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The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years

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Celebrating Batman and Joker's seventy-five years as cultural icons, this hardcover Joker Anthology collects stories from the characters seven decades as the greatest villain in comics. Featuring stories from BATMAN #1, 5, 25, 32, 85, 163, 251, 427, BATMAN #15 (THE NEW 52), DETECTIVE COMICS #64, 168, 180, 475, 476, 726, 741, 826, DETECTIVE COMICS #1 (THE NEW 52), WORLD’S F Celebrating Batman and Joker's seventy-five years as cultural icons, this hardcover Joker Anthology collects stories from the characters seven decades as the greatest villain in comics. Featuring stories from BATMAN #1, 5, 25, 32, 85, 163, 251, 427, BATMAN #15 (THE NEW 52), DETECTIVE COMICS #64, 168, 180, 475, 476, 726, 741, 826, DETECTIVE COMICS #1 (THE NEW 52), WORLD’S FINEST COMICS #61, SUPERMAN #9 and BATMAN: LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT #66.


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Celebrating Batman and Joker's seventy-five years as cultural icons, this hardcover Joker Anthology collects stories from the characters seven decades as the greatest villain in comics. Featuring stories from BATMAN #1, 5, 25, 32, 85, 163, 251, 427, BATMAN #15 (THE NEW 52), DETECTIVE COMICS #64, 168, 180, 475, 476, 726, 741, 826, DETECTIVE COMICS #1 (THE NEW 52), WORLD’S F Celebrating Batman and Joker's seventy-five years as cultural icons, this hardcover Joker Anthology collects stories from the characters seven decades as the greatest villain in comics. Featuring stories from BATMAN #1, 5, 25, 32, 85, 163, 251, 427, BATMAN #15 (THE NEW 52), DETECTIVE COMICS #64, 168, 180, 475, 476, 726, 741, 826, DETECTIVE COMICS #1 (THE NEW 52), WORLD’S FINEST COMICS #61, SUPERMAN #9 and BATMAN: LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT #66.

