Pennsylvania region, killing deeply ill people by adding toxic medicines to their I.V. bags. Although Cullen escaped under a cloud from several employers, he was not charged with murder until Christmastime, 2003, though it was presupposed he must have dispatched at least forty ailing patients, probably more. Most frustrating of all, perusal of medi From the mid-1980s to the end of 2003, an intensive-care nurse named Charles Cullen worked a string of hospitals in the northern New Jersey / eastern Pennsylvania region, killing deeply ill people by adding toxic medicines to their I.V. bags. Although Cullen escaped under a cloud from several employers, he was not charged with murder until Christmastime, 2003, though it was presupposed he must have dispatched at least forty ailing patients, probably more. Most frustrating of all, perusal of medical records often told exactly HOW the many patients died (usually with purloined drugs from the computerized drug hopper, ordered under different patients' names), but not conclusively who did it, or exactly when. Charlie was very good at covering his tracks, and for most of his career was considered a good -- if not outstanding -- floor nurse by his co-workers and supervisors. Charles Graeber's enlightening and often engrossing 2013 NF book tells the story in "Law and Order" fashion: first, where Charlie worked and what he likely did, and second, what his friend-who-is-a-girl (Amy) did to abet the police once they started cracking down on him and needed evidence. As true-crime stories go, it's better than most. My chief objections are two: First, that the text is too rife with footnotes. Don't get me wrong, I'm a footnote guy when it comes to histories or biographies, but too many of them here merely clutter the text with side information not vital to the story. Second, sometimes there is too much side information within the text. Consider this passage on p. 213 of the mass-market paperback version: Tim and Danny [detectives] watched the guy [gravedigger] gopher out a few shovelfuls until the spade hit concrete, the hard, hollow sound reflexively triggering the thought of pirate-movie treasure. An hour later the digger had the vault exposed at the bottom of a neat, rectangular hole, the dimensions having been figured just right to allow the guy to work a chain around the vault sides. This goes on for another twelve lines, but it could all have been easily replaced with: "The body was exhumed and sent to the medical examiner's office." THE GOOD NURSE, despite its length (even the "Post Script" runs 25 pages), it still a riveting story, though it largely leaves unexplored the idea of how to guard against highly-credentialed psychopaths with so much access to legal -- and potentially lethal -- prescription drugs. After nearly six years, I still hope for a movie, assuming the script has been properly trimmed. I should also point out that the mass-market paperback I read has no photos, except a small one of Charlie Cullen on the cover. PHOTO: Charles Cullen, "Angel of Death":

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book is one of only two true crime books I read this year and it was a truly well-written, gripping, and shocking story. True crime stories can sometimes be boring reads, spending countless pages on dialogue that never really happened. I crossed my fingers as I opened the book, hoping that it would get off to an interesting start. I was more than impressed. As much as this story was about Charlie Cullen, nurse cum serial killer, it was just as much an indictment about the failure of the Amer This book is one of only two true crime books I read this year and it was a truly well-written, gripping, and shocking story. True crime stories can sometimes be boring reads, spending countless pages on dialogue that never really happened. I crossed my fingers as I opened the book, hoping that it would get off to an interesting start. I was more than impressed. As much as this story was about Charlie Cullen, nurse cum serial killer, it was just as much an indictment about the failure of the American hospital system. All of the hospitals Cullen worked at in his 16 year profession as a nurse responded to Cullen's various shortcomings by passing the buck to the next hospital. As his transgressions quickly added up in number and severity, no one thought to warn his next place of employment, state medical boards, or the police. This all culminated in his final investigation in his last place of employment, where investigators had been warned/threatened numerous times by the local board of health to contact authorities. The hospital did not want a lawsuits or sanctions on their hands, so they ignored commands until they were turned into the police. They then stonewalled police and withheld information that was critical to arresting Cullen. How the police end up actually obtaining critical documents was even more fascinating. I'd recommend this book to anyone interested in a captivating true crime book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I think the scariest part of the Exorcist was not the head spinning, stomach writing or projectile vomiting. It was the test and treatments in the hospital. Yes, hospitals can be the scariest place on earth and if you have a nurse like Charlie Cullen working there, run don't walk to the nearest exit. Charlie Cullen worked the hospitals of Pennsylvania and New Jersey from the late 1990's to 2003 leaving a mysterious trail of dead patients in his wake. Dead from overdoses of insulin and digoxin and I think the scariest part of the Exorcist was not the head spinning, stomach writing or projectile vomiting. It was the test and treatments in the hospital. Yes, hospitals can be the scariest place on earth and if you have a nurse like Charlie Cullen working there, run don't walk to the nearest exit. Charlie Cullen worked the hospitals of Pennsylvania and New Jersey from the late 1990's to 2003 leaving a mysterious trail of dead patients in his wake. Dead from overdoses of insulin and digoxin and epinephrine either injected into their IV bags or directly into the patient themselves. Many were not even his patients. When suspected of the deaths but lacking solid proof the hospitals would terminate his employment but give him a "neutral" job appraisal so Charlie would just go to the next hospital down the road and start killing all over again. The why is never very clear. It was just a compulsion. His patients in many cases were not dying. He just killed many at random. Because of the nursing shortage and his willingness to work nights, weekends and holidays Charlie had no problem getting a new job. He even attempted suicide on many occasions and once while in a mental facility he received a call from the hospital he was working at, not to be fired but to come back to work right away. That was how easy it was for him to get work. This is painful to read for the millions out there hunting for work who never hurt a fly. Cullen may go down in history as the largest mass murderer in the country with at least 40 deaths but he could be responsible for more than 400. He says he just can't recall all of them. But the hospital administrators who let him go without investigating, fearing lawsuits are as culpable since they facilitated his continuous murder spree. Chilling disturbing read that makes you angry at the entire health care system.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Myrna

