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Zero Six Bravo: The Explosive True Story of How 60 Special Forces Survived Against an Iraqi Army of 100,000

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In February 2003 sixty elite operators from the SBS, with SAS embeds, were sent 1,000 kilometers behind enemy lines to take the surrender of a 120,000-strong Iraqi army in a mission that seemed lunatic from the start. Caught in a ferocious ambush by vastly superior forces, the unit launched an epic bid to escape, inflicting carnage on their enemies. Running low on fuel and In February 2003 sixty elite operators from the SBS, with SAS embeds, were sent 1,000 kilometers behind enemy lines to take the surrender of a 120,000-strong Iraqi army in a mission that seemed lunatic from the start. Caught in a ferocious ambush by vastly superior forces, the unit launched an epic bid to escape, inflicting carnage on their enemies. Running low on fuel and ammunition, and with their surviving vehicles shot to shreds, they faced dwindling options as the Iraqis closed in. The unit blew their vehicles, destroyed sensitive kit and prepared for death or capture . . . This is the untold true story of the most desperate battle fought by British and allied Special Forces trapped behind enemy lines since World War Two.


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In February 2003 sixty elite operators from the SBS, with SAS embeds, were sent 1,000 kilometers behind enemy lines to take the surrender of a 120,000-strong Iraqi army in a mission that seemed lunatic from the start. Caught in a ferocious ambush by vastly superior forces, the unit launched an epic bid to escape, inflicting carnage on their enemies. Running low on fuel and In February 2003 sixty elite operators from the SBS, with SAS embeds, were sent 1,000 kilometers behind enemy lines to take the surrender of a 120,000-strong Iraqi army in a mission that seemed lunatic from the start. Caught in a ferocious ambush by vastly superior forces, the unit launched an epic bid to escape, inflicting carnage on their enemies. Running low on fuel and ammunition, and with their surviving vehicles shot to shreds, they faced dwindling options as the Iraqis closed in. The unit blew their vehicles, destroyed sensitive kit and prepared for death or capture . . . This is the untold true story of the most desperate battle fought by British and allied Special Forces trapped behind enemy lines since World War Two.

30 review for Zero Six Bravo: The Explosive True Story of How 60 Special Forces Survived Against an Iraqi Army of 100,000

  1. 4 out of 5

    Igor Ljubuncic

    Here comes the hotstepper. So, a review. First, I feel kind of sad for the British SF. They always operate on thin margins, and never that awesome and expensive array of cool stuff that the Americans have. They also never fail to mention that. But then, it makes sense. War is expensive. This book followes the team of SAS/SBS going into Iraq to ask the Iraqi 5th Division, some 100,000 men, to surrender. As you can imagine, this does not go as planned. Fighting ensues. The special forces are in retr Here comes the hotstepper. So, a review. First, I feel kind of sad for the British SF. They always operate on thin margins, and never that awesome and expensive array of cool stuff that the Americans have. They also never fail to mention that. But then, it makes sense. War is expensive. This book followes the team of SAS/SBS going into Iraq to ask the Iraqi 5th Division, some 100,000 men, to surrender. As you can imagine, this does not go as planned. Fighting ensues. The special forces are in retreat, followed by an army of terrain-savvy Fadaeen in 4x4 Toyota pick up technicals with 12.7mm guns, army regulars in Kraz-225 trucks, and for dessert (desert, ha ha!), a bunch of T-72 tanks with thermal imaging. The Brits have a bunch of underpowered Pinkies (Land Rovers), some machine guns, and Lancastershire curry. Stay chipper. A very enjoyable read. It's similar to the story of Pathfinders in Sierra Leone - 26 men against 2,000 rebels - Operation Mayhem, and even the writing style is similar. Heaney becomes Grey, a grizzled veteran with a simplistic, jaded outlook on life. Well, kind of expected for the kind of lifestyle. The one thing you might find ... missing is that the author does not go into emotions, it's all very factual. Contrast this with Black Hawk Down, where you get the personal perspective of what's happening. In this book, similar to Operation Mayhem, but to an ever greater degree, it's enemy south, enemy north, things are as follows, no doubts, no pain. A bit too much like a sitrep. Furthermore, the language is definitely simple - it's a worker man's language, not an academy thesis. But it's clear and captivating enough. You also get your expected dose of British jargon, like kip, stag, brew, knackered, dog's bollocks, and a somewhat repetitive use of the words legion and sparking, something just a few paragraphs apart. One last thing - there's also a factual error - they refer to the F-16's cannon as 21mm 7-barrel Gatling-type weapon, but it is in fact a 20mm 6-barrel gun. There. All that said, this is a captivating tale, especially more so because of the crazy odds, and the fact the British soldiers lacked the necessary firepower to conduct warfare on equal footing with the Iraqis. They didn't have AT weapons, and even the air support could only give them sonic booms for cover. It's a weird, bizarre, crazy story, and while the action is short and tight, it's riverting, and quite recommended for military history buffs. No Hollywood glamor that's for sure. A can of spam in the best case. And some rather awesome humor. That one is never amiss. Spot on mates, dog's bollocks, THE proverbial. Gets me every time. Enjoy, Igor

