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American Vampire, Vol. 6

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You are cordially invited to a party--to die for! This volume of American Vampire collects eight amazing stories set in the world of American Vampire, with "lost tales," new characters and old favorites. Don't miss these stories brought to you by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque, as well as other awesome comics talent like Becky Cloonan (Batman), Gabriel You are cordially invited to a party--to die for! This volume of American Vampire collects eight amazing stories set in the world of American Vampire, with "lost tales," new characters and old favorites. Don't miss these stories brought to you by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque, as well as other awesome comics talent like Becky Cloonan (Batman), Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon (Daytripper), Jeff Lemire (i>Sweet Tooth), Greg Rucka (The Punisher, Batwoman), Gail Simone (Batgirl) and many more! Also collected here is the stand alone tale of Fan-favorite character Travis Kidd--the vampire hunter who likes to "bite them back". Collecting: American Vampire Anthology, The Long Road to Hell


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You are cordially invited to a party--to die for! This volume of American Vampire collects eight amazing stories set in the world of American Vampire, with "lost tales," new characters and old favorites. Don't miss these stories brought to you by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque, as well as other awesome comics talent like Becky Cloonan (Batman), Gabriel You are cordially invited to a party--to die for! This volume of American Vampire collects eight amazing stories set in the world of American Vampire, with "lost tales," new characters and old favorites. Don't miss these stories brought to you by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque, as well as other awesome comics talent like Becky Cloonan (Batman), Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon (Daytripper), Jeff Lemire (i>Sweet Tooth), Greg Rucka (The Punisher, Batwoman), Gail Simone (Batgirl) and many more! Also collected here is the stand alone tale of Fan-favorite character Travis Kidd--the vampire hunter who likes to "bite them back". Collecting: American Vampire Anthology, The Long Road to Hell

30 review for American Vampire, Vol. 6

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Volume 6 of American Vampire is a collection of individual short narratives that add to the vampire mythos already established by Scott Snyder, many of which focus on Skinner Sweet, the first American vampire. There are several big names in comics here, both writers and artists, all taking a turn at playing in Snyder's sandbox. Overall, it's an uneven effort, both in terms of art and narrative. The stories skip around in time and location, offering a sweeping history of vampires in North America, Volume 6 of American Vampire is a collection of individual short narratives that add to the vampire mythos already established by Scott Snyder, many of which focus on Skinner Sweet, the first American vampire. There are several big names in comics here, both writers and artists, all taking a turn at playing in Snyder's sandbox. Overall, it's an uneven effort, both in terms of art and narrative. The stories skip around in time and location, offering a sweeping history of vampires in North America, both before and after Skinner Sweet. Jason Aaron, Gail Simone, and Jeff Lemire offer the best stories here--especially Simone's take on Hattie Hargrove's revenge on the powerful Hollywood men who used the desire for fame and fortune against wannabe-starlets. The least successful story is penned by none other than Rafael Albuquerque, which feels underdeveloped and cliched. Despite the weakness of the story he contributes, there's no denying Albuquerque's artistic talents. He is one of the reasons American Vampire has been so successful as his artistic style perfectly captures the brutality and violence of Snyder's narratives, and is every bit as integral to the storytelling and world created here. If nothing else, this collection solidifies the fact that the real success of American Vampire lies in the collaboration between Snyder and Albuquerque. While some of these stories are entertaining, one could certainly give them a pass as they do nothing to advance the main plot points forward. The collection also includes the one-shot The Long Road to Hell, a longer and more successful story written by Snyder and illustrated by Albuquerque that reminds you why American Vampire kicks so much ass.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Char

