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The Road to Afghanistan

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In moving words, a soldier home from a tour of duty in Afghanistan recalls its scenery and its people; the challenges faces and the successes achieved; the sense of duty and commitment...and the cost of that commitment. Coupled with striking and evocative images of Afghanistan and other lands where Canadian soldiers have served through the years, this story honours those w In moving words, a soldier home from a tour of duty in Afghanistan recalls its scenery and its people; the challenges faces and the successes achieved; the sense of duty and commitment...and the cost of that commitment. Coupled with striking and evocative images of Afghanistan and other lands where Canadian soldiers have served through the years, this story honours those who have put their own lives on the line in a country far from home.


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In moving words, a soldier home from a tour of duty in Afghanistan recalls its scenery and its people; the challenges faces and the successes achieved; the sense of duty and commitment...and the cost of that commitment. Coupled with striking and evocative images of Afghanistan and other lands where Canadian soldiers have served through the years, this story honours those w In moving words, a soldier home from a tour of duty in Afghanistan recalls its scenery and its people; the challenges faces and the successes achieved; the sense of duty and commitment...and the cost of that commitment. Coupled with striking and evocative images of Afghanistan and other lands where Canadian soldiers have served through the years, this story honours those who have put their own lives on the line in a country far from home.

30 review for The Road to Afghanistan

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natasja

    My 4-year-old brought this home from school and I kind of groaned because I didn't know if I wanted to read a war book to him. But I did and I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised! I liked that the narrator drew similarities between stories she'd heard of her great-grandfather in WWI to the things she'd lived in Afghanistan. She also vaguely mentioned instances of things that had happened that left it open for you to discuss with your kid - like, she never outright said she lost her arm, but My 4-year-old brought this home from school and I kind of groaned because I didn't know if I wanted to read a war book to him. But I did and I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised! I liked that the narrator drew similarities between stories she'd heard of her great-grandfather in WWI to the things she'd lived in Afghanistan. She also vaguely mentioned instances of things that had happened that left it open for you to discuss with your kid - like, she never outright said she lost her arm, but you could see it on the last page so it's something I could have chosen to not have to talk about with my son (though I did). I also liked that the book wasn't preachy. It wasn't about who was right or wrong in the war, but rather about the realities of the soldiers living throught it. All in all, I was glad I read this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Polly

    If I were in the habit of doing Rememberence Day library programs for school-age kids, this is a book I would use. It doesn't push the rightness or wrongness of war, simply reflects on being a Canadian soldier now and in the wars and missions of the 20th century, and tries to connect those far off (to a child) dates with real faces and places and names. It also does its bit for gender equality. If I were in the habit of doing Rememberence Day library programs for school-age kids, this is a book I would use. It doesn't push the rightness or wrongness of war, simply reflects on being a Canadian soldier now and in the wars and missions of the 20th century, and tries to connect those far off (to a child) dates with real faces and places and names. It also does its bit for gender equality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barbra

    A young Alberta boy tells this soldier’s story. First of his grandfather, who lost his arm in the Great War, and then of his own experiences in Afghanistan. It honors our Canadian soldiers who have served through the years. This is a must-have for schools, and children’s libraries and is suitable for ages seven to adult.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peyton

    “The Road to Afghanistan” is a picture book written by Linda Granfield, a veteran who completed four tours in Afghanistan. She writes about real experiences and real people. I appreciate how Granfield is able to bring such a difficult issue, as Afghanistan is, into the awareness of children. Afghanistan is a political, moral, and trying issue. The content of discussion often recalls moments of violent, distress, and difficulties. Granfield was able to bring all these issues to the forefront, whi “The Road to Afghanistan” is a picture book written by Linda Granfield, a veteran who completed four tours in Afghanistan. She writes about real experiences and real people. I appreciate how Granfield is able to bring such a difficult issue, as Afghanistan is, into the awareness of children. Afghanistan is a political, moral, and trying issue. The content of discussion often recalls moments of violent, distress, and difficulties. Granfield was able to bring all these issues to the forefront, while still making it accessible to children. She does not go into great detail, but instead provides a start for children to learn more about important issues.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Canadian Reader