  2. 5 out of 5

    Keith McArdle

    First, let me start by writing that this is a real story and the events described in it are non-fiction, which makes it even more amazing. When M SQN of the Special Boat Service (SBS: the Navy equivelant of the SAS) was tasked with infiltrating Northern Iraq and forcing the Iraqi 5th Corps to surrender, they didn't know what they were in for. 60 sepcial forces operators and twenty modified Land Rovers against 100, 000 Iraqi soldiers supported by main battle tanks and heavy machine guns. British "in First, let me start by writing that this is a real story and the events described in it are non-fiction, which makes it even more amazing. When M SQN of the Special Boat Service (SBS: the Navy equivelant of the SAS) was tasked with infiltrating Northern Iraq and forcing the Iraqi 5th Corps to surrender, they didn't know what they were in for. 60 sepcial forces operators and twenty modified Land Rovers against 100, 000 Iraqi soldiers supported by main battle tanks and heavy machine guns. British "intelligence" suggested that the 5th Corps' morale was low, they weren't going to fight and would more than likely surrender at the first sight of M SQN. Unfortuantely, nothing could be further from the truth. An incredible story of courage, resilience and dogged determination in the face of insurmountable odds. This book is well written and I found it difficult to put down. I hadn't heard of M SQN's plight before, which was part of the reason I purchased the book. I'm glad I did. An incredible true story. I highly recommend it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deferrers

    A long winded account that really could have been halved in its publication. Repeated facts and opinions that made you want to just get to the key events. A good insight though in to what our Special Forces have to endure. One has to ask who dreamt up this whole Operation as it was a lack of forethought and tactical support that let our forces down yet again. One Chinook, come on!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dachokie

