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As the conflict between Enosh and Damasca builds to war, Simon finds himself caught in the middle. Alin is bound by prophecy to the Grandmasters of Enosh, but he begins to doubt his fate when he discovers that their talk of freedom hides a darker agenda. Leah has never questioned her loyalty to Damasca. Now, she finds that allegiance tested as she is forced to stand against As the conflict between Enosh and Damasca builds to war, Simon finds himself caught in the middle. Alin is bound by prophecy to the Grandmasters of Enosh, but he begins to doubt his fate when he discovers that their talk of freedom hides a darker agenda. Leah has never questioned her loyalty to Damasca. Now, she finds that allegiance tested as she is forced to stand against her own rebellious brother. With these two powers on the brink of open war, the land soon trembles in the face of an even greater threat. Who can stand against the Wanderer?


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As the conflict between Enosh and Damasca builds to war, Simon finds himself caught in the middle. Alin is bound by prophecy to the Grandmasters of Enosh, but he begins to doubt his fate when he discovers that their talk of freedom hides a darker agenda. Leah has never questioned her loyalty to Damasca. Now, she finds that allegiance tested as she is forced to stand against As the conflict between Enosh and Damasca builds to war, Simon finds himself caught in the middle. Alin is bound by prophecy to the Grandmasters of Enosh, but he begins to doubt his fate when he discovers that their talk of freedom hides a darker agenda. Leah has never questioned her loyalty to Damasca. Now, she finds that allegiance tested as she is forced to stand against her own rebellious brother. With these two powers on the brink of open war, the land soon trembles in the face of an even greater threat. Who can stand against the Wanderer?

30 review for The Crimson Vault

  1. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    Damasca and Enosh find themselves preparing for war. Simon is torn about who to side with, Alin or his fellow Valinhall Travelers. As all this is happening an even worse threat emerges, the Valinhall Incarnation is free and intends to kill the king and anyone he deems unworthy. The Crimson Vault was a solid sequel to the House of Blades. It suffers from being the middle book in the series as it's trying to set a lot up at once. The most disappointing part is the increased point of view time from Damasca and Enosh find themselves preparing for war. Simon is torn about who to side with, Alin or his fellow Valinhall Travelers. As all this is happening an even worse threat emerges, the Valinhall Incarnation is free and intends to kill the king and anyone he deems unworthy. The Crimson Vault was a solid sequel to the House of Blades. It suffers from being the middle book in the series as it's trying to set a lot up at once. The most disappointing part is the increased point of view time from Alin, Leah, and some other travelers. Alin is a spectator for the majority of the book which leads to the reader learning seemingly all of Enosh's plans. Leah is important, but I find her uninteresting. I wanted to see more point of view chapters from Simon, Indirial, and any of the other Valinhall Travelers. I came to see them and got too much of Alin, Leah, and some random characters. The book took on a quite political storyline. Two opposing sides each with useful points, but unwilling to cooperate. The Damascans bound the uncontrollably powerful incarnations at the cost of 9 lives a year. The Enosh found that detestable and wish to free the Incarnations in order to stop the sacrifices. Yet they don't consider the possible devastation a single Incarnation could cause let alone all 10 of them. Neither side seems totally right or wrong. Either way people will suffer and die. The strength of the series continues to be the Valinhall Travelers. Simon and Indirial are the two characters I found myself being most interested in and concerned about. Kai is strange to put it mildly, but interesting. The book doesn't show enough about Denner to get a good feel for him, but he seems like a solid character when he appears. Honesty I would have enjoyed the book more if it was told entirely from their point of views. The Crimson Vault wasn't what I had hoped for, but it was good enough that I will be reading the next book shortly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Book Haunt