    3.5/5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Think of this as a break in the regular storyline. It's a short story collection, really, with different characters and time periods in each. For the most part, they were quite good. But I do admit being let down when I realized that this volume wasn't going to advance the main story at all.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A hodge podge of tales over the decades from the 1950s and before focusing on the American Vampire tales. Some are interesting and some not so much. OVERALL GRADE: B minus.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    Worst art of the series. Snippets about Skinner Sweet and Travis Kidd that don’t expand on the characters. Completely random vampire stories with weak art. There was an interesting Hattie Hargrove backstory, but not enough to have paid money for this. Thank you Library. Worst art of the series. Snippets about Skinner Sweet and Travis Kidd that don’t expand on the characters. Completely random vampire stories with weak art. There was an interesting Hattie Hargrove backstory, but not enough to have paid money for this. Thank you Library.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    3,5 stars The problem with anthologies is always the same: a few stories are good, some are ok, lots of them you are not going to like at all. The long road to hell is the longest and the best one (4/5 stars), the one about the lost colony is very good and a few more, then quality goes downfall.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This was an anthology of short stories that fleshed out some details in the American Vampire mythos. The first story, "The Long Road to Hell", was very good, but the volume went downhill fast after that. Not something I'd really recommend, except for completists.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    This week's theme for the Shallow Comic Readers is, well, pot luck! A rather weak collection of American Vampire stories. This first tale is American Vampire: Long Road to Hell, by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque. The best of the book, it's about a thieving young couple and their fight against the ones who turned them into vampires. At times poignant and clever, it's a decent enough tale that doesn't seem too out of place with the rest of the series. Then second half of the boo This week's theme for the Shallow Comic Readers is, well, pot luck! A rather weak collection of American Vampire stories. This first tale is American Vampire: Long Road to Hell, by series creators Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque. The best of the book, it's about a thieving young couple and their fight against the ones who turned them into vampires. At times poignant and clever, it's a decent enough tale that doesn't seem too out of place with the rest of the series. Then second half of the book is from the Vampire Anthology issues, and has a number of stories by some rather big names in the business. Jeff Lemire, Gail Simone, Greg Rucka, Jason Aaron, Declan Shalvey, Becky Cloonan, Francisco Francavilla, and more. Being short stories, they don't allow much room for characterization and most fall into cliched stories with predictable endings. Most of then really don't make a lot of sense, to be honest. Francavilla's and Cloonan's stories are perhaps the most perfect, but then they are artist/writers who do pretty well at capturing a good story in a few pages. The art by Ray Fawkes was the surprise of the book; I knew him only as a writer, but he's a pretty good artist with a nice style. Would love to see more of his artistic work. Even the Snyder/Albuquerque contribution to this anthology was lame. American Vampire, Vol 6 really doesn't move the series forward very much, if at all. It's not a good start for readers wanting to jump on board, regardless of what the back cover blurb says. Nevertheless, if you've read the previous five volumes and enjoyed them (like I did), then it's worth the hour's time to read through it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This was a collection of short mostly prequel stories as well as one feature length tale. I enjoyed all of the stories in this collection. The Long Road to Hell, which was the feature length story, was a very human tale of a Vampire Bonnie and Clyde, although this couple was a lot nicer even as vampires. This was a touching story, emotional in a way I was surprised to see in a vampire horror comics. The short stories ranged from around 1588 to 1940 and showed the pasts of some characters we know This was a collection of short mostly prequel stories as well as one feature length tale. I enjoyed all of the stories in this collection. The Long Road to Hell, which was the feature length story, was a very human tale of a Vampire Bonnie and Clyde, although this couple was a lot nicer even as vampires. This was a touching story, emotional in a way I was surprised to see in a vampire horror comics. The short stories ranged from around 1588 to 1940 and showed the pasts of some characters we know and a few new ones as well. For me this was a very well done anthology and a good way to fill in some blanks in the American Vampire universe. It was also cool to see a few different artists try their hand on the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TheVampireBookworm

    This is a reread and I think I've finally discovered the issue in which the American Vampire started to be weird and go downhill. It's a super thin issue with almost nonexistent Skinner Sweet plotline but boy are there many other non-relevant stories! The thing is, I hated those stories when I was reading it for the first time because I hated the different drawing styles. Second time around I quite appreciate them because they reflect the variety of speakers who were telling them. But it won't s This is a reread and I think I've finally discovered the issue in which the American Vampire started to be weird and go downhill. It's a super thin issue with almost nonexistent Skinner Sweet plotline but boy are there many other non-relevant stories! The thing is, I hated those stories when I was reading it for the first time because I hated the different drawing styles. Second time around I quite appreciate them because they reflect the variety of speakers who were telling them. But it won't save the main story which the creators probably couldn't make up at the time and that's why they took a detour.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    This one kind of had the feel of a clip show with one longer story followed by a whole bunch of quickies. Not the best of the bunch, though I did like the first one with the greaser and the kid.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shāfiya Mū