    Modern Day Thermopylae … This book was reviewed as part of Amazon's Vine program which included a free advance copy of the book. Maybe I had at one point, but considering the flood of daring Spec Op stories these days, it is understandable that only the most recent exploits are memorable. With that being said, Damien Lewis’ ZERO SIX BRAVO details one such mission that I was previously unaware of: A group of 60 British special operators sneaking deep into Iraq to seek the surrender of the 100,000 s Modern Day Thermopylae … This book was reviewed as part of Amazon's Vine program which included a free advance copy of the book. Maybe I had at one point, but considering the flood of daring Spec Op stories these days, it is understandable that only the most recent exploits are memorable. With that being said, Damien Lewis’ ZERO SIX BRAVO details one such mission that I was previously unaware of: A group of 60 British special operators sneaking deep into Iraq to seek the surrender of the 100,000 strong Iraqi Army’s 5th Corps in the early days of the Iraq War. While the boldness of the mission plan and the teeth-clenching chaos it produced certainly provide a great storyline, the book seemed stuck in “preheat” a little too long before things started to cook. The factors surrounding this particular mission are most compelling: Super-elite British SAS/SBS forces (which included a smattering of Americans) driving open-top Land Rovers over 1,000 miles into Iraq to force/urge an enemy fighting force of 100,000 to surrender. The almost absurd risk of the mission earned the nickname “Operation No Return” before it even started. Despite the raiding force’s superior technology, weaponry and skills, the uncertainty of how the Iraqi’s will react to the surrender request would dictate not only success or failure, but life or death for the British operators. Basically, the mission added up to driving 1000 miles into enemy territory just to kick a hornet’s nest and see how it reacts. This book certainly has the ingredients for a nail-biting thriller, but it falls a little short of being great in the sense that it dragged on a little too long (roughly 2/3s of the book) before the real action starts popping. Another issue is that Lewis opted to focus on one unit’s experience of the mission (M Squadron) as opposed to an overall view. In other words, we’re only getting part of the story. There are some instances where the narrow perspective of one unit’s predicament leaves readers guessing at what other units in the group are doing in critical moments … Lewis simply details one of several finely-tuned cogs in the well-oiled 60-man machine and it isn’t even the commanding cog. When the entire force runs into the enemy and everything goes awry, the narrow scope Lewis presents hints at other units in the group acting less-competently (getting mired in river bed and failing to prevent the enemy from obtaining sensitive/classified equipment). While this surely may be unintentional, it comes across that way at times. When the British force is ambushed before reaching their objective, the action starts ratcheting up exponentially. The combat described in the book is more “cat and mouse” with the SAS/SBS men (the mice) driving around the desert at night trying to avoid a hunting party that appears to include tanks from the Iraqi 5th Corps and diehard Saddam loyalists (Fedayeen) zipping around in Toyota’s with heavy machine guns mounted to them (the cats). The sense of desperation and frustration are clearly outlined as the group finds itself surrounded with avenue of escape and not enough ammunition or manpower to fight its way out of the predicament. The last 1/3rd of the book is action-packed and exciting; it just took a little too long to get there. While I was a little disappointed in Lewis’ presentation, ZERO SIX BRAVO was a worthy read in that it sheds light on how elite soldiers respond so well when the stuff hits the fan. Bad intelligence resulted in 60 men facing certain death, but these men innately found ways to handle everything thrown at them (in the dark, no less) … amazing. I certainly wouldn’t mind seeing a screen-adaptation of the story. One thing I do find mind-boggling: that of the book being written in part to offset these SAS/SBS being labeled as “cowards” for refusing to die or be captured (they fought their way out of a disaster). You seriously have to wonder what special-kind of idiot would seriously label any Special Forces soldier as “cowardly”. If anything, the book certainly dispels that ridiculous notion.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    A very, very good story, though I wish it weren't told for dummies as in: "if an extra guy is on the vehicle, the gunner cannot use the gun... 'Am I in the way of your gun'? the extra guy says and the gunner cannot use the gun no matter what he does... So the gunner could not use his gun" If only the author and the editor had been brave enough to cut down the story with a third.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mariusz