    The second installment of The Traveler’s Gate Trilogy opens several weeks after the events in House of Blades.   In the beginning, I felt as if I had missed the first 45 minutes of a film. I thought “who are some of these people?” and “what in the heck is going on now?” I admit, that could be because about halfway through the first book, my interest waned a bit. There is a nice bit of info that was missing from book one, but this book starts out with the same stilted dialogue and it’s almost as if The second installment of The Traveler’s Gate Trilogy opens several weeks after the events in House of Blades.   In the beginning, I felt as if I had missed the first 45 minutes of a film. I thought “who are some of these people?” and “what in the heck is going on now?” I admit, that could be because about halfway through the first book, my interest waned a bit. There is a nice bit of info that was missing from book one, but this book starts out with the same stilted dialogue and it’s almost as if the author is trying too hard to make up for lost time. There are too many magics, too many creatures, too many places, etc., all stuffed into the first half of this book.   "We are the Gar'rosh" the orange lizard-man said. In Naraka, we punish murderers." There are so many creatures the author runs out of names for them. "Something huge roared, and-- though Alin didn't turn around-- he would have bet it had a mouth full of razor-sharp teeth. The whole floor thundered as the whatever-it-was pounded down the hallway toward its prey." I think Will Wight has included every idea he’s ever had for a fantasy book here. At times, throughout the book, it seems as if he’s throwing stuff in randomly, out of nowhere.   I did really like that the prologue in book two gave us the same prologue as book one, but from another person’s point of view. That person just happened to be Indirial, the mysterious stranger who rescued Simon and his mother. I say, about time we got to meet Indirial!   At Valinhall, Simon is recuperating from injuries taken in battle. Tired of the politics of Enosh, he’s quite happy to be back even though everything at Valinhall tries to kill him. With his new advisors, Kai’s dolls, he is working on conquering more of the challenges that the house has to offer, so that he can acquire more powers.   Alin, Elysian Traveler and prophesied hero, has taken up residence in the Grandmasters’ Palace in Enosh. He is being hailed as a hero in Enosh for killing Overlord Malachi. He knows that Simon had a lot to do with that and he wants him by his side, even though the Grandmasters don’t like him. The Grandmasters are planning a war against Damasca, where they want to destroy the Trees that seal the Incarnations.   THAT'S RIGHT, FINALLY........about 80 pages into this book, Grandmaster Naraka explains to Alin what the Hanging Tree and the sacrifices were all about in the first book. "Anyway, we learned that Damasca had sealed a very powerful force at the center of the Latari Forest. It is to maintain this seal that the Damascans sacrifice nine lives every year." Leah has returned to the Damascan royal palace in Cana, where she is a potential successor to the throne, along with her other siblings. Her siblings are conniving to kill her father and take his place. Leah’s father has assigned her to keep an eye on Alin, and to gather information on the Grandmasters’ war plans. Leah has also decided to keep an eye on Simon and do everything she can to stop her brother Talos’s ascension to the throne.   When one of the Hanging Trees dies and the Valin Incarnation escapes, Leah’s father, King Zakareth of Damasca sends his Overlord, Indirial to kill it. While the Incarnation is slaughtering hundreds in its path, the Grandmasters are trying to catch up with it to acquire its aid in their attack on Damasca.   LET THE BATTLES BEGIN!!! Alin is fighting for Enosh, Leah is the heiress in Damasca and Simon is trying to stay neutral. It's really not clear which side I'm on.   There is a ton of action in this book and the second half of the book came together more cohesively. I would even say the end was great! I'm rather fond of two of the supporting characters, Indirial and Denner. It seems like there is a mystery character, Kathrin that these two refer to but she's never mentioned again. Maybe we'll learn more about her in the final book of the trilogy. Yes, it winds up that I can be counted in for City of Light. Hope it's good

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    5 Stars Crimson Vault, book two in the Travelers Gate series is a step up from the first novel. This series has: A coming of age story. Great world building. A likable lead that is easy to identify with. A cool main plot line. An awesome magic system. To me the magic of this book sets it apart. I am always looking for the next cool thing that can stand up with The Force, Allomancy, and of course Saidin/Saidar. Travelers are the magicians of this novel. They are people that can access one of 10 diffe 5 Stars Crimson Vault, book two in the Travelers Gate series is a step up from the first novel. This series has: A coming of age story. Great world building. A likable lead that is easy to identify with. A cool main plot line. An awesome magic system. To me the magic of this book sets it apart. I am always looking for the next cool thing that can stand up with The Force, Allomancy, and of course Saidin/Saidar. Travelers are the magicians of this novel. They are people that can access one of 10 different realms and as a result they have the abilities to channel that realm. Fire based, creature based, light based, and even healing, are just some of the realms main powers. None compare to the power of One, the realm of Valinhall, a place that bestows the individual skills for fighting and surviving. Oh yeah most importantly it gives the user the skill set to kill other Travelers. I loved the fast pace and dark undertones to his book. The magic is something special. Oh yeah...what about indestructible 7 foot long swords.... The Nye are creepy and cool. Book two takes place after the conclusion of the first. We are given only minor chapters that further develop Simon and others. We are however treated with much more action, violence, and sword wielding. The incarnation is beyond bad ass and ruthless. Leah's father is Kingly in every fashion and he stole some of the limelight of this book. This is series is tailor made to my likes and as a result I devoured both of these books and immediately grabbed the conclusion. I cannot wait to read more from this series. I highly recommend it to those looking for a magic laced, dark fantasy series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Esme