30 review for The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣

    This is my first experience with any of the Batman comics. I've known Joker for as long as I can remember (from the cartoons and then from the movies). And to speak the truth, I've always thought him to be kind of a joke. Now I'm not so sure anymore. I found the early comics tedious. I disliked the art and I disliked Batman. He was... I don't know... funny?! The way he looked and his lines felt so, so bad. He almost seemed good-spirited. And I'm used to the dark, depressed Batman (the way he This is my first experience with any of the Batman comics. I've known Joker for as long as I can remember (from the cartoons and then from the movies). And to speak the truth, I've always thought him to be kind of a joke. Now I'm not so sure anymore. I found the early comics tedious. I disliked the art and I disliked Batman. He was... I don't know... funny?! The way he looked and his lines felt so, so bad. He almost seemed good-spirited. And I'm used to the dark, depressed Batman (the way he has been depicted in movies didn't help with that). Anyway, this was never about Bats, it's always been about Joker. I love him and his insanity, his freedom from any empathy and/or remorse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This is a complicated rating for me. Perhaps the most complicated of the year. See, the first 300 or so pages of this book are pretty much 1.5 stars. When I wasn't bored I was dreading turning the page because I was sure boredom was coming. The last 150 or so pages are 5 stars. I usually love older DC comics because if I'm not laughing at how campy the dialogue is (Dick, my son, I love you but you tell more dad jokes than Danny Tanner) I'm interested in the mystery. With the Joker, they started This is a complicated rating for me. Perhaps the most complicated of the year. See, the first 300 or so pages of this book are pretty much 1.5 stars. When I wasn't bored I was dreading turning the page because I was sure boredom was coming. The last 150 or so pages are 5 stars. I usually love older DC comics because if I'm not laughing at how campy the dialogue is (Dick, my son, I love you but you tell more dad jokes than Danny Tanner) I'm interested in the mystery. With the Joker, they started with a cold blooded, calculated killer. He made radio broadcasts about who was on his hit list and then he terrorized Gotham by sneaking in and killing his targets despite the police's best efforts. He drove Batman crazy and he was a force to be reckoned with. Then the Comics Code came along and said "Yeah, you're scaring the kiddies. Get rid of him or lighten him up." So, they turned the Joker into a cheesy, goofball bank robber Batman '66 would be proud of. It was so goofy I put this book down several times. The art wasn't great either. Then the 70's happened, the Comics Code lightened up and they flipped the switch and turned Joker into a monster again. Well, he killed people with his laughing gas again. Then he killed Jason Todd and it seemed like that was the worst he could do. For the 80's, beating a child to death with a crowbar was pretty damn bad. Then we hit the millennium and it was like the writers said "You thought that was evil? Watch this!" It got so much worse. Violence wise. The writing got significantly better. The most horrifying story, one that reminded me of that episode of Six Feet Under that me and most everyone could never sit through again, is the one where Tim unknowingly gets in the car with the Joker. He gasses Tim, ties him to the car seat and drives through the Gotham night with a dead married couple in the backseat. They've been Joker gassed to die with huge grins on their faces and Tim is rightfully horrified. He's trying to get out when he feels a toy car underneath the seat and he realizes this couple have a little boy that's been orphaned. He's forced to sit there as the Joker drives through the city hitting people indiscriminately. He kills several people, all the while telling Tim there's no way he'll be able to escape. The final straw is him driving closer and closer to a group of children sitting on Santa's lap. Tim's horrified and in a brilliant moment, tells a Marx joke and the Joker veers off course. He distracts the Joker with Groucho anecdotes and manages to escape. Tim's actually incredibly badass and relatable here. It was that story and the portion from No Man's Land when he kills a woman trying to save the 80 babies he kidnapped that convinced me the writers were done with telling stories where the Joker is a clever figure and went straight into, he's a thoughtless killer. Watch what he does next! The last stories are from the New 52, including the story where the Dollmaker cuts his face off. Not sure why he did that just to tape (?) it back on. It's grotesque, that's for sure. The last story follows him trying to track down Alfred during Death of the Family. I read that arc and I wasn't super impressed, not gonna lie. Anyway, the last page really stuck with me. The Joker does all of this because he thinks the Batfam is making Bruce weaker: "It happens all of a sudden, just a tiny shift, but there it is. You stare back and you see it. The smallest flicker in the pupils, but still. And you say to yourself, see? Beneath it all he's just what you thought he was. A man. And ignore the fact that what you saw those tiny pupils do was expand. Expand for you after you stared back long enough. Ignore the fact that what you saw those black points expand with... was love." They've been trying to build this relationship where the Joker has this twisted obsession with Batman. That he feels a kinship and a type of love for him but these last few stories are the only times I really got that feeling. Maybe if they'd focused on the issues that were more like that, I would've been more interested. So, the first 300 pages get 1.5 stars. The last 150 or so get 5 stars. There's a really great part of the story "Going Sane" where the Joker gets amnesia and thinks he's a man named Joseph Kerr. He meets a woman, falls in love and they share a life but he's having a mental breakdown and dreaming about being the Joker. It's so interesting because there's a voiceover from his girlfriend turned fiancée as he slowly reveals his true nature. It ends with her being hopeful for the future but we, the reader, know everything's going to hell.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    I just love the joker he's definitely my fave, you just know whenever his crazy ass shows up shit is about to go down and i'm always fully on board for that, so this collection is just all sorts of glorious and i was in my element reading this, it's awesome. Some you may have read before, but there's bound to be some that make you wanna go pick up that trade as this includes a bunch of different issues, either way it's just a neat collection to own and definitely worth picking up. I just love the joker he's definitely my fave, you just know whenever his crazy ass shows up shit is about to go down and i'm always fully on board for that, so this collection is just all sorts of glorious and i was in my element reading this, it's awesome. Some you may have read before, but there's bound to be some that make you wanna go pick up that trade as this includes a bunch of different issues, either way it's just a neat collection to own and definitely worth picking up.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This is a five star book that could've been even better. The Joker is one of, if not the most notable or well known villains in all of comics, as well as pop culture as well. I think they easily could've chosen a couple of different stories, especially in the nineties, (Batman Adventures) But this is a most read for any Joker fan or Batman fan.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Malaakai

    i thought it was all over the place in graphic wise and story wise it would go from escaping a asylum to holding children hostage to killing them off one by one

  6. 5 out of 5

    Because_I'm_Batman

    Holly cow! This was crazy! I loved this! So it was just so cool watching the progression of the Joker, from Clown Prince of Crime, to Crazy Psychopath. I mean wow, this was insane. The changes over the decades, were to cool to watch, the art, the plots, even the development of the characters. I loved it, it was such a brilliant collection of stories, I was a little bummed at the end how some of the stories were just experts from bigger books so I didn't get the complete story but for the price, Holly cow! This was crazy! I loved this! So it was just so cool watching the progression of the Joker, from Clown Prince of Crime, to Crazy Psychopath. I mean wow, this was insane. The changes over the decades, were to cool to watch, the art, the plots, even the development of the characters. I loved it, it was such a brilliant collection of stories, I was a little bummed at the end how some of the stories were just experts from bigger books so I didn't get the complete story but for the price, it was just perfect, so many books all in one. I loved it! The Joker is one of my favorite villains, when he's not scaring the crap out of me, he's saying some creepy pun or line, that has me laughing despite myself. I was so excited to see where the writers would take them next. Beyond just the Joker it was interesting to see the different styles of Comics, how comics in general have changed, and I loved the little breaks they had between parts were they gave a brief description on the history of the Joker and how he had changed. The very last words of this book gave me shivers, a perfect ending, for the collection!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brad McKenna