    A truly excellent, fast-paced book telling the story of an unsuccessful foray of SBS’s M Squadron into Northern Iraq during the 2003 campaign. Based on flawed intelligence, the 60-strong squadron was inserted deep behind the enemy lines to receive capitulation of Iraqi 5th Army Corps, said to be willing to contemplate surrender, prior to the commencement of the ground campaign. As the soldiers very soon found out, the 5th Army Corps was not in any way intending to surrender, and the squadron fou A truly excellent, fast-paced book telling the story of an unsuccessful foray of SBS’s M Squadron into Northern Iraq during the 2003 campaign. Based on flawed intelligence, the 60-strong squadron was inserted deep behind the enemy lines to receive capitulation of Iraqi 5th Army Corps, said to be willing to contemplate surrender, prior to the commencement of the ground campaign. As the soldiers very soon found out, the 5th Army Corps was not in any way intending to surrender, and the squadron found itself battling a combined force of the 5th Corps and the Fedayeen militia. For a week the squadron managed to advance north undetected. After being spotted by a goat shepherd, it waged an initial battle on the numerically superior Iraqi force, and, after Iraqi armour moved into action, it went into an escape and evasion mode. Faced by such an overwhelming force, it is remarkable that the squadron managed to avoid any fatal casualties and, with the exception of two of its members, who escaped to Syria and were held captive there for three weeks, managed to extract safely in three groups. Although much better equipped (clothing and weapons) and mobile (Land Rover “Pinkies” and quads) than the famous SAS’s Bravo Two Zero patrol from more than a decade earlier, it faced many of the latter’s circumstances: poor intelligence data, minimal planning, very limited air support - only two Chinook helicopters available (which meant that the squadron had to insert over three consecutive nights, increasing the risk of detection and contributing to tiredness of the soldiers who slept very little over a period of 7 days, and had to abandon its vehicles, when airlifted) and no top cover from attack aircraft for most of the squadron’s mission, not to mention being spotted by a goat shepherd. Only the superior training and battle experience of the soldiers allowed the satisfactory outcome. The unfair part, which presumably led to the writing of the book, was that the force was heavily criticised by the media and commentators for running away from the enemy and abandoning their equipment (some of the explosive charges placed in the Pinkies and quads failed to ignite, leading to these vehicles being paraded by the Iraqis). Upon reading the book, and assuming that the account there contained is true, one realises how unfair such statements may have been. Having just read another UK special forces book (“SAS Operation Storm”), I found the literary style of “Zero Six Bravo” much more interesting. Overall, therefore, a great book to read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    William

    Being a reader of military history and fiction, this book is over the top. Quite possibly one of the best I have read this year. It is the story of British SAS behind enemy lines during the Iraqi War. The trials that these 60 soldiers went thru is beyond belief. It is a MUST READ for military lovers. Even though this is factual account, let me explain the book like this: you can read the great naval fiction where a British ship is under fire by two French frigates (the mundane books), or you have Being a reader of military history and fiction, this book is over the top. Quite possibly one of the best I have read this year. It is the story of British SAS behind enemy lines during the Iraqi War. The trials that these 60 soldiers went thru is beyond belief. It is a MUST READ for military lovers. Even though this is factual account, let me explain the book like this: you can read the great naval fiction where a British ship is under fire by two French frigates (the mundane books), or you have the authors that write about having a British frigate where 1/3 of the crew are mutinous, 1/2 the crew have yellow fever and the ship is being chased by two French frigates, oh and yes- the mizzen mast just got shot off. This book describes the latter one, except it is in real life. I believe this is the 2014 version of the 2004 original version. I think the 2004 book may have been titled: Operation Certain Death.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Zero Six Bravo by Damien Lewis was about the story of British and Allied soldiers fighting a war in Iraq. This story shows the struggle and how intense it was to survive the attacks of the Iraqi Army. They were out numbered and in unfamiliar terrain, they shouldn’t have survived. I rate this book 3 stars because the first 100 pages were really hard to get through. It was full of a lot of boring detail and background information that personally I did not care about. I recommend this book to peopl Zero Six Bravo by Damien Lewis was about the story of British and Allied soldiers fighting a war in Iraq. This story shows the struggle and how intense it was to survive the attacks of the Iraqi Army. They were out numbered and in unfamiliar terrain, they shouldn’t have survived. I rate this book 3 stars because the first 100 pages were really hard to get through. It was full of a lot of boring detail and background information that personally I did not care about. I recommend this book to people who like war and can take gruesome images created by the author. This book is action packed and the author does a great job with imagery on the battlefield.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Howard H

    I'm going to pause before I finish this book to share my disappointment. Tales of courage, of men who dare to battle the odds and the enemy were made for me. I may not finish this one anyway. Two-thirds of the way through, and I've reached the conclusion this story is just too thin to to see - or in this case to read on. Most of this book amounts to the risks of driving overland, especially in the dark. Got it; it's perilous with boulders and bogs plus the enemy out there. But page after page? I' I'm going to pause before I finish this book to share my disappointment. Tales of courage, of men who dare to battle the odds and the enemy were made for me. I may not finish this one anyway. Two-thirds of the way through, and I've reached the conclusion this story is just too thin to to see - or in this case to read on. Most of this book amounts to the risks of driving overland, especially in the dark. Got it; it's perilous with boulders and bogs plus the enemy out there. But page after page? I'm ready for something else. HH