    up until 5am finishing this. review to come when im conscious again.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Dix

    Will Wight is a God! Holy H E Double Hockey Sticks. I've just finished The Crimson Vault and let me just say that I...kind of sort of enjoyed...okay who am I kidding?! It was amazing! Several twists that I did not see coming, cool new powers, expanded lore, everything I could of wanted in a sequel. Dang, son!! No really, Will delivered in every way possible. All I have to say in closing is SHAME ON HIM FOR MAKING ME WAIT UNTIL NEXT FRIGGIN YEAR FOR THE THIRD BOOK. HOW DARE HE ATTEMPT TO HAVE SOME Will Wight is a God! Holy H E Double Hockey Sticks. I've just finished The Crimson Vault and let me just say that I...kind of sort of enjoyed...okay who am I kidding?! It was amazing! Several twists that I did not see coming, cool new powers, expanded lore, everything I could of wanted in a sequel. Dang, son!! No really, Will delivered in every way possible. All I have to say in closing is SHAME ON HIM FOR MAKING ME WAIT UNTIL NEXT FRIGGIN YEAR FOR THE THIRD BOOK. HOW DARE HE ATTEMPT TO HAVE SOME SEMBLANCE OF A LIFE!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lazybee

    Excellent read. Too many twists. Loved it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mueller

    This was another fun and exciting read. It won't win any awards for being deep or philosophical literature, but it's exactly the kind of fantasy I most enjoy reading: fun and full of action with characters I love to root for. It had been a while since a read the first book, so it took me some time to get back into the swing of things. Once I did, though, I was along for the read. Wight is a very good storyteller. Rating: 9/10

  8. 5 out of 5

    RC1140

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This series has gotten me fairly engaged in it, while it may not be everyone's cup of tea, I do enjoy the uniqueness of each of the territories. I do feel that everyone powers up a little bit too fast and that it felt a little too much like an anime in terms of the power curve for the characters. This didnt hurt it that much because it keeps the story moving along at a really good pace. Though some fights tend to end way faster than I would have liked or are just too simple I did forget one or tw This series has gotten me fairly engaged in it, while it may not be everyone's cup of tea, I do enjoy the uniqueness of each of the territories. I do feel that everyone powers up a little bit too fast and that it felt a little too much like an anime in terms of the power curve for the characters. This didnt hurt it that much because it keeps the story moving along at a really good pace. Though some fights tend to end way faster than I would have liked or are just too simple I did forget one or two characters between the books, but the character cast is not crazy. There are what feels like a number of in consequential characters which come and go, but I like that the author doesn't mind sacrificing characters as needed (though sadly its not nearly as impactful as it should be). This too me is possibly the biggest issue with the book, aside from the main protagonist there isnt a great bond between the reader and the characters which leaves you with a bit of a 'meh' effect when things affect most characters. The plotting and scheming seems quite basic, but I have a feeling things will be getting more interesting from this book onwards. Overall while I had a number of negative things to say about the book, my overall enjoyment of the book was high. I still feel that if you enjoyed the first book this one has got to be on your too read list. For new comers to the series, I think the first book is a good piece to judge the series on. If it leaves you wanting more then this book will fulfill.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Torstein Rødset

    Its not often I touch anything with the "Young Adult" tag from fear of overexposure to hollow powerfantasy characters and awkward romantic plots. Lucky for me, this book is such a pleasure to read that I can overlook the shallow characters and just enjoy it. The magic system is very cool and it makes me just want to read more in the same universe. And the "over-the-top-Final-Fantasy" Battles are also very enjoyable to read. This is a very easy read and I very much recommend it if you want a break f Its not often I touch anything with the "Young Adult" tag from fear of overexposure to hollow powerfantasy characters and awkward romantic plots. Lucky for me, this book is such a pleasure to read that I can overlook the shallow characters and just enjoy it. The magic system is very cool and it makes me just want to read more in the same universe. And the "over-the-top-Final-Fantasy" Battles are also very enjoyable to read. This is a very easy read and I very much recommend it if you want a break from the more hardcore series out there. Will read the sequel!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yossi