    The author did a very good job on the research but I was expecting something different. Part I read like a book report: lots of facts and background information on Cullen. Part II delved into the investigation. I liked this part more. Amy's part in all of this was very interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kirstin

    Charles Cullen confessed to 40 murders but the estimated number is more like 400. What is more shocking is that the hospitals he worked for allowed this to happen out of fear for legal repercussions. He would be caught, then let go(with references). Unbelievable. 16 years this went on. Truth is more frightening than fiction.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Peter Monn

    Not what I expected. I was hoping it would be a little bit more resolved. My full review will be up on my booktube channel at http://YouTube.com/peterlikesbooks Not what I expected. I was hoping it would be a little bit more resolved. My full review will be up on my booktube channel at http://YouTube.com/peterlikesbooks

  18. 5 out of 5

    PF

    I haven't read a book this quickly in a long time. My first reaction was, "This reads just like fiction, like a really well done murder mystery, but ... it isn't fiction. It's real." This should be required reading for all hospital managers, at all levels. While I was reading it, I kept looking for something ... unusual, something surprising, other than the murders themselves. It all hung together, and it all made sense. Too much sense. I could imagine this happening, and couldn't see any way to I haven't read a book this quickly in a long time. My first reaction was, "This reads just like fiction, like a really well done murder mystery, but ... it isn't fiction. It's real." This should be required reading for all hospital managers, at all levels. While I was reading it, I kept looking for something ... unusual, something surprising, other than the murders themselves. It all hung together, and it all made sense. Too much sense. I could imagine this happening, and couldn't see any way to stop it that didn't involve some person or circumstance that is extraordinary, that does something unexpected. That is what is most terrifying about this. That it is so incredibly REASONABLE and awful at the same time. I know, since then, there have been changes in the laws to balance the dynamic of the rights of the patients and the rights of the hospitals. Things like this still happen. There are still coverups, still this awful balance between who you are protecting. Something milder but similar happened here last year. Not murder, but child pornography. Not 16 years but 6 months. Still. Aside from the credibility of the story itself, it is well told and well crafted. The detail is amazing. The consistent and orderly progression of the story, the murders, the movements, the investigation ... what will tip the balance? I can imagine the author surrounding himself with piles of papers and notes and outlines and recordings, trying to assemble all the myriad interviews and pieces of evidence into a coherent timeline, and then doing a second sort by the point of view, balancing and weighing the importance to the overall story. One other reviewer remarked that he wished there had been more about the actual confession. My interpretation is that those details were integrated throughout the rest of the story, comingled with the author's own interviews with Charles and the police and the informant. I loved the extremely clever pun in the title, how who is the good nurse changes throughout the telling of the tale, the layers of meaning in "good nurse," layers which are unfolded throughout the telling of the tale. It isn't a perfect book, but it is a Very Good Book and an Important Book. Don't read this book and think for one second that it couldn't happen again, or hasn't happened before. This is not a unique tale. This is perhaps the richest and most comprehensive telling of this type of series of events, and a call for change. Not just legal change, but a more widespread cultural change. Or, is there any change that could prevent things like this from happening? We can make it harder, more difficult, more challenging, but is it really possible to prevent it?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Neimark