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Andrews

    Damien's works are addictive, im yet to read one of his books that didn't really draw you in. He delivers tension & suspense in such a masterful way. Really enjoyed this book, the story is extremely captivating. Only thing which is unusual for Damien, is that its told entirely from one perspective. I can see why it may have only been possible to do it this way, but there are certain elements of the story which would have benefited from more than one perspective. Nonetheless a very enjoyable read Damien's works are addictive, im yet to read one of his books that didn't really draw you in. He delivers tension & suspense in such a masterful way. Really enjoyed this book, the story is extremely captivating. Only thing which is unusual for Damien, is that its told entirely from one perspective. I can see why it may have only been possible to do it this way, but there are certain elements of the story which would have benefited from more than one perspective. Nonetheless a very enjoyable read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    David McFarlane

    This is a inspiring book, which brings you into the minds of those select few who fight for our freedoms. It is also inspiring in terms of honour, duty and fortitude. As is so often the case, the British expect so much from so few, and in this unit they got it; it is such a pity that the media responded the way they did without knowing the facts, as this caused so much heartache to so many in the unit and their families. READ AND BE INSPIRED!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter T

    Damien Lewis had access to the men from this mission - and the contents has been vetted by the British military. It's hard to believe you are reading a non-fiction book. Written in an engaging style, I found it hard to put down. A fascinating insight into the tenaciousness and resourcefulness of the British Special Forces.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    An exciting read about Zero Six Bravo, a mission in Iraq in Gulf War II. The story tells of how the team were compromised in a way not too dissimilar to Bravo Two Zero in Gulf War I, and how they had to escape and evade the Iraqi army and Fedayeen. It's well written and is exciting in that you can at times feel you're there with the soldiers, literally shitting bricks.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Fletcher

    When they say explosive they aren't kidding. Once they get deployed in Iraq the book becomes impossible to put down. I read this book in 2 days it as an incredible read and amazed at their survival. Damien Lewis writes an amazing piece of history. Highly recommend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John brown

    ps Good read , gripping story , these lads should he treated as hero's and given due respect , its a pity some one can't come up with a way to stop the dust clouds forming when they are on such ops ?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Richardson

    This is one of those books that will frustrate you with what our government demands from our armed services. It's a book about pure British military stupidity and it's not a bad book but it's just nowhere near as good as his SAS Nazi Hunter book which is one of my favourite books of all time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Rose

    I don't give many five star ratings. This definitely deserves it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Hughes

    Worth a read

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mat Wheatley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. SAS being secret slippery gypsies in Iraq (novelized)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gordy Feenstra

    Took me by the balls and kept me going till the end!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Keegan

    Amazing SAS story - almost didnt believe it really happened

  22. 4 out of 5

    Drew Ames

    It looks like this will be the first review of this book on Goodreads. This is a well-told story about a secret British special forces mission coinciding with the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Their mission was to take 60 men deep into northern Iraq and accept the surrender of an entire Iraqi army corps that British/Coalition intelligence felt were hostile to Saddam Hussein. The author tells the story in a straightforward manner, largely following one particular special forces soldier, but filling in a It looks like this will be the first review of this book on Goodreads. This is a well-told story about a secret British special forces mission coinciding with the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Their mission was to take 60 men deep into northern Iraq and accept the surrender of an entire Iraqi army corps that British/Coalition intelligence felt were hostile to Saddam Hussein. The author tells the story in a straightforward manner, largely following one particular special forces soldier, but filling in additional details of the action when necessary. The first half of the book introduces the special forces unit, covers their training and equipment, their mission prep, and the first couple uneventful days of their mission. Then, at about the halfway point of the book, Iraqi forces ambush the British and what follows is an intense seven plus-hour running fight between the lightly armed and unarmored British force in Land Rovers and quad bikes and heavily armed Iraqi forces backed by tanks. I don't want to spoil the ending, but the end result was pretty amazing. There are a few quibbles I have with the book that prevent a five-star rating. There were times that I suspected that the story's perspective, primarily following one soldier, was a narrative device. The author states that he interviewed a number of the participants and changed all the names. Nevertheless, there were times while reading that I started to wonder if one person and his team on one Land Rover was really in the thick of the action the entire mission. There were also some minor potential errors such as stating that the soldiers' personal long arms were 7.62 caliber, where I'm pretty certain they were 5.56 caliber, or describing a 50 caliber machine gun as spitting out bullets the diameter of a child's wrist, which is a slight exaggeration. None of these issues detracted from my enjoyment of the story or, significantly, from its truth. This story aligns very well with other accounts of the mission I've found after some brief research. This book is focused on the story of the mission. There is very little editorializing and no substantial discussion of the intelligence that led to the mission or how it happened to be so terribly mistaken. This is simply a well-written, tense, and interesting war story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Kemp