    Didn’t really care for the short stories. Would’ve preferred a continuation of the normal narrative.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    A little bit of filler, but interesting filler...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam M

    This isn't a terrible comic, but it also felt like filler. The next volume is really supposed to start the next "Chapter" in the saga of American Vampire, so this feels like tales Snyder wanted to tell before moving on. It's fine. Not super inspiring, but also not a wasted read. The series is losing a little momentum for me, so Vol 7 will be interesting to pick up after this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    colleen the convivial curmudgeon

    2.5 I almost bumped this up the 3-stars on the strength of the first story, which I quite liked, even though it doesn't - as of yet - seem to tie into the larger story. I liked the couple that was introduced, and I'm curious about the kid and wonder what will become of him. (view spoiler)[I was bummed that the couple died at the end, though, as I was hoping they'd become part of the larger story. (hide spoiler)] The other stories were kinda meh, though. Some were interesting enough, but were prett 2.5 I almost bumped this up the 3-stars on the strength of the first story, which I quite liked, even though it doesn't - as of yet - seem to tie into the larger story. I liked the couple that was introduced, and I'm curious about the kid and wonder what will become of him. (view spoiler)[I was bummed that the couple died at the end, though, as I was hoping they'd become part of the larger story. (hide spoiler)] The other stories were kinda meh, though. Some were interesting enough, but were pretty thin, overall, and I really didn't like the watercolor art of the one or two Western stories. One thing I said to my husband was that one thing I'll have to do, once the series is over, is reread it all back-to-back so I can get a firmer grasp on where things fall in the timeline. I'm not good at remembering all the details from book to book, and all the time-jumping doesn't really help in that regard.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Not the strongest volume of the series and definately not the weakest. The first cycle ended with vol. 5 and on #6 we have a solid story (The Long Road to Hell) by Albuquerque and Snyder and the first of two american vampire anthologies with 7-8 stories by different creators & artists. It's enjoyable if you have in mind the thing that always happens when you have collected works on the same title by different people. Differences in quality from story to story and the unavoidable comparison to th Not the strongest volume of the series and definately not the weakest. The first cycle ended with vol. 5 and on #6 we have a solid story (The Long Road to Hell) by Albuquerque and Snyder and the first of two american vampire anthologies with 7-8 stories by different creators & artists. It's enjoyable if you have in mind the thing that always happens when you have collected works on the same title by different people. Differences in quality from story to story and the unavoidable comparison to the original. Luckily, this phenomenon happens a few times here since the stories have high standards.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    It's been a while since I read American Vampire...or any graphic novels for that matter. Maybe tastes are changing. Either way, if one is to read graphic novels, this is the quality to look for. Both the art and the plot are very good, this one features a bunch ministories as well, the vampire Americana lore. Recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    These 8 tales and 1 stand alone just leave me wanting more. I really enjoyed the different styles of all of the participants. BTW who is that kid, and please give him some more page time?!? It was like snacking before a great meal.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    4.5 stars It was awesome to see Travis Kidd back. Most of the stories were really good. Some were pretty good, but I found the art for two stories unappealing. Hattie Hargrove's backstory was absolutely amazing. That's one of my favorite moments from this series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean Carlin