    The Joker was creepy even in the 40s. This collection is like the Batman 75th anniversary collect the highlights prove that the comics code damn near ruined comics in the 40s and 50s. Once the 70s hit, though, Joker was better than ever. Nothing delves into the human condition quite like a madman. The New 52, however, has turned the character into something I don't particularly care for: a sadist. In what seems to be an attempt to attract a generation that grew up on the Saw movies, they've turn The Joker was creepy even in the 40s. This collection is like the Batman 75th anniversary collect the highlights prove that the comics code damn near ruined comics in the 40s and 50s. Once the 70s hit, though, Joker was better than ever. Nothing delves into the human condition quite like a madman. The New 52, however, has turned the character into something I don't particularly care for: a sadist. In what seems to be an attempt to attract a generation that grew up on the Saw movies, they've turned Joker into a grotesque character. While I admit he was never above the macabre,m I'm sad to see such a cerebral character turn into a gross-out one. But if I've learned anything in my years reading comics, it's nothing lasts forever. This too shall pass.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Rose

    A must read for anybody who is a fan of the Joker. While it doesn't cover every aspect of the character (what single book could?) the book is great for anybody who wants to learn more about the incredible villain. The fascinating thing while reading this book is not just witnessing the evolution of the character, but also witnessing the evolution of American pop culture as well. To see Joker in the 40s, 60s, 90s, and 2000s is to see how evil itself has changed and the change, while grim, and vil A must read for anybody who is a fan of the Joker. While it doesn't cover every aspect of the character (what single book could?) the book is great for anybody who wants to learn more about the incredible villain. The fascinating thing while reading this book is not just witnessing the evolution of the character, but also witnessing the evolution of American pop culture as well. To see Joker in the 40s, 60s, 90s, and 2000s is to see how evil itself has changed and the change, while grim, and vile, is something one cannot look away from, like a terrible car wreck, something I feel the Joker himself would view as a great compliment.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kassandra

