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Domestic Violence and the Islamic Tradition

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How do modern Muslims' attitudes to marital violence and patriarchy relate to the Islamic tradition? In recent years, discussion regarding the interpretation of the Qur'an has become highly controversial. Especially contentious is passage 4:34, which covers the legitimacy of marital violence and the subjugation of women within Islam. Scholarly opinion on the topic is heavil How do modern Muslims' attitudes to marital violence and patriarchy relate to the Islamic tradition? In recent years, discussion regarding the interpretation of the Qur'an has become highly controversial. Especially contentious is passage 4:34, which covers the legitimacy of marital violence and the subjugation of women within Islam. Scholarly opinion on the topic is heavily influenced by contemporary context, so the issue remains largely unsettled. While pre-colonial Islamic jurists permitted the use of violence against women, they still held ethical concerns about the disciplinary privileges of husbands. Consequently, the debate for these early scholars was focussed on the level of violence permitted, and how to apply the three disciplinary steps: admonishment, abandonment, and physical abuse. Ayesha Chaudhry argues that all living religious traditions are rooted in a patriarchal, social, and historical context, and they need ways to reconcile gender egalitarian values with religious tradition. Post-colonial, modern Islamic scholars that consult the Qur'an for gender-egalitarian interpretations must confront a difficult and unique debate: equality vs authority. As in many religions, authority is derived from tradition, rebelling from which results in a loss of authority in the eyes of the community. Chaudhry reveals that Muslims do not speak with one voice about Islam. Instead, Muslim scholarly discourse is spirited and diverse. The voices of contemporary Muslim scholars enrich the scope of the 'Islamic tradition'. Many recent works on Islam strive to promote a 'public relations' image of Islam. This book deals with ethical problems of domestic violence as discussed in historic and contemporary Islamic religious doctrine. The stakes are high, and very real. The author confronts the significant issue of how modern Muslims can relate to Islamic tradition and the Qur'anic text.


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How do modern Muslims' attitudes to marital violence and patriarchy relate to the Islamic tradition? In recent years, discussion regarding the interpretation of the Qur'an has become highly controversial. Especially contentious is passage 4:34, which covers the legitimacy of marital violence and the subjugation of women within Islam. Scholarly opinion on the topic is heavil How do modern Muslims' attitudes to marital violence and patriarchy relate to the Islamic tradition? In recent years, discussion regarding the interpretation of the Qur'an has become highly controversial. Especially contentious is passage 4:34, which covers the legitimacy of marital violence and the subjugation of women within Islam. Scholarly opinion on the topic is heavily influenced by contemporary context, so the issue remains largely unsettled. While pre-colonial Islamic jurists permitted the use of violence against women, they still held ethical concerns about the disciplinary privileges of husbands. Consequently, the debate for these early scholars was focussed on the level of violence permitted, and how to apply the three disciplinary steps: admonishment, abandonment, and physical abuse. Ayesha Chaudhry argues that all living religious traditions are rooted in a patriarchal, social, and historical context, and they need ways to reconcile gender egalitarian values with religious tradition. Post-colonial, modern Islamic scholars that consult the Qur'an for gender-egalitarian interpretations must confront a difficult and unique debate: equality vs authority. As in many religions, authority is derived from tradition, rebelling from which results in a loss of authority in the eyes of the community. Chaudhry reveals that Muslims do not speak with one voice about Islam. Instead, Muslim scholarly discourse is spirited and diverse. The voices of contemporary Muslim scholars enrich the scope of the 'Islamic tradition'. Many recent works on Islam strive to promote a 'public relations' image of Islam. This book deals with ethical problems of domestic violence as discussed in historic and contemporary Islamic religious doctrine. The stakes are high, and very real. The author confronts the significant issue of how modern Muslims can relate to Islamic tradition and the Qur'anic text.

39 review for Domestic Violence and the Islamic Tradition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Daud Khan

    A very comprehensive discussion of what pre-colonial scholars thought about Islam's position on domestic violence. It lists the relevant commentaries, and talks about the various Quranic verses and ahadith which these scholars used to justify their stand, and the how those very same sources are used by progressives today to reinterpret the verse at the center of the entire discussion : Quran 4:34. I was especially aghast at how some scholars justified marital rape in quite explicit terms. Overal A very comprehensive discussion of what pre-colonial scholars thought about Islam's position on domestic violence. It lists the relevant commentaries, and talks about the various Quranic verses and ahadith which these scholars used to justify their stand, and the how those very same sources are used by progressives today to reinterpret the verse at the center of the entire discussion : Quran 4:34. I was especially aghast at how some scholars justified marital rape in quite explicit terms. Overall, an indispensable read for understanding domestic violence in the Islamic tradition. Small quibble : The author states according to al-Kasani, one of the options available to a husband (when he has abandoned his wife for "nushooz", as per 4:34) is to force himself on his wife without her permission, whenever he so desires (so he himself doesn't suffer on account of the wife's nushooz) . She notes that according to him, this man can can become intimate with her, "when he is overcome with desire for her, and not that the time when she needs him". This is not giving him permission to force himself on her without her permission, but rather specifying that the act should not be performed on the behest (or the enjoyment) of the wife, but rather on the initiation of the husband. The wife doesn't have to "need him" in order to agree (voluntarily) to the act. As such, this particular instance cannot be used as an example of someone allowing marital rape. His other examples seem to be fine though

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zahra Khan

    Everyone needs to read this book to disillusion ourselves of traditional Islamic scholarship's ability to respond to the cause of gender justice. Dr. Chaudhry and other feminist scholars of Islam are truly doing amazing work to bring light to Muslim women's lives.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Evie Mcduff

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eva Forslund

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tai

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    Ess

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    Esraa

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

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    Luckyfatima

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    PB

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    Hamza

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    Nadia

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    Loretta

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    زهرا

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    Alex Shams

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    Amar Baines

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    Khadijah Bhatti

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    Rohail Waseem

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    Janet Morris

  30. 4 out of 5

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    Armin Navabi

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  34. 5 out of 5

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    Sofia

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    Andrew Meintzer

  37. 5 out of 5

    Fatima

  38. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Saad

  39. 4 out of 5

    Annette Anderson

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