    A compilation of inconsequential "sidequels," mostly short stories by guest contributors, set within the American Vampire mythos. None of it moves the grander narrative forward or sheds any new light on previously depicted events (there may, in fact, even be a continuity error with respect to what inspired Skinner to head for Hollywood, ground already covered in "Strange Frontier"). From its inception, American Vampire has been a structurally nonlinear pastiche, but in Scott Snyder's hands, there A compilation of inconsequential "sidequels," mostly short stories by guest contributors, set within the American Vampire mythos. None of it moves the grander narrative forward or sheds any new light on previously depicted events (there may, in fact, even be a continuity error with respect to what inspired Skinner to head for Hollywood, ground already covered in "Strange Frontier"). From its inception, American Vampire has been a structurally nonlinear pastiche, but in Scott Snyder's hands, there was always a sense of method to the madness. This is the first entry in the series that feels extraneous, inessential, and otherwise disconnected from American Vampire's mythic narrative mosaic. Anthology no doubt started as a well-meaning creative experiment -- let other artists play in the AV sandbox -- but it turns out AV is better served as the singular vision of its creator. After bringing his sprawling saga full circle in American Vampire Vol. 5, this, alas, was a case of more being less. Unless you're a true AV diehard, skip it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Václav

    This book contains two parts. Short arc The Long Road to Hell, which I enjoyed very much because it is a nice fresh side story, about a couple of lovebirds becoming a super thirsty vampire, which is more curse for them than anything else. This is not essential to mainline, but it is very enjoyable. The second part is American Vampire Anthology #1. I had high hopes because of contributing authors. And I enjoyed almost all of them and my personal favourites are the ones form Becky Cloonan and from This book contains two parts. Short arc The Long Road to Hell, which I enjoyed very much because it is a nice fresh side story, about a couple of lovebirds becoming a super thirsty vampire, which is more curse for them than anything else. This is not essential to mainline, but it is very enjoyable. The second part is American Vampire Anthology #1. I had high hopes because of contributing authors. And I enjoyed almost all of them and my personal favourites are the ones form Becky Cloonan and from Bá & Moon. I also enjoyed the Lemire's one, but the art wasn't my thing and it was very... Lemire-ish. Altogether, this was a nice book, the short stories were fun but they all just stayed in the shadow of The Long Road to Hell.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    I like this volume even more than most. The first half lets artist Albuquerque script as well, to good effect. And the second half, an anthology, lets a whole bunch of great talent play in the American Vampire sandbox. Recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven M Long

    Nice, filled in some interesting back story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alondra Miller