    Spoiler alert in this review. A bit Raymond Chandler-esque--and slow to warm up, as the first 100 pp or more details the life of Charlie Cullen and how he kills the patients...and I found that a little boring because, ultimately pathology is inexplicable and as awful as it is, it's somehow not that interesting to read about it ad infinitum. But when we got to the detectives, and to the heroism of his friend, a nurse named Amy, and how they worked together to arrest him, then it became like a reall Spoiler alert in this review. A bit Raymond Chandler-esque--and slow to warm up, as the first 100 pp or more details the life of Charlie Cullen and how he kills the patients...and I found that a little boring because, ultimately pathology is inexplicable and as awful as it is, it's somehow not that interesting to read about it ad infinitum. But when we got to the detectives, and to the heroism of his friend, a nurse named Amy, and how they worked together to arrest him, then it became like a really good thriller. Complete with the cop dialogue... And once in jail, a really odd twist of fate, SPOILER ALERT, Charles ends up being asked to donate a kidney for the male relative of a former girlfriend--the request comes to him in jail, and it turns out he's a miraculous 6 for 6 antigen match. One of the nicer aspects of the book is it tries to show the complexity of its characters, without trying to explain it away. So in the end it is a very captivating book and it must've taken incredible amounts of hours of interviews just for the author to begin to get a grasp on it all. It is memorable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    This was a compelling story about a real-life serial murder, but the author managed to make you feel some sympathy for the killer, even if you couldn't condone his behavior. While I believe that madness and his ability to disconnect from his feelings of empathy for other people (psychopathic?) were his main motivations, I was also able to see how his childhood played a part in this madness. While the story became clinical and dry at times, especially in the latter half, it still remained compell This was a compelling story about a real-life serial murder, but the author managed to make you feel some sympathy for the killer, even if you couldn't condone his behavior. While I believe that madness and his ability to disconnect from his feelings of empathy for other people (psychopathic?) were his main motivations, I was also able to see how his childhood played a part in this madness. While the story became clinical and dry at times, especially in the latter half, it still remained compelling and I couldn't wait to find out how it all ended. The crazy thing is that despite how many people he killed, this is the first time I've heard of him. If you like nonfiction crime thrillers, this is definitely worth a read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kristy K

    4.5 Stars I knew little of this case before reading this book. Graeber does a great job at detailing Cullen's life and crimes as well as the investigation. Cullen, a nurse, indiscriminately killed hundreds of patients in his care over the span of his career. It is astounding that Cullen was able to get away with it for so long. Hospitals seemed more concerned with covering their butts and hiding indiscretions than they did about actual patient care and murder. I applaud the nurse and friend of Cu 4.5 Stars I knew little of this case before reading this book. Graeber does a great job at detailing Cullen's life and crimes as well as the investigation. Cullen, a nurse, indiscriminately killed hundreds of patients in his care over the span of his career. It is astounding that Cullen was able to get away with it for so long. Hospitals seemed more concerned with covering their butts and hiding indiscretions than they did about actual patient care and murder. I applaud the nurse and friend of Cullen's, Amy, for becoming a CI and potentially putting her career and life on the line for justice. I highly recommend this book to true crime fans.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle

    I discovered Charles Cullen case with this nonfiction. Charles Graeber portrays a very disturbed nurse, a sociopath who (probably) killed hundreds of patients by injecting them with lethal medication. He explains how Charles Cullen was able to work in nursing so long and with 9 different hospitals before getting caught. I found this book well documented and disturbing. The second part (the police investigation) kept all my attention. The detectives did a very good job!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Marotto