    I make a point of reading first hand accounts, although these days I don't expect much from tales of recent events. This particular book suffers a bit from excessive hypebole. However it is actually very readable, and although much of the outcome is telepgrahed in advance the way it's done is through a good hook to keep you reading to find out the detail of how/what happens. You know when you start to read it that the mission isn't going to go well. In fact without even knowing anything about it I make a point of reading first hand accounts, although these days I don't expect much from tales of recent events. This particular book suffers a bit from excessive hypebole. However it is actually very readable, and although much of the outcome is telepgrahed in advance the way it's done is through a good hook to keep you reading to find out the detail of how/what happens. You know when you start to read it that the mission isn't going to go well. In fact without even knowing anything about it I picked up that it must have gone horribly wrong. However I also knew that it couldn't have gone that far wrong, because otherwise I probably would have heard about it since I have an interest in current affairs and military operations. The story follows the perspective of one SBS Sergeant who was the lead navigator for most of the mission. Mainly it focusses on what he sees, and the actions of his three man vehicle crew. On the whole it is an interesting narrative and it gripped me enough to read longer than I normally do. There's a clear thread running through it of the forebodings, that may well have been how the central character felt, but are laboured to the extent that it comes across as 20:20 hindsight. There are also some rather strained references to Bravo Two Zero and the similarities with that patrol (both seem to have been compromised because they refused to shoot a child goat herder). That doesn't really wash with me because the goat incident in Bravo Two Zero wasn't repeated in the other books about the patrol and The Real "Bravo Two Zero" gives another version of events (apparently two Iraqui veterans of the Iran-Iraq War spotted the patrol, not a child goat herder). Despite this I still think it's worth a read, especially if you get it for the knock down price of 99p as I did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cropredy

    This book is what I would call SAS-lit, like chick-lit for guys except instead of romance and BFFs, you get a healthy dose of Pinkies and Gimpies, manned by tough operators with names like Scruff and Dude. The story is quite exciting and fortunately there is little time spent on the soldier's years of training or personal lives. Let's just say that things get (really) harrowing. One thing this is not is military history, told by a dispassionate scholar. Instead, it is the story of a behind the s This book is what I would call SAS-lit, like chick-lit for guys except instead of romance and BFFs, you get a healthy dose of Pinkies and Gimpies, manned by tough operators with names like Scruff and Dude. The story is quite exciting and fortunately there is little time spent on the soldier's years of training or personal lives. Let's just say that things get (really) harrowing. One thing this is not is military history, told by a dispassionate scholar. Instead, it is the story of a behind the scenes Iraq mission of 60 British SBS and SAS on Land Rovers (the Pinkies) and quadrcycles. The mission was launched just before the 2003 invasion and is told through the eyes and mind of one Pinkie leader. I suspect the protagonist was the author's only source, as spec ops members don't talk to authors as a general rule. If you enjoy this kind of stuff, check out 'Pathfinder' by Blakely for an equally amazing story that took place on the other side of Iraq.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vivek Agarwal

