counter create hit The Cases That Haunt Us: From Jack the Ripper to JonBenet Ramsey, the FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Unravels the Mysteries That Won't Go Away - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Cases That Haunt Us: From Jack the Ripper to JonBenet Ramsey, the FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Unravels the Mysteries That Won't Go Away

Availability: Ready to download

America's foremost expert on criminal profiling provides his uniquely gripping analysis of seven of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime -- from the Whitechapel murders to JonBenet Ramsey -- often contradicting conventional wisdom and legal decisions. Jack the Ripper. Lizzie Borden. The Zodiac Killer. Certain homicide cases maintain an undeniable, almost America's foremost expert on criminal profiling provides his uniquely gripping analysis of seven of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime -- from the Whitechapel murders to JonBenet Ramsey -- often contradicting conventional wisdom and legal decisions. Jack the Ripper. Lizzie Borden. The Zodiac Killer. Certain homicide cases maintain an undeniable, almost mystical hold on the public imagination. They touch a nerve deep within us because of the personalities involved, their senseless depravity, the nagging doubts about whether justice was done, or because, in some instances, no suspect has ever been identified or caught. In "The Cases That Haunt Us," twenty-five-year-FBI-veteran John Douglas, profiling pioneer and master of modern criminal investigative analysis, and author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, the team behind the bestselling Mindhunter series, explore the tantalizing mysteries that both their legions of fans and law enforcement professionals ask about most. Among the questions they tackle: Was Jack the Ripper actually the Duke of Clarence, eldest grandson of Queen Victoria, or perhaps a practicing medical doctor? And did highly placed individuals within Scotland Yard have a good idea of the Ripper's identity, which they never revealed? Douglas and Olshaker create a detailed profile of the killer, and reveal their chief suspect. Was Lizzie Borden truly innocent of the murder of her father and stepmother as the Fall River, Massachusetts, jury decided, or was she the one who took the ax and delivered those infamous "whacks"? Through a minute-by-minute behavioral analysis of the crime, the authors come to a convincing conclusion. Did BrunoRichard Hauptmann single-handedly kidnap the baby son of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, the most famous couple in the world, or was he an innocent man caught up and ultimately executed in a relentless rush to judgment in the "crime of the century"? What kind of person could kill six-year-old JonBenet Ramsey on Christmas night in her own home? Douglas was called in on the case shortly after the horrifying murder, and his conclusions are hard-hitting and controversial. Why, in the face of the majority of public, media, and law enforcement opinion, including former FBI colleagues, does Douglas believe that John and Patricia Ramsey did not murder their daughter? And what is the forensic and behavioral evidence he brings to bear to make his claim? Taking a fresh and penetrating look at each case, the authors reexamine and reinterpret accepted facts and victimology using modern profiling and the techniques of criminal analysis developed by Douglas within the FBI. This book deconstructs the evidence and widely held beliefs surrounding each case and rebuilds them -- with fascinating and haunting results.


Compare

America's foremost expert on criminal profiling provides his uniquely gripping analysis of seven of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime -- from the Whitechapel murders to JonBenet Ramsey -- often contradicting conventional wisdom and legal decisions. Jack the Ripper. Lizzie Borden. The Zodiac Killer. Certain homicide cases maintain an undeniable, almost America's foremost expert on criminal profiling provides his uniquely gripping analysis of seven of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime -- from the Whitechapel murders to JonBenet Ramsey -- often contradicting conventional wisdom and legal decisions. Jack the Ripper. Lizzie Borden. The Zodiac Killer. Certain homicide cases maintain an undeniable, almost mystical hold on the public imagination. They touch a nerve deep within us because of the personalities involved, their senseless depravity, the nagging doubts about whether justice was done, or because, in some instances, no suspect has ever been identified or caught. In "The Cases That Haunt Us," twenty-five-year-FBI-veteran John Douglas, profiling pioneer and master of modern criminal investigative analysis, and author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, the team behind the bestselling Mindhunter series, explore the tantalizing mysteries that both their legions of fans and law enforcement professionals ask about most. Among the questions they tackle: Was Jack the Ripper actually the Duke of Clarence, eldest grandson of Queen Victoria, or perhaps a practicing medical doctor? And did highly placed individuals within Scotland Yard have a good idea of the Ripper's identity, which they never revealed? Douglas and Olshaker create a detailed profile of the killer, and reveal their chief suspect. Was Lizzie Borden truly innocent of the murder of her father and stepmother as the Fall River, Massachusetts, jury decided, or was she the one who took the ax and delivered those infamous "whacks"? Through a minute-by-minute behavioral analysis of the crime, the authors come to a convincing conclusion. Did BrunoRichard Hauptmann single-handedly kidnap the baby son of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, the most famous couple in the world, or was he an innocent man caught up and ultimately executed in a relentless rush to judgment in the "crime of the century"? What kind of person could kill six-year-old JonBenet Ramsey on Christmas night in her own home? Douglas was called in on the case shortly after the horrifying murder, and his conclusions are hard-hitting and controversial. Why, in the face of the majority of public, media, and law enforcement opinion, including former FBI colleagues, does Douglas believe that John and Patricia Ramsey did not murder their daughter? And what is the forensic and behavioral evidence he brings to bear to make his claim? Taking a fresh and penetrating look at each case, the authors reexamine and reinterpret accepted facts and victimology using modern profiling and the techniques of criminal analysis developed by Douglas within the FBI. This book deconstructs the evidence and widely held beliefs surrounding each case and rebuilds them -- with fascinating and haunting results.