    This books was simply awesome, being able to see how the Joker has changed throughout the years since the 1940's was pretty nice. Seeing how different writers and artists took this character and make him who he is today was well worth reading :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    Joker, based on work by Bob Kane, bill Finger and others Eight out of 10 There are so many levels to talk about in and about Joker, which seems to be a favorite already for the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role – and indeed, Joaquin Phoenix is mesmerizing, spectacular, overwhelming as The Joker aka Arthur Fleck. On the basic level, this cinephile and some publications have been less than exultant about the complete motion picture – leaving aside the aforementioned rare, ebullient, marv Joker, based on work by Bob Kane, bill Finger and others Eight out of 10 There are so many levels to talk about in and about Joker, which seems to be a favorite already for the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role – and indeed, Joaquin Phoenix is mesmerizing, spectacular, overwhelming as The Joker aka Arthur Fleck. On the basic level, this cinephile and some publications have been less than exultant about the complete motion picture – leaving aside the aforementioned rare, ebullient, marvelous and so complex Joaquin Phoenix one man show – and some would be ready to dismiss it altogether as Much Ado About Little – let us not say nothing. But even if one is tempted to look only at the surface and simplistically say there is not much substance, apart from the troubles of a lunatic that becomes a dangerous killer and the long quest for revenge, an outpouring of violence – hence the R rating – which does not seem all that different from and superior to other movies. There is also the idea that Joker is not much more than an amalgam made from two Martin Scorsese classics, The King of Comedy and Taxi Driver, and the writer – director Todd Philips (director, producer of The Hangover) accepts the influence, but appears to suggest that ‘it was a specific era of cinema that inspired his take on the classic villain’. The descent into Hades does not come in a flash, but we expect – we are also aware in advance, from the rating and the tremendous the buzz surrounding the film – that things would go downhill quickly, even if at the start, poor Arthur is a victim. Actually, on another level – and as mentioned before, there are some different perspectives, angles from which we could look at the saga of Arthur Fleck – we can see the antihero as a victim, given that he discovers (and the audience with him) that he had been abused in childhood and moreover, his mother had been a bystander, with hindsight, it she could be seen as an accomplice, when the boy was subject to violence, physical and psychological. As a myriad of studies demonstrate, those who have been abused in their tender age, become more than likely to inflict pain and suffering on others, once they become adults – which raises the question of how to look at them, at the issue and more importantly, what to do about it, how to prevent calamities and be reasonable, delicate and cautious…all at the same time In the opening scenes, the joker is attacked; some teenagers steal a sign he was pushing, in his costume – by the way, the makeup and the look of the main character are extraordinary and help the exuberant, fantastic actor project such a troubling, Haunting Image – and he makes the mistake of chasing after them, only to be kicked and hurt terribly. Seeing that he is so bruised, Randall, one of the colleagues at the outfit where the antihero works, offers him a gun – one of the parts that seem bizarre (but then, when dealing with a psychopath, all his demeanor must look outré by definition) is the attack on this individual, which seems unmotivated, unless the undersigned has missed so much – and later on, Arthur takes it to a children’s party The relationship that Arthur has with his mother – up to the moment when he discovers that the past is not what he thought it was – reminds the viewer of the unforgettable, miraculous Rupert Pupkin – who shouted when he was reviewing his comedy act…’it’s impossible, it’s impossible!’- but when the aspiring comedian is recorded trying on his peculiar, tense, scary, strenuous, outlandish laugh and the humor in a hall, it reaches the show of Murray Franklin aka divine Robert De Niro. The talk show host mocks Arthur and his performance, calling it a Joker, and he would pay dearly for this contempt, later on, when the antihero is invited on the air – which is yet another similarity with Pupkin, who wants to be presented on the show of Jerry Langford aka dark, hostile and impressive Jerry Lewis. When three men start harassing a woman who is travelling in the train, in the subway, the Joker seems to be the only other passenger around and he starts with his by now familiar, grating, haunting, strange, signature laugh, which annoys the attackers to the point where they come to the protagonist and start kicking and hitting him, up to the point where he takes the gun out and starts using it with fervor and apparently gusto. This is one of the scenes where we can perhaps have a hint of the value of the film, the fact that it is more complex than usual, average features, for although the comedian is cornered, it looks like self-defense and indeed, he would be immediately celebrated a s a hero by the public – just as Trump is such a great guy for so many fools – it is still appalling to see him enjoy the violence, immensely… The joker has just broken a record, it has become the highest – grossing R- rated movie (and already at number 13 (!) on the top Rated Movies list, as ranked by the public) with a total of $ 788.1 million at the box office and maybe on the way to at least one Oscar…