    I heard about this book on NPR. They were interviewing the writer. I've never read True Crime before, but this book sparked my interest. I read this book in two days. It has a fairly gruesome beginning that goes into detail about burn victims, and the medical treatment for them. Even though I work in medical (most likely why I was first interested in read The Good Nurse) I have a bit of a hard time getting through that chapter. But once I did inbound this book very difficult to put down. The aut I heard about this book on NPR. They were interviewing the writer. I've never read True Crime before, but this book sparked my interest. I read this book in two days. It has a fairly gruesome beginning that goes into detail about burn victims, and the medical treatment for them. Even though I work in medical (most likely why I was first interested in read The Good Nurse) I have a bit of a hard time getting through that chapter. But once I did inbound this book very difficult to put down. The author does a fanatic job at letting the reader form their own feelings about Charles Cullen. I felt he was subjective and honest when writing from his view point. I also felt the description of working in a hospital to be spot on. The only issue I had with this book was the ending. It was a bit too quick , even rushed. He did include an epilogue but that didn't satisfy me. I do recommend The Good Nurse to True Crime readers, suspense, and those who work in medical.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This was an odd book, to say the least. Marketed as true crime, the writing style is reminiscent of a fictional thriller. The author has clearly conducted long, in-depth interviews with Charlie Cullen and those involved in the years leading up to his arrest and subsequent conviction for the murders of at least forty individuals, however I found the way in which he presented his research to be often confusing and at times, irritating. Charlie Cullen is a deeply disturbed man with a long history of This was an odd book, to say the least. Marketed as true crime, the writing style is reminiscent of a fictional thriller. The author has clearly conducted long, in-depth interviews with Charlie Cullen and those involved in the years leading up to his arrest and subsequent conviction for the murders of at least forty individuals, however I found the way in which he presented his research to be often confusing and at times, irritating. Charlie Cullen is a deeply disturbed man with a long history of mental health issues and multiple suicide attempts scattered throughout his life; I actually lost count of how many times the author made reference to another suicide attempt. The book draws focus on the inadequacies within the American healthcare system; this is an alien concept to British readers such as myself. The issues surrounding the affordability of treatment, medicine and aftercare are prevalent throughout the book; another interesting aspect was how lawyers hold a close relationship with hospitals, whom, lets face it - are there to make money. I could fill the whole 20,000 word count here with reasons why healthcare should be free worldwide. Historically, there have been many notable cases of the so-called 'angels of death' - nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers who covertly murder patients in their care. Typically, these people are female and often either see themselves as mercy killers (alleviating pain and suffering) or they enjoy the thrill of resuscitating a patient. Charlie Cullen is a rare breed, a highly educated and knowledgeable nurse with many years experience, who begins to poison random patients (some of which he is looking after, some of which he isn't) for a variety of reasons. His victims ranged from young people dying of AIDS to people horrifically burnt in house fires. There didn't seem to be a notable pattern, perhaps is one of the reasons he was able to continue his murder spree for so long. How Cullen was able to jump from state to state, hospital to hospital, without so much as a backward glance says a lot about the security of how nurses in the US are regulated. As a nurse myself, the differences between regulation are staggering to how tabs are kept on our work history. For example, at one hospital where Cullen worked, drugs were extracted from the supply via a computerised system. But then the records are deleted after a period of thirty days, so after that time there was no way in which Cullen could be connected to the missing or misused drugs. I felt I learnt more about this case than I had known before; but I was still somewhat annoyed in the way the author described events and conversations. This is not a direct quote, but an example of what a lot of it read like: "Um... yeah." he said "Okay..." she said. Amy looked in the mirror and shuddered. The detective sighed and closed his hands around his cup of Dunkin' Doughnuts coffee. I DON'T CARE. Just tell me the facts - please don't use silly metaphors. Because of the writing style, it wasn't easy to judge this book as true crime. Like I mentioned earlier in my review, it felt as if, at times, I was reading some cheesy crime novel. I wouldn't recommend this book unless a) you are already familiar enough with the case to wish to know more or b) able to see past the irritating writing style.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    So here is the whole deal, dear reader: Charles Cullen is a serial killer nurse who injected his (up to 400, possibly?) victims with insulin and other presumably innocent drugs, rendering such victims, well, completely and appallingly victimized. I won't tell you much more than that, because honestly, dear reader and correct me if I'm wrong, that's a good enough hook right?, and I don't want to spoil what's really interesting about the book, i.e. slowly realizing the motive behind this madman's So here is the whole deal, dear reader: Charles Cullen is a serial killer nurse who injected his (up to 400, possibly?) victims with insulin and other presumably innocent drugs, rendering such victims, well, completely and appallingly victimized. I won't tell you much more than that, because honestly, dear reader and correct me if I'm wrong, that's a good enough hook right?, and I don't want to spoil what's really interesting about the book, i.e. slowly realizing the motive behind this madman's actions and the cat-and-mouse chase between police and suspect. However, one note I must note, and of which, dear reader, you should take note: the biggest revelation here is that the scariest villain in this book is not Mr. Charles Cullen, angel of death extraordinaire, no no no, the most nefarious dealings came from the hospitals (check that, multiple hospitalS) who discovered Cullen's unlicensed and unapproved euthanasias and quietly dismissed him to perform his dark work upon other unsuspecting hospitular inmates in other hospitable establishments.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sunya Jones