    This book is a major improvement over the first in the series. It steers away from the YA style into the realms of fantasy. The pacing is exact, the world-building is interesting, and the plot draws you in.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mahesh Nakka

    Better than first one. Like I said in the first book review, Wight's first books will be normal but then he makes things awesome and awesome from the second book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Coco.V

    🎁 The Traveler's Gate Trilogy is FREE on Amazon today (3/17/2020)! 🎁

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Lupa

    I liked this one better than the first, probably because there was a thematic switch in how power dynamics were playing out. Anyways, it's good for what it is.

  14. 5 out of 5

    R.J. Triveri

    The Crimson Vault was a bit predictable as to what would happen, but I continue to really enjoy the magic system and series as a whole.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    I just really have fun with this series, even though I got kind of embarrassed realizing it is somewhat if not very similar to some of the animated "Japanese- style" cartoon's. Giant swords, incredible "Pokemon" type creatures... ( no I have not watched but in passing, but this takes nothing away from the story and the enjoyment of these novels. The "territories" that the people draw power from and the "house" that is a main factor in the story as it is made to be able to destroy the other terri I just really have fun with this series, even though I got kind of embarrassed realizing it is somewhat if not very similar to some of the animated "Japanese- style" cartoon's. Giant swords, incredible "Pokemon" type creatures... ( no I have not watched but in passing, but this takes nothing away from the story and the enjoyment of these novels. The "territories" that the people draw power from and the "house" that is a main factor in the story as it is made to be able to destroy the other territories or maintain balance is like having so many world's ,dimensions that have so much imagination that I myself explore even when not reading the book, this is what makes these kind of novels for my personally, very surprised at this find, reminds me of the (shattered sigil), and the (night angel trilogy) Best of all the third novel is due in March, so I will be able to wrap it up... second book leaves ya hanging, But the author included 2 short story novels I believe about gaining some of the "powers' I really liked the book's, again I rate on My enjoyment I am not very critical on grammar or structure well not so much, not a fan of first person ect. but ya fun enjoyable read"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cassie Lee

    This book is a fantastic follow-up to the previous book. The main character continues to grow in a way that is believable and entertaining. The story goes easily forward without any real lulls or feeling too rushed. I'm looking forward to the third installment, which will hopefully be out very soon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    This book is even better than the previous one. I love this unique fantasy world, and the story is exciting enough that the book was extremely hard to put down. The main character was a bit whiny at first, but he grows up pretty quick. I highly recommend this book. It's indie, so it's definitely worth the price.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristobelle

    Great Stuff! As much fun as book one, though a little darker in tone - which I appreciated! A little tighter, a bit better structured, more evenly paced. Will Wight does an awesome job narrating his own book once again, there's something extra special about an author reading their own words. Now the wait till book #3 has audio.. The anticipation is strong!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robby

    This book was amazing, just as strong as the previous one if not better with more back-story and lore. The characters continue to be developed and change throughout the book. Simon becomes less wishy-washy, Alin becomes less of a dick, and Leah's become a bit more honest with herself. Recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Хинић Александар

    It's getting really interesting :))

  21. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    If you enjoyed the first book, then don't hesitate to pick up the second. I was hoping to see if it would pick up beyond House of Blades, but it was a bit more of the same.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Espen