    I was expecting a lot more from this picture book for older children. It is the story of a modern-day Canadian Forces soldier injured in Afghanistan by an IED. The actual identity of the soldier and the nature of the injury are not revealed until the end. This is a surprise and one of the book's positive features. The Road to Afghanistan is also the story of soldiering in the generations of one Canadian family. The narrator's great-grandfather, a farm-boy from Alberta, went off to the Great War, I was expecting a lot more from this picture book for older children. It is the story of a modern-day Canadian Forces soldier injured in Afghanistan by an IED. The actual identity of the soldier and the nature of the injury are not revealed until the end. This is a surprise and one of the book's positive features. The Road to Afghanistan is also the story of soldiering in the generations of one Canadian family. The narrator's great-grandfather, a farm-boy from Alberta, went off to the Great War, a grandfather fought the good fight in the least morally ambiguous of recent wars: World War II, and now the soldier has returned from Afghanistan, forced by injury to take a new road in life. Don't get me wrong: the bare bones of a good story are here. However, the author skirts around a modern day soldier's motivations for joining the military at all. The soldier/narrator says that the reasons for enlisting are "a story in themselves"--a tantalizing, but unsatisfactory aside to the reader. From what a number of military people have told me, it seems that many join when young and at loose ends. Wouldn't it have been interesting if Granfield had explored an idea like this with kids?! Instead we have yet another story of a sacrifice made--and for what? I can't help reading any war-themed book for children (or adults for that matter) without thinking of eminent Jungian psychologist James Hillman's remark "Ah war...how we love it." It just wouldn't go on if we didn't love it. In his book A Terrible Love of War, Hillman describes how war provides people with a sense of moral clarity and purpose--a sense of the heroic. Until something else can fill that psychological need, I suspect it'll just go on and on. The Road to Afghanistan could have been a good deal better if the author had had the courage to reveal something of the young soldier's (possibly confused reasons) for joining up. Having said all of this, this book might be a good discussion starter in a Canadian upper elementary classroom. No doubt it will be read in all kinds of Canadian classrooms right before Remembrance Day. And so it goes. I should add that I'm a big admirer of Granfield's other nonfiction works on Canada's role in the big wars of the last century. I feel, however, that she missed the mark here. I hope she tries another fiction piece for kids that will actually address some of the thornier issues.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I struggle with stories like "The Road to Afghanistan", not because the story is not well-told, it is and the illustrations are striking, but because I am troubled by the increasing focus in Canada on the importance of the military. While I believe Canadian soldiers are good people who enter the Forces with good intentions and that the need for stability in Afghanistan is an ongoing one, I am leery of casting ourselves in the role of heroes. Casting ourselves as heroes means casting others as vi I struggle with stories like "The Road to Afghanistan", not because the story is not well-told, it is and the illustrations are striking, but because I am troubled by the increasing focus in Canada on the importance of the military. While I believe Canadian soldiers are good people who enter the Forces with good intentions and that the need for stability in Afghanistan is an ongoing one, I am leery of casting ourselves in the role of heroes. Casting ourselves as heroes means casting others as villains. Still this book gives opportunity for discussion of heroes, villains and the role of the military, as well as the incredible cost of military action.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Read this book to students from grade 1-7. This story presents a contemporary soldier's perspective on the soldiers in their family's past and how that relates to their own experience. There is a clever twist near the end of the story that challenges the reader's preconceptions about who a soldier is. Read this book to students from grade 1-7. This story presents a contemporary soldier's perspective on the soldiers in their family's past and how that relates to their own experience. There is a clever twist near the end of the story that challenges the reader's preconceptions about who a soldier is.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    A powerful and poignant remembrance for anyone from age 7 and up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Flanders

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karyn Huenemann

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jo-Ann

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily Collins

  15. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  16. 5 out of 5

    *Tidi*

  17. 4 out of 5

    Samia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura5

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

  20. 4 out of 5

    DickensAnnex

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tahreem

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Veilleux

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ridita Lyudmila

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lucy June Whitefords

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emjs Librarian

  27. 4 out of 5

    Metthea Maddern

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Earle

  29. 4 out of 5

    paula

  30. 4 out of 5

    Parth

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