    5 Stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric Mesa

    This originally appeared at: http://www.comicpow.com/2016/01/20/ca... -- go there to see images -- American Vampire has always been more about America than vampires. Because America has always been portrayed as a land of opportunity, it has always attracted those most desperate for that opportunity. That has often led to the exploitation of those least able to defend themselves. Yet, unlike many countries, throughout a good chunk of America’s history, it has been one of the easiest countries to mo This originally appeared at: http://www.comicpow.com/2016/01/20/ca... -- go there to see images -- American Vampire has always been more about America than vampires. Because America has always been portrayed as a land of opportunity, it has always attracted those most desperate for that opportunity. That has often led to the exploitation of those least able to defend themselves. Yet, unlike many countries, throughout a good chunk of America’s history, it has been one of the easiest countries to move up the social ladder. For some that meant running away from debts to start anew in America. For others, it was getting free, large tracts of land out west from the American government. From the industrial revolution forward, a good idea and a bit of luck could propel one to the highest heights. A great deal of fiction has explored what happens once someone catapults out of their poorer circumstances – sometimes up just one level and sometimes from poor to rich. Do they now treat their former peers with the same contempt they once received? Or do they remember where they came from and remain respectful of those in poorer circumstances? While other countries have had similar stories, it has a greater association with America. Sometimes it’s been truer than other times. But it’s this big theme that unites all the stories in the second half of American Vampire Vol 6, made up of American Vampire Anthology #1. Here Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque hand their universe over to some of my favorite writers, including Jason Aaron, Becky Cloonan, Francesco Francavilla, and Gail Simone. The stories take place all over American history from the time of the first European settlers to the 1960s. (And one takes place in Canada!) All of them but the story bookending the anthology, The Man Comes Around, involve those in power taking advantage of those with less power. A good chunk of the stories involve Hollywood. It’s no surprise that even the main series went from the wild west to Hollywood. There are fewer places in America in which the power dynamics are so imbalanced than in Hollywood. After all, while not just anyone can act, far more people can act than there are professional actors. It is the men who guard the money to produce movies that wield the power in determining whether or not a promising young man or woman becomes a star. Reality has many tales of those taken advantage of with promises of stardom. In the world of American Vampire, sometimes becoming a vampire means become a slave to yet another set of people with power over you. But it can also give you the physical power over others to allow for revenge. Plenty of both happens in these stories. It’s not often that stories have us rooting for the bad guys, but the story in which a vampire is marked to be sold into slavery on a ship – shanghaid – certainly had me hoping he would take revenge on those who sough to take advantage of his poor condition. Another powerful story used vampires as an analogy of the power vacuum that existed in the 1960s among African Americans. Even those who were famous entertainers often found themselves treated like garbage when not on stage. Of course, Snyder and his collaborators on this anthology are never anvilicious with the morals and the stories remain great, short romps. It’s also fun to see the comic short story revived. The original comics were essentially collected short stories before they became stories that could last through a year or more of issues. It’s nice to see what can be done with short form comics with modern comic storytelling conventions. Returning to the first half of this volume, we also have the very American subject of redemption. Again, I know there were redemption stories before America (see, for one thing, stories in The Bible), but they are certainly a common theme in American stories. A young couple without the education to take white collar jobs turns to masterful pick-pocketing to earn enough money to get married and start a family. It’s another interesting theme that certainly deserves some investigation. I’ve seen it in a lot of stories, mostly older stories from the 50s and 60s where characters who are down on their luck thinks that things will look up once they get married. Of course, being married won’t magically get them jobs or money, but for some reason it’s a pretty common theme. When they get caught by some vampires and turned, rather than lust for power like some of the trampled upon in the anthology, they decide to look for a cure and, in the meanwhile, only feed on evil people like wifebeaters. It’s not an unheard of trope, but the way Snyder couples their competing desires and fear of the unknown really brings the emotion to the reader while telling this most American of stories. Questions? Comments? I love discussion and invite it whereever you happen to come upon this article.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cakehatwombat