    The Crimson Vault starts with the same scene that initiates Simon's hero's journey in House of Blades, from the point of view of one of the other participants. If anything, this initial tragedy is even more gripping, now that we know something of who Simon is. Not only that, but we now get to see something of the character of Indirial, the Valinhall Traveler who chose to save Simon's life on that rainy day. I was moved by the very human reason that spurred Indirial to intervene: Indirial was a fa The Crimson Vault starts with the same scene that initiates Simon's hero's journey in House of Blades, from the point of view of one of the other participants. If anything, this initial tragedy is even more gripping, now that we know something of who Simon is. Not only that, but we now get to see something of the character of Indirial, the Valinhall Traveler who chose to save Simon's life on that rainy day. I was moved by the very human reason that spurred Indirial to intervene: Indirial was a father, and he didn't want to see a child die if he could help it. I did not expect this, in House of Blades, Indirial was mostly a looming figure, painted in shades of black [no, really, he always wears black]. With this one detail, Wight started to flesh him out into a real character. There really are few comic book villains or heroes in the Traveler's Gate trilogy. Almost everyone has a reasonable motivation somewhere along the line. Simon, son of Kalman, is moderately introspective, but neither talkative nor gifted in seeing into other men's souls. Thus, Simon does not often stop to inquire why the people he is bludgeoning or stabbing would do the things that they do. Fortunately for us, there are a number of other characters in the book more interested in these things, and more adept at drawing them out, so we get to see a remarkable amount of moral complexity. We also see conniving, backstabbing, greed for power, and pride in ample measures. Then there are miscommunications, judgments made from partial information, and motives that while otherwise just, simply work at cross-purposes with what someone else wants. When evil is done, it is not uncommonly because inflamed passions, or personality defects combined with a surfeit of power, run away with someone. Unfortunately, there is a great deal of injustice in the world, some of it of venerable antiquity, which provides lots of opportunities for further evil to be done in the name of vengeance. Simon's world doesn't really lack for justice. There is a whole Territory devoted to it in fact. Unfortunately, the unflinching attitude of Narakan Travelers illustrates what happens when any one good is pursued without regard for the others, swollen to madness in isolation. Every Territory is like that: an embodiment of a virtue that has gone so far in a quest for perfection that you literally cannot see any of the other virtues from where you find yourself. Every Territory is isolated from the others. What it all calls for is something like we get in the long-lost tenth Territory, Elysium, a harmonious whole of the other nine Territories and their corresponding virtues. In practice, it seems not to work out so well. I am not surprised. The reason for this is that courage is not the mid-point or balance between cowardice and rashness. Rather, it is the golden mean, or the third way, or the synthesis of the other two. All of the Territories tend to just embody their respective virtues turned up to 11. This excess of virtue is bad enough on its own, but when you mix them all up together without anything to put them in order, bad things happen. What will put them in order is not some kind of blend of everything turned up as far as it goes, which is Elysium, but phronesis [φρόνησῐς], the art of practical wisdom. Interestingly, Aristotle associated this virtue in particular with politics, and we see that the one Territory that has tried to put some kind of order to the world is Ragnarus, the territory of power, domination, and rule. Of course, they screw it up too, because Ragnarus is just domination turned up to 11. The ruling dynasty even practices a kind of post-natal embryo selection like the Ottomans did on their heirs to find the best successor. But at least in principle, this is where harmony could come from. But in order to do that, the Ragnarus dynasty would have to learn to let the other things in the world be what they are.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rinaldo

    4.25/5 The Crimson Vault is the second instalment of Traveler's Gate trilogy. It picks up the plot from House of Blades while introducing new threats and expanding the world.. Expanded Worldbuilding Worldbuilding is one of my favourite aspect in fantasy. I can gloss over mediocre characters if the world is really interesting. In case of Traveler's Gate, it has fairly solid characters along with fascinating Territories worldbuilding. The Crimson Vault particularly expands the world from what has bee 4.25/5 The Crimson Vault is the second instalment of Traveler's Gate trilogy. It picks up the plot from House of Blades while introducing new threats and expanding the world.. Expanded Worldbuilding Worldbuilding is one of my favourite aspect in fantasy. I can gloss over mediocre characters if the world is really interesting. In case of Traveler's Gate, it has fairly solid characters along with fascinating Territories worldbuilding. The Crimson Vault particularly expands the world from what has been established in the previous book while fleshing out more characters. A lot of Territories other than Valinhall and Elysia are given more highlights in this book, especially Ragnarus. With showcases of seasoned Valinhall Travelers in action, I find Valinhall powers are extremely practical and deadly with a touch of coolness factor. On other hand, they lack the flashiness of other Territories. However, Will Wight managed to make Valinhall tests and powers more fun. It's a good balance of litRPG and high fantasy, where the tests can organically fit into any JRPG subquests without sacrificing the plot itself. You can easily imagine Valinhall Travelers calling down the powers and artefacts from the House, complete with cooling down period and duration. However, unlike some hard litRPG out there, there are no strictly stats, numbers, and GUI/menu windows which I personally find distracting and immersion breaking. The characters' power growth is also reasonably well paced. There are no 'cheat skills' so to speak, as the characters have to work hard for them, or pay a hefty price. In regards of exposition, I think Will Wight did a great job with infodump and organic exposition. Only here and there characters will explain new bits explicitly. Most of the time the reader has to draw conclusion themselves based on the dialogue. Plot and Characters The Crimson Vault introduces new villains and threats to the series. Like it predecessor, this book manages to make the villains look sympathetic, especially Talos and King Zakareth VI. Incarnations were only briefly mentioned in the previous book, but in this instalment they are given much bigger highlights. The main characters, on other hand, are fairly passive in this book. Simon and Alin are mostly hang around and react to events. They take actions but often those are reaction of a plot development. Leah is much more proactive in this book, but I don't really find her character arc particularly interesting or strong. Conclusion The Crimson Vault is another solid entry from Will Wight. It doesn't necessarily suffer from the mid book syndrome as it's full of action, reveal, and character development. It does end in cliffhangers that leave you wanting more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Farrell Keeling