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aidan

    The Joker is one of the most iconic villains in Batman’s rogues gallery and he has certainly undergone some significant changes over the years. This book is one of a series that celebrates the anniversary of a key figure from comics. The stories are selected and presented alongside some brief commentary that reflects on the various phases of the character. As with the Arkham collections, stories have been selected to show the development of a key trait or the introduction of a new idea. This mean The Joker is one of the most iconic villains in Batman’s rogues gallery and he has certainly undergone some significant changes over the years. This book is one of a series that celebrates the anniversary of a key figure from comics. The stories are selected and presented alongside some brief commentary that reflects on the various phases of the character. As with the Arkham collections, stories have been selected to show the development of a key trait or the introduction of a new idea. This means that not every story included here is a classic and there are clearly plenty of omissions. This volume also has a habit, particularly in its later chapters, of presenting a single issue from a much larger story. As an overview though or an introduction to the character this works very well. Comments on the individual selections follow: (view spoiler)[Part One: The Grim Jester Batman vs the Joker - Batman #1 (1940) - The first issue of Batman’s own title comic featured two Joker stories. This story quickly establishes the Joker as a vicious murderer and the Batman’s first standout enemy (while Hugo Strange will become a great villain, his earlier appearances were not particularly thrilling IMO). The way the Joker is drawn is wonderfully menacing. The Riddle of the Missing Card - Batman #5 (1941) - This story sees Joker recruit a card-themed gang and is a good demonstration his viciousness in these early stories. The Joker’s jewel-stealing scheme is not particularly interesting however. The Joker Walks the Last Mile - Detective Comics #64 (1942) - Once again we are in pretty low-stakes territory with this Joker plot though it does have a great hook on the cover and some enjoyable moments. Part Two: The Clown Prince Knights of Knavery - Batman #25 (1944) - I really enjoyed this story. The concept is that the Joker and Penguin are both trying to steal a priceless emerald and decide to temporarily work together. There is plenty of entertaining bickering between the pair and though the ending falls a little flat, it is a fun ride. Rackety-Rax Racket - Batman #32 (1945) - When people talk about the softening of the Joker, this is exactly the sort of story they are referring to. Here the Joker is not being ambitious, devious or deadly - he is simply toying with Robin. It is nice to see him manipulating and playing up to his sense of humor though. The Man Behind the Red Hood - Detective Comics #168 (1951) - Significant in several respects (not least in that the character of the Red Hood will return many years later in The Killing Joke, an iconic story), this story fleshed out Joker’s history. The concept of Batman as a lecturer is fun, as is the challenge to the reader to figure out the Red Hood’s identity. The Joker’s Millions - Detective Comics #180 (1952) - A goofy story in which the Joker is named as the beneficiary in a will but quickly discovers a catch. The set up is fun and makes for one of the better light-hearted Joker stories. The Crimes of Batman - World’s Finest Comics #61 (1952) - Another light-hearted outing in which Joker threatens Robin’s life unless Batman behaves like a criminal. It quickly becomes clear where this is headed but it’s a fun, quick read. Batman - Clown of Crime - Batman #85 (1954) - Holy freaky Friday, Batman! A fun, fluffy story in which Batman and Joker bodyswap. The Joker Jury - Batman #163 (1964) - Though this story is typical of its era, it is hardly to my taste being very silly in places. Most notably, Batman is apparently raffling off tours of the Batcave. Doesn't he care about his identity remaining secret? Also, why don’t the criminals just go buy a few tickets themselves? Part Three: The Harlequin of Hate The Joker’s Five-Way Revenge - Batman #251 (1973) - Here we see the Joker presented in a much darker way, emphasizing his vicious yet whimsical nature as he eliminates former associates who may have snitched on him. Though the front half is stronger than the conclusion, I still found much to enjoy here, not least Neal Adams’ artwork. The Laughing Fish/The Sign of the Joker - Detective Comics #475-476 (1978) - A really strange two part story. The core concept was a little too ridiculous for me. To Laugh and Die in Metropolis - Superman #9 (1987) - Joker takes a break from Gotham in this fun tale in which Superman is forced to race against the clock to save his friends. A Death in the Family Chapter Four - Batman #427 (1988) - This is a single chapter from the iconic story A Death in the Family. That means that readers should be prepared that they do not get a complete narrative here - we are just getting the Joker’s part in the proceedings. I certainly understand the desire to include this story in the collection: it was a moment in which Joker took him villainy to another level yet it wasn't even the only time in 1988 in which he struck at the heart of the Bat Family. I would rather have had another story included in its entirety but ultimately you can’t complain too much about such an iconic Joker appearance. Part Four: Archnemesis Going Sane, Part Two: Swimming Lessons - Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #66 (1994) - An interesting exploration of how the Joker might respond in the absence of the Batman. The idea that the Joker might have a difficult reaction to the loss of his enemy had been suggested before, most notably in The Dark Knight Returns, but the concept takes center stage here. Fool’s Errand - Detective Comics #726 (1998) - An intriguing story where most of the action happens ‘off screen’. This is just a conversation between Batman and the Joker yet you really get a sense of how they think and the power dynamics between them. It subverts expectations masterfully. Endgame, Part Three: Sleep in Heavenly Peace - Detective Comics #741 (2000) - This story loses a little of its impact coming outside its original arc but it represents another moment where we see the Joker triumphant. Slayride - Detective Comics #826 (2007) - The Joker works surprisingly well in a holiday context. This is an excellent story in which the Joker kidnaps Robin and takes him on a deadly car ride. This story explores his sense of humor and captures his warped priority of placing the joke above his own safety. To me this is my favorite story in the collection. Part Five: Rebirth Faces of Death - Detective Comics #1 (2011) - While I think the story itself is not the most compelling one in this collection, it ends on such a striking image that it easily justifies its inclusion here. But Here’s the Kicker - Batman #15 (2012) - This final story is not the most iconic issue of Death of the Family but it is probably a better selection for this compilation. Here we see Batman and his Bat Family trying to understand the Joker’s motivations and predict what he may have done. Perhaps the most powerful conclusion we can take from it is that the Joker is a character who can carry and loom over a story without even directly appearing in it. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years is a compilation of some of the most notable Joker stories over the years to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary debut of one of the most iconic comic villains – at least in the Batman Family (2014). Over the years, there were many incarnations and depictions of The Clown Prince of Crime and this collection explores them all rather well. This anthology is divided into five sections or more precisely comic era. The first section depicts the Joker in the G The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years is a compilation of some of the most notable Joker stories over the years to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary debut of one of the most iconic comic villains – at least in the Batman Family (2014). Over the years, there were many incarnations and depictions of The Clown Prince of Crime and this collection explores them all rather well. This anthology is divided into five sections or more precisely comic era. The first section depicts the Joker in the Golden Age of Comics, then Silver, Bronze, Modern, and Rebirth Ages follow with each successive section. It is very interesting to see how the Joker evolve or devolve from a simple Grim Jester to becoming Batman's chief archnemesis filled with madness and with deadly consequences. It was really interesting to see how the Joker was with his first appearance in Batman #1 and what he has become today. As a whole, The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years is a rather balanced book, showing each section rather evenly and not placing any favoritism in any of the eras. It gives us a nice perception of the era in which these stories were produced – a reflection of the times. With anthologies like these, story selection would be the most difficult task – the Joker has been around for a long time and there are many stories with many having different favorites – in short it is impossible to please everyone. However, I think the editors picked a somewhat nice selection that shows the characteristic that is the Joker. So on the whole, I was really happy of which stories were presented. All in all, I think The Joker: A Celebration of 75 Years is a wonderful selection of stories over the three-quarters of a century that this fiendish clown has been around. It is a good reference anthology for both the avid and subdued fan alike.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelley Frank