    Just gotta make it to the end.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.0 Well...this just didn't work for me.  In part, it's my own fault -- I didn't catch on that this was a collection of short works with a vampire theme, so of course when the story switched characters and drastically switched art, I was lost.  That's when I stepped back and checked to see what I was reading.  Even knowing this, it didn't work as a collection for me. I've been reading and enjoying vampire literature before it was ( This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.0 Well...this just didn't work for me.  In part, it's my own fault -- I didn't catch on that this was a collection of short works with a vampire theme, so of course when the story switched characters and drastically switched art, I was lost.  That's when I stepped back and checked to see what I was reading.  Even knowing this, it didn't work as a collection for me. I've been reading and enjoying vampire literature before it was (recently) popular, and as I've gone through a number of good graphic novels lately, I was looking forward to some good, visually appealing vampire work. The book starts in 1967 with a motorcycle-riding cowboy vampire being blown up in a diner.  There isn't much by way of explanation except his boasting of being the first American Vampire.  He (Skinner Sweet) talks about stories, stories about himself, and then we move to the year 1588, and it had been my impression that Skinner is still narrating, with the story of a village of vampires that decimate the Choanoke tribe of natives and how the natives learned to fight back.  I was waiting for an explanation as to how Skinner Sweet, the First American Vampire, fit in to the story, but was never told.  Then the story moves to 1856, Topeka, Kansas with a young couple looking to begin their lives together and make a homestead.  The homestead is attacked by a vampire who looks not unlike Skinner (but it's hard to tell ... the art is very different in style) and there is a fight. The story pretty clearly is done, and a new one starts, 1877 in Canada.  A hunter/trapper encounters a lone child.  They don't speak the same language but they both understand fear when vampires attack. 1924 Death Valley.  Definitely another Skinner Sweet story, this one not narrated by him, but about him. Hollywood, 1925.  New York, 1940. Portland, Oregon, 1940. And then back to 1967 and we bookend the short pieces with Skinner Sweet once again talking about the stories told about him.  Perhaps this is why I thought these were stories about a single vampire?  The lack of consistency, both in story-telling, as well as in art, makes the first half to two-thirds of this book confusing. That last portion of the book, fifty-some pages, is one story, "The Long Road to Hell," by Scott Snyder and Raphael Albuquerque.  It's a story of teen-age love, in the midst of vampires, that survives to the bitter end.  It is well told and illustrated, but it is a bit flat.  There is nothing to hold us to the story.  None of the characters are compelling. The artwork in this collection, being from a variety of artists, ranges from strong and powerful, gripping dark art, to soft, almost romatic sketchy art that doesn't feel appropriate for vampire stories. I like the idea of a graphic novel with short vampire stories, but this particular collection was less than satisfying.  I'd be willing to try another volume -- there's promise here -- but they'll have to do a bit better than this to keep me interested. Looking for a good book?  This graphic novel features stories of vampires in the Americas, but it rambles and is very inconsistent.  Let's try a different volume.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    This volume is composed of a single over-sized side story and an anthology issue. So don't expect any progress with Skinner Sweet's or Pearl's stories. The Long Road to Hell was entertaining but the couple is no Sweet and Pearl. And writing this review just a week after reading this I can't really remember anything from this story, never a good thing. There are several big names in the anthology. But like any anthology there are hits and misses. The writing and art styles cover a wide range so the This volume is composed of a single over-sized side story and an anthology issue. So don't expect any progress with Skinner Sweet's or Pearl's stories. The Long Road to Hell was entertaining but the couple is no Sweet and Pearl. And writing this review just a week after reading this I can't really remember anything from this story, never a good thing. There are several big names in the anthology. But like any anthology there are hits and misses. The writing and art styles cover a wide range so there should be something for everyone. I tended to like the stories from writers and artists I was already familiar with, such as Becky Cloonan and Gail Simone, although I did not read the credits until afterward. Given how several of the short stories in the anthology include vampire massacres in the early days of America it's amazing the continent was settled at all. It felt like every pioneer settlement and Indian tribe was plagued by groups of vampires. It wound up feeling a bit silly.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    Now that's how you take a hiatus! Comparing this with other series that have had mid run pauses to regather before the push to the end, this is a very good effort. You could skip this volume entirely without affecting the main story arch - the stories are of no consequence and don't alter any of the established characters. The Travis Kidd one shot was a bit silly, but does introduce a creepy side character who may turn up again. The use of guests writers to tell and write stories in the anthology Now that's how you take a hiatus! Comparing this with other series that have had mid run pauses to regather before the push to the end, this is a very good effort. You could skip this volume entirely without affecting the main story arch - the stories are of no consequence and don't alter any of the established characters. The Travis Kidd one shot was a bit silly, but does introduce a creepy side character who may turn up again. The use of guests writers to tell and write stories in the anthology section was great, if anything it reinforces how much I like Snyder and Albuquerque efforts. The only thing of note to come from this was that the main story is going to kick off again in the late 1960's. I am looking forward to seeing all of the threads pull together (and whittle down the cast) in future volumes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Davis

    After 5 very good volumes, this one is a big disappointment. The first story, The Long Road to Hell, about a couple who are turned into vampires to serve a boss against their will is the highlight, although it ends badly. Skinner Sweet makes an appearance, although he is not used to great effect. Then, the remaining stories really go off the rails. it's not so much the story lines, but the very poor artwork. REALLY POOR! A story about an abolitionist couple set in Kansas during the Civil War is After 5 very good volumes, this one is a big disappointment. The first story, The Long Road to Hell, about a couple who are turned into vampires to serve a boss against their will is the highlight, although it ends badly. Skinner Sweet makes an appearance, although he is not used to great effect. Then, the remaining stories really go off the rails. it's not so much the story lines, but the very poor artwork. REALLY POOR! A story about an abolitionist couple set in Kansas during the Civil War is the worst drawn story by far. I had to return my copy to the library today, so I cannot list the the artists, (I should have made notes, but I was just too anxious to leave the thing and move on.)

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