    I heard about this book on NPR and rushed out to buy it. Wow. what a book. This book took me through a flight of emotions. As a nurse of almost 17 years I was horrified, angry, confused, and believe it or not a bit tearful at the end. This book clouded my thoughts, invaded my dreams, made me fearful to push cancel at the accudose! The author does an outstanding job researching and telling this story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Moira Russell

    NYTBR: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/12/boo... NYT article: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/29/nyr... New York Mag article: http://nymag.com/news/features/30331/ NYTBR: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/12/boo... NYT article: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/29/nyr... New York Mag article: http://nymag.com/news/features/30331/

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Nixon

    This is the scariest psychological thriller I’ve ever read... and it’s all true (!) and made scarier by how the hospital oversight (or lack thereof) enabled him. While two laws were created to prevent this from happening again, I can’t sleep soundly knowing only 35 states have adopted them. This is a non-fiction book that is written in the style of a fiction thriller (which I like). It's a little like reading, instead of listening to, a crime podcast. Compared to others in the genre this is so-so This is the scariest psychological thriller I’ve ever read... and it’s all true (!) and made scarier by how the hospital oversight (or lack thereof) enabled him. While two laws were created to prevent this from happening again, I can’t sleep soundly knowing only 35 states have adopted them. This is a non-fiction book that is written in the style of a fiction thriller (which I like). It's a little like reading, instead of listening to, a crime podcast. Compared to others in the genre this is so-so. Graeber did a great job in collecting and assembling the information but the narrative can be weird as it glides in and out of being "editorial" to real-time dialogue. It's interesting (and scary!) I'm glad I picked this up on sale. The narrator was also so-so. There were points I thought the narrator was fantastic, but many more where I thought the narration was "okay" and a few times (especially in the beginning) when I thought it was the wrong voice completely. If you want a "thrilling" non-fiction book that's true crime, this is a good selection for you if you think this case is interesting. It's not too heavy or deep or drowning in too much information and details (vs. Helter Skelter, for example). It's presented lightly so you can follow along easily... a lot like a podcast.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Manley

    Good lord! Now this would make for a good documentary or short series on Netflix, but I don’t want Charlie Cullen to get any more of the fame he loves. This book followed Charles Cullen, ICU nurse of 16 years, through his various jobs at 9 different hospitals where he would kill patients through a variety of medication overdoses. What baffled me was that as each hospital found out what he was doing they only made him resign and then provided him with references to continue working elsewhere! Hos Good lord! Now this would make for a good documentary or short series on Netflix, but I don’t want Charlie Cullen to get any more of the fame he loves. This book followed Charles Cullen, ICU nurse of 16 years, through his various jobs at 9 different hospitals where he would kill patients through a variety of medication overdoses. What baffled me was that as each hospital found out what he was doing they only made him resign and then provided him with references to continue working elsewhere! Hospitals were more concerned with lawsuits and their reputation than they were about patient safety and blatant murders. Even as Somerset finally included the police, they still had Charlie working on the floor! I was stunned. It got good when the detectives involved Amy and she was puzzling together the medical understandings and the Pyxis realizations, it started to read like a good mystery where the solutions were falling into place. I’m glad he finally got caught but holy goddamn, 16 years of service and an approximated 400 victims later... Horrible.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (NO LONGER ACTIVE; he/him/his)

    CW: death, murder, attempted suicide (multiple occasions), and stalking Yep, this was amazing. I had never heard of Charles Cullen before this book, but now I'll never forget him in my life. He's a nurse serving around 400 years in jail for killing various patients. It's estimated that total could be up to 400 but no one really knows. He was convicted of 35. Basically, this book is amazing. Graeber captured the mindset Charles had with his killings and just captured everything amazingly. Honestly, CW: death, murder, attempted suicide (multiple occasions), and stalking Yep, this was amazing. I had never heard of Charles Cullen before this book, but now I'll never forget him in my life. He's a nurse serving around 400 years in jail for killing various patients. It's estimated that total could be up to 400 but no one really knows. He was convicted of 35. Basically, this book is amazing. Graeber captured the mindset Charles had with his killings and just captured everything amazingly. Honestly, this was such a well-researched book. I love how Graeber talked to so many different people for this. It was, really, amazing. An iconic true crime novel!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.