    I’ve been a Joker fan since the early 90s, and I’ve read a lot of Joker books. I make a point of checking out these best of collections to make sure I have a handle on current interpretations of the character, how modern fans are defining the character, and what he industry sees as the best Joker stories. The tales chosen for each collection are pretty telling, and this is no exception. The book starts with pretty standard choices: Joker’s first appearance and his reappearance in the 1940s, and s I’ve been a Joker fan since the early 90s, and I’ve read a lot of Joker books. I make a point of checking out these best of collections to make sure I have a handle on current interpretations of the character, how modern fans are defining the character, and what he industry sees as the best Joker stories. The tales chosen for each collection are pretty telling, and this is no exception. The book starts with pretty standard choices: Joker’s first appearance and his reappearance in the 1940s, and some Golden Age selections like “Joker’s Millions.” These are good foundations for someone new to Joker and Batman’s dynamic and gives some good background before moving to newer stuff. The 70s-90s selections are particularly good: standards like “The Joker’s Five-Way Revenge” through “A Death in the Family.” There is some attempt to include standalone issues in larger tales that sometimes feel forced — part two of “Going Sane” feels a bit off here, especially considering the lack of Bruce Timm and Paul Dini, even Tim Sale Joker interpretations. In the end, a good chunk of the book is dedicated to Rebirth Joker, which makes sense because it’s what DC wants to make popular. Rebirth is a bit like fetch though: you can’t just make it happen. It’s got a lot to offer, but shouldn’t be the main focus. Overall, another great Joker collection. Definitely gives insight into the character and why he stands in a prominent position within pop culture and the DC Universe. I strongly suggest reading other books though afterwards. There are plenty of other great Joker stories out there that aren’t #edgy. Try “The Best Man” parts 1 and 2 (Batman #48-49, 2018) for example, Batman: White Knight, or Batman: The Dark Prince Charming. These are all very recent, relevant stories that get at more nuance. If you like my reviews, check out my blog at MorbidSmile.com

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scott Williams

    This is a great collection. The Silver Age stories remain my favourites. I like that they include more narrative text. As much as I enjoy comic artwork, I really love the written word. It’s totally possible to tell a story only with images, but I find some of the more recent stories more difficult to follow because of the lack of text. Anyway, the Joker might be the greatest comic villain of all time. He’s exceptionally versatile and his look is iconic. This is a collection well worth exploring.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scott Vela

    A trip into madness Haven't read some of these classic stories for years....wonderful read. The Joker is like Moriaty from the Sherlock Holmes stories. The only character to match with Batman.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Great book! The Joker is one of the most complex characters I've ever encountered, and his journey from clownster to extremely dark murderer is worth at least one book. Loved it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sagan

    You get a bit of whiplash going from 60's campy Joker into Death in the Family, but really a great collection.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mhorg

    OK Like most anthologies this has its ups and downs. I would rather have seen more stories from the Adams/O Neil era than the recent new 52 ones.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Puckett

    A fantastic sampling of all the things that make Mistah J a fun read!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert Noll

    The stories after 1973 are the best, with my favorite being from 1994.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    Great collection This is a great collection of stories. There were a few weak ones but overall, a good collection was presented.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Anne