    Hurtles you headfirst, smack-bang, right in the middle of the action from the get-go. Will Wight builds on his debut self-pub, House of Blades, continuing a theme of fast-paced action within a confined but expanded number of pages. Now, the story: The short of it is that Simon, (son of Kalman), now a considerably deadly Valinhall Traveler (no time to go into the whole Traveler's Territory and powers... trust me), is torn between helping the nation of his parent's murderers, (so he thinks), Damasc Hurtles you headfirst, smack-bang, right in the middle of the action from the get-go. Will Wight builds on his debut self-pub, House of Blades, continuing a theme of fast-paced action within a confined but expanded number of pages. Now, the story: The short of it is that Simon, (son of Kalman), now a considerably deadly Valinhall Traveler (no time to go into the whole Traveler's Territory and powers... trust me), is torn between helping the nation of his parent's murderers, (so he thinks), Damasca, and assisting its sworn enemy, Enosh. Enosh and its Grandmasters, on the other hand, hope to defeat Damasca with the help of a slightly arrogant, prophetic hero in Alin, by burning down some pretty swanky magical trees (I can say no more). Leah, meanwhile, has her own allegiances to the Damascan throne to consider, though things are more than complicated with regards to her family. My initial impression, whilst reading the second instalment of the Traveler's Gate Trilogy, was that perhaps it seemed almost cramped into its 380 pages, considering the sheer amount of story that flits by you at breakneck speed. However, given Wight's voice appears to thrive in its haste, I think, had the page count expanded in any way, it might have detracted from its enjoyment. My only real criticism is that I feel perhaps too many characters, though they are, for the most part, well fleshed out in The Crimson Vault, are present and so it can be slightly difficult to keep up with at times. All in all, the story seemed to evolve well and developed its three main characters interestingly. Although I didn't particularly enjoy Alin's or Leah's story threads as much as Simon's in House of Blades, I found them both vastly improved come the sequel. Indeed, it's worth flying through The Crimson Vault to see where the story takes Alin alone! 4.5 stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Morris

    The second installment to will wights travellers trilogy really brings stuff together and allows you to see more of the amazing magic that is so different to other books. Although I lost my footing a little at the beginning I soon gained it again once the action really kicked off and things where more explained. Simon really seems like he has progressed as a fighter, but you soon discover he still has a long way to go to have the power and skills of the other Valinhall travelers. There is some g The second installment to will wights travellers trilogy really brings stuff together and allows you to see more of the amazing magic that is so different to other books. Although I lost my footing a little at the beginning I soon gained it again once the action really kicked off and things where more explained. Simon really seems like he has progressed as a fighter, but you soon discover he still has a long way to go to have the power and skills of the other Valinhall travelers. There is some great twist and turns that really show more sides to characters. One perticular battle allows you to see another approach to using the powers of Valinhall with an object . I never put this book down and finished it within no time. Cannot wait to start the next book to see what happens to certain a characters roles now they have been changed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **spoilers, for my own records** Damn. Alin, an incarnation. Leah, the queen. Her father, zakareth, still alive at the end, but the new Ragnarus incarnation? I enjoyed how there's no real "good" side -- although the Enosh are definitely bad, and super cult-y, and just want to release the incarnations to destroy everything. The Ragnarus kingdom definitely isn't good, but the sacrifices were for the greater good, to keep the incarnations imprisoned... This book was super action packed and impossible **spoilers, for my own records** Damn. Alin, an incarnation. Leah, the queen. Her father, zakareth, still alive at the end, but the new Ragnarus incarnation? I enjoyed how there's no real "good" side -- although the Enosh are definitely bad, and super cult-y, and just want to release the incarnations to destroy everything. The Ragnarus kingdom definitely isn't good, but the sacrifices were for the greater good, to keep the incarnations imprisoned... This book was super action packed and impossible to put down. I don't *love* any of the characters, but I'm definitely rooting for Simon and Kai. Simon finally defeated Valin, which felt earned at the end (and with some help from Leah's ability...) I wonder what will happen to Alin. He's definitely a pompous ass, but he has redeeming qualities and I don't want him to die. :(