    This is a brilliant book If what they say is a true account of their battle in Iraq, This team of elite forces has seen hell and managed to survive, The leadership skills of the team leader Grey is excellent, he was leading the team and guiding them to their LZ and making decisions which allowed them to stay alive, Even though they were elite forces, they were outnumbered and yet they used their survival and fighting and thinking skills, and worked as a team to evade capture as well as to fight This is a brilliant book If what they say is a true account of their battle in Iraq, This team of elite forces has seen hell and managed to survive, The leadership skills of the team leader Grey is excellent, he was leading the team and guiding them to their LZ and making decisions which allowed them to stay alive, Even though they were elite forces, they were outnumbered and yet they used their survival and fighting and thinking skills, and worked as a team to evade capture as well as to fight Their mission went from capturing 100,000 Iraqi soldiers to survival and escaping form these same troops who were ready to surrender, I loved this book, it is scary, and I can only commend and imagine the hardship of each and every person on that elite team If in my next lifetime I have a chance to be as brave as them, or to learn this art of warfare, I will sign up immediately A MUST READ!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Jones

    This book is the true story of an episode just prior to the start of the land offensive in the Second Gulf War of 2003 and tells the story of 60 Special Forces soldiers who were sent, on the back of what turned out to be false intelligence, to take the surrender of the Iraqi 5th Army based in the north of the country. Officers from this Army had previously tried to overthrow Saddam and Allied intelligence services thought they were willing to surrender without a fight. This turned out to be far This book is the true story of an episode just prior to the start of the land offensive in the Second Gulf War of 2003 and tells the story of 60 Special Forces soldiers who were sent, on the back of what turned out to be false intelligence, to take the surrender of the Iraqi 5th Army based in the north of the country. Officers from this Army had previously tried to overthrow Saddam and Allied intelligence services thought they were willing to surrender without a fight. This turned out to be far from the truth and this is the story of how those 60 men were pursued across hostile and inhospitable Iraqi terrain by over 100 000 men. This is not the type of book I would normally read but I thoroughly enjoyed it and may well look out for other books by this author.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Morgan

    Couldn't put the book down, read from cover to cover in as much of my spare time as possible. This is a true story, an account of special forces in Iraq prior to ground invasion (Air superiority already gained by NATO forces over Iraq). Inserted 100's of kilometers behind enemy lines with the brief of taking surrender of the Iraq, 5th Army, based on incorrect intelligence that they were ready to surrender, this was not the case and UKSF cad to evade Iraq Forces with heavy armour until they were a Couldn't put the book down, read from cover to cover in as much of my spare time as possible. This is a true story, an account of special forces in Iraq prior to ground invasion (Air superiority already gained by NATO forces over Iraq). Inserted 100's of kilometers behind enemy lines with the brief of taking surrender of the Iraq, 5th Army, based on incorrect intelligence that they were ready to surrender, this was not the case and UKSF cad to evade Iraq Forces with heavy armour until they were able to be picked up by helicopter under fire. A truly amazing read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John

    Looks like a good read ... 60 special forces... 100.000 enemy ...an explosive true story. Game on A good read of a book by someone who experienced the events first hand. It would appear that intelligence at the time of the Iraq war was flawed from day one. Despite that, our lads, a combination of SAS and SBS did thier duty as we would expect them to do in such dire circumstances. No wonder we have the very best operators in the world. A recomended book for anyone to read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Raftery

    This is not my kind of book l don't read non fiction at all l am someone who likes Ben Kane Harry Sidebttom or Bernard Cornwell.,but this not that long ago only 14 years .On how 60 men from britsh special forces took on 100,000 Iraqis who they were told had no fight in them how wrong they were. It shows how well these men can work as a team to fight side by side and how trapped behind enemy lines vehicles bogged in swamps they don't give up always on the move. Great true story

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    This book details a Special Forces operation that ran into serious problems. I thought this book was quite interesting but I found it difficult to engage with the writing, as it was repetitive and the narrative was bogged down by constant (repeated) details of military hardware. If this book had been harshly edited it could have been gripping. However this book did highlight how without proper intelligence military actions can quickly become simple fights for survival.

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