    Every hero needs an archnemesis; Batman's is just as fucked up as he is, but has put his damage to different uses (a theme that seems to run throughout the Batman universe). This collection features key times in Batman's life when the Joker has shown up to wreak havoc on him, Gotham, the Bat family, random squirrels...anyone unfortunate enough to be in his path, really. From the silly to the sociopathic, we get the full spectrum of bad guy stuff. I think I prefer the silliness, quite honestly, b Every hero needs an archnemesis; Batman's is just as fucked up as he is, but has put his damage to different uses (a theme that seems to run throughout the Batman universe). This collection features key times in Batman's life when the Joker has shown up to wreak havoc on him, Gotham, the Bat family, random squirrels...anyone unfortunate enough to be in his path, really. From the silly to the sociopathic, we get the full spectrum of bad guy stuff. I think I prefer the silliness, quite honestly, because as you go through the volume, the nasty just keeps getting nastier and nastier. What DOES Harley Quinn see in this guy? Must be the impeccably tailored suits. My favorite story in this set was part 2 of "Going Sane," which I want to read in its entirety now. The Joker has amnesia, thinks he's a normal guy named Joseph Kerr, and has a quiet, normal life on the fringes of Gotham. He's even got a girlfriend, too, a sweet, shy woman named Rebecca who likes the same thing he does (classic television, oldies music, etc.). But Mr. Kerr's also having horrible nightmares, as if something buried deep down is just waiting to burrow its way out and burn shit down. Arglebargle, the feels, and the creepiness. Minus one star for being incredibly squicked by the violence.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects 20 comics from throughout the 75 years of Joker's history in DC Comics. Split into five parts, each part begins with a page or so of text talking about the eras that Joker existed in. Part I: The Grim Jester Part II: The Clown Prince Part III: The Harlequin of Hate Part IV: Archnemesis Part V: Rebirth I really enjoyed this collection, even though there is no through-line to the storytelling. Readers just get various glimpses at the character throughout time. I especially enjoyed the earlier a Collects 20 comics from throughout the 75 years of Joker's history in DC Comics. Split into five parts, each part begins with a page or so of text talking about the eras that Joker existed in. Part I: The Grim Jester Part II: The Clown Prince Part III: The Harlequin of Hate Part IV: Archnemesis Part V: Rebirth I really enjoyed this collection, even though there is no through-line to the storytelling. Readers just get various glimpses at the character throughout time. I especially enjoyed the earlier appearances of Joker (it was fun flipping through the pages of his first appearance in Batman issue #1). Even though the psychotic, chaotic version of Joker is likely more true to the original personality he was given, I have a soft spot in my heart for the goofy, non-murderous version of Joker. I checked this out from the library, and although I don't often do this, I could see myself buying this in the future. I would like to have this on my shelf.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Pretty much what it says on the tin. A collected sampling of Joker-centric comic books (mostly Batman, of course) from across the last 75 or so years, interspersed with bits of commentary, in a pretty hardcover book. Some of the early ones... I swear, it seems like they were written not only for, but literally *by* 12-year-olds. Not exactly quality literature, by any stretch of the imagination. Interesting to see the changes over the years. Early Joker was...basically, just a sociopath who looked Pretty much what it says on the tin. A collected sampling of Joker-centric comic books (mostly Batman, of course) from across the last 75 or so years, interspersed with bits of commentary, in a pretty hardcover book. Some of the early ones... I swear, it seems like they were written not only for, but literally *by* 12-year-olds. Not exactly quality literature, by any stretch of the imagination. Interesting to see the changes over the years. Early Joker was...basically, just a sociopath who looked like a clown, really. The schtick was just a thin veneer over "dude who likes to murder people for fun and profit". Then, for a while, he was more explicitly "clowny", and not especially violent, before more or less settling on clowny and/or insane *and* incredibly violent and murdery. I recieved this from Goodreads for free in exchange for a review, insert standard boilerplate here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adam Bender

    This is an excellent all-around collection of Joker stories. As a big Batman fan I've read a lot of the old stories, so I had worried going in that there wouldn't be much new here. To my pleasant surprise, DC Comics has selected many great comics that I've not seen in previous greatest hits collections. With a few selections from each decade, it's really interesting to see how the Joker has changed over time -- from a psychopathic killer to a clown thief and back again, based largely on society's This is an excellent all-around collection of Joker stories. As a big Batman fan I've read a lot of the old stories, so I had worried going in that there wouldn't be much new here. To my pleasant surprise, DC Comics has selected many great comics that I've not seen in previous greatest hits collections. With a few selections from each decade, it's really interesting to see how the Joker has changed over time -- from a psychopathic killer to a clown thief and back again, based largely on society's tolerance for violence at that particular time in history. I'm also happy to say that the book ends with two really strong stories from Paul Dini and Scott Snyder, showing that this character has not only held up for 75 years, but he's actually getting better and better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