  27. 4 out of 5

    Russell Gray

    I really enjoyed this book and I'm also very impressed by the fact that the author kept me keyed in during the Leah and Alin pov sections as well. I personally found Simon to be the most interesting character and the events surrounding him to be the most interesting as well (House of Blades > City of Elysia imo) and it's honestly a problem that I find myself having often with books that employ two or two pov characters: I couldn't give 2 shits about the other characters or what they're doing. As I really enjoyed this book and I'm also very impressed by the fact that the author kept me keyed in during the Leah and Alin pov sections as well. I personally found Simon to be the most interesting character and the events surrounding him to be the most interesting as well (House of Blades > City of Elysia imo) and it's honestly a problem that I find myself having often with books that employ two or two pov characters: I couldn't give 2 shits about the other characters or what they're doing. As I previously said, I didn't have a problem with that while reading this book and I consider that a testament to how colorful and engrossing the world and story events were. While I wasn't as interested in Alin and can't say that I liked him that much, I still found him very relatable and tragic. The author did a great job of presenting stakes for all the characters and I think that was the key to keeping me immersed at all times. A very refreshing quality to find for me lately. I can't recommend this series enough so far and am eager to start the 3rd book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Rizk

    Great magical world. Awesome action and world building. The characters aren't too complex, but they're fleshed out enough, and the action is thoroughly engaging, that you don't notice it. In the last book of this series, Simon, the MC, gains a lot more in character and purpose, so I recommend reading to the end. As for the action, I tend to skim war scenes to get the gist and move on, instead of reading my way through a slog of sword slashings and swingings, but the fights here were very central Great magical world. Awesome action and world building. The characters aren't too complex, but they're fleshed out enough, and the action is thoroughly engaging, that you don't notice it. In the last book of this series, Simon, the MC, gains a lot more in character and purpose, so I recommend reading to the end. As for the action, I tend to skim war scenes to get the gist and move on, instead of reading my way through a slog of sword slashings and swingings, but the fights here were very central to the plot, and involved a bunch of magic along with the sword slashing, that I rarely grew bored of reading it though completely. Definitely a great series. Warning: get all three at once, because it's effectively one long book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Philip Mastandrea

    An improvement upon the first book in the trilogy. Much more is explained to us. My biggest problem with this one is the two main characters, Simon and Alin, could have had such a more impactful relationship through the series, but we only got a few pages (if that) in the first book to set up their relationship. Are they friends? Are they frenemies? Did Alin look down on Simon? Did Alin ignore Simon? We don't really know and with a few more chapters of village living backstory, we could have had An improvement upon the first book in the trilogy. Much more is explained to us. My biggest problem with this one is the two main characters, Simon and Alin, could have had such a more impactful relationship through the series, but we only got a few pages (if that) in the first book to set up their relationship. Are they friends? Are they frenemies? Did Alin look down on Simon? Did Alin ignore Simon? We don't really know and with a few more chapters of village living backstory, we could have had a more meaningful arc for both of them. That said, I'm looking forward to finishing the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alec North

    I read Will Wight's Unsouled series before I started these books and really wanted more of that world. These books were written before that series, and I think that Wight's progress as a writer can be seen if you compare the two. The book isn't bad by any means. I'm enjoying the story and the writing isn't bad. It just feels a little flat. That being said it is still an entertaining ride and I plan on finishing the series.

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