    I'm a big fan of the Joker, and when I found this book for a good price on Amazon, I figured I'd give it a try. Overall, it was a great book. As a relatively new comic book reader, it was cool to see the beginning of Joker and Batman's rivalry and read some of their most iconic stories. I must admit, I'm not a fan of the Gold and Silver age of comics. So the fact that about half of this book falls into either of those categories wasn't that great for me, but I'm sure lots of people are happy abo I'm a big fan of the Joker, and when I found this book for a good price on Amazon, I figured I'd give it a try. Overall, it was a great book. As a relatively new comic book reader, it was cool to see the beginning of Joker and Batman's rivalry and read some of their most iconic stories. I must admit, I'm not a fan of the Gold and Silver age of comics. So the fact that about half of this book falls into either of those categories wasn't that great for me, but I'm sure lots of people are happy about the selection of comics in the book. But the book as a whole was very nice and it's a great way to have loads of comics that would otherwise I'm sure would be hard to track down and/or very expensive.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Candace Perry

    I came into this knowing I was going to hate it. I hate the Joker as a character, so I really wouldn't have read this in a million years if it wasn't on the list for the class. The only stories I liked were the campier ones, especially where the Joker has to steal money to pay the IRS, but he doesn't want anyone to know it's him so he tries to pull really low-level boring crimes. I also liked the one with Superman in it but that's because I like Superman :) It would be very interesting to those w I came into this knowing I was going to hate it. I hate the Joker as a character, so I really wouldn't have read this in a million years if it wasn't on the list for the class. The only stories I liked were the campier ones, especially where the Joker has to steal money to pay the IRS, but he doesn't want anyone to know it's him so he tries to pull really low-level boring crimes. I also liked the one with Superman in it but that's because I like Superman :) It would be very interesting to those who like the Joker and the Batman mythos in general, so if you like that I recommend it. If you are like me and don't, read the Shazam (Captain Marvel), Flash, or Superman 75 year celebration books, they were much better.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Viktória Larišová

    Stories up to the 70s rather boring and obviously contained in the book mainly out of respect for the evolution of the character - it is, after all, "A Celebration of 75 Years". But the era between 70s and 00s surely produced some amazing stories, and those included in the book, as must be said, were chosen with great care and precision. And even though I'm not a fan of the Joker in the new 52, the last story included was also pretty good, chilling to the bone, but also somewhat comfortable and Stories up to the 70s rather boring and obviously contained in the book mainly out of respect for the evolution of the character - it is, after all, "A Celebration of 75 Years". But the era between 70s and 00s surely produced some amazing stories, and those included in the book, as must be said, were chosen with great care and precision. And even though I'm not a fan of the Joker in the new 52, the last story included was also pretty good, chilling to the bone, but also somewhat comfortable and familiar for a reader such as myself. Not a "wow-material", but certainly masterful and carefully put-together book centered around one of the most recognizable and interesting comic-book villain ever.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    This is defiantly an essential to anyone who is a fan of the Joker or Batman in general. It is interesting to see how The Joker's and Batman's relationship stays the same despite different writers, different times and different incarnations of the same two characters. The Joker has gotten increasing sinister, and violent with each incarnation of the character from the Clown Prince of Crime to, Batman's arch-nemesis to the modern rebirth of Joker with the new 52.It obvious why Joker is a villain This is defiantly an essential to anyone who is a fan of the Joker or Batman in general. It is interesting to see how The Joker's and Batman's relationship stays the same despite different writers, different times and different incarnations of the same two characters. The Joker has gotten increasing sinister, and violent with each incarnation of the character from the Clown Prince of Crime to, Batman's arch-nemesis to the modern rebirth of Joker with the new 52.It obvious why Joker is a villain that has lasted throughout the years and various incarnations of Batman's comics, movies,television shows and games. I received this book from Goodreads.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Musto

    The dark and the light, the yin and the yang. One simply cannot exist without the other. Throughout the 75-year history of the Caped Crusader, the Joker has been the other side to Batman. The flip side of the same coin (sorry, Two-Face), Joker is the lighthearted, murderous worst case scenario of what Batman could become. It all comes down to belief. Batman believes in justice, Joker worships chaos. Please read my full review at this link. The dark and the light, the yin and the yang. One simply cannot exist without the other. Throughout the 75-year history of the Caped Crusader, the Joker has been the other side to Batman. The flip side of the same coin (sorry, Two-Face), Joker is the lighthearted, murderous worst case scenario of what Batman could become. It all comes down to belief. Batman believes in justice, Joker worships chaos. Please read my full review at this link.

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