30 review for The Cases That Haunt Us: From Jack the Ripper to JonBenet Ramsey, the FBI's Legendary Mindhunter Unravels the Mysteries That Won't Go Away

  1. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I enjoyed this, but the author irritated the hell out of me so I can't give it any higher than 2.5 stars.. For one, I believe he should have left out the Ramsey case because he's clearly biased and not playing fair with the reader. Second, he has a fat head, if Douglas could downsize his ego and stop mentioning all of his accomplishments every other paragraph it would make much easier reading! That said, I did like this book. I loved the variety of the cases and that different perspectives were I enjoyed this, but the author irritated the hell out of me so I can't give it any higher than 2.5 stars.. For one, I believe he should have left out the Ramsey case because he's clearly biased and not playing fair with the reader. Second, he has a fat head, if Douglas could downsize his ego and stop mentioning all of his accomplishments every other paragraph it would make much easier reading! That said, I did like this book. I loved the variety of the cases and that different perspectives were presented evenly (other than the Ramsey case as I've said). I also liked that the pictures of the ransom notes and such were included.. Too often in true crime books you get the crappy 'generic bit of dirt outside their house sort of near where they live pictures' haha.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    The Cases That Haunt Us follows Douglas as he explores several unsolved cases through history, ranging from Jack the Ripper, the Black Dahlia to JonBenet Ramsay, using his unique insight into criminal profiling to try and answer the ultimate question: who dunnit? This was an interesting read, helped greatly by Douglas having turned down the personality just enough to present himself as the expert he clearly is without being overbearing during his presentation of the cases. He goes through each on The Cases That Haunt Us follows Douglas as he explores several unsolved cases through history, ranging from Jack the Ripper, the Black Dahlia to JonBenet Ramsay, using his unique insight into criminal profiling to try and answer the ultimate question: who dunnit? This was an interesting read, helped greatly by Douglas having turned down the personality just enough to present himself as the expert he clearly is without being overbearing during his presentation of the cases. He goes through each one methodically and logically, and it’s easy to see where his conclusions lead. A good amount of background knowledge and an obvious flair for writing also help to propel what could otherwise be quite a static book. The chapters also flow together well, starting chronologically at Jack the Ripper and Lizzie Borden, with linking statements in later cases to the behavioural assessments of the former, which was a nice touch. The little additions of past cases from his time working within the FBI to support his theories was also nice to read, and added a level of authenticity to his conclusions. I found the Jack the Ripper case particularly interesting - which surprised me as other than a trip to the London Dungeons I’ve had no interest in the macabre murderer of the Victorian era. However, I thought Douglas was able to provide a detailed and succinct retelling of the facts without diverging too much into the many weird and wonderful theories that surround the brutal killings. In fact, I think this is really where this book appealed to me as it didn’t go off on a tangent and stuck (mainly) to the facts and most reasonable explanations for the crimes. My only real sticking point came with an overall feeling of ‘incompleteness’, which can only come from the cases all remaining unsolved. Obviously this is something that can’t be helped in this case, but I was left with an empty feeling at the lack of closure. A nice addition to the true crime genre, but it still wasn’t as good as Mindhunter.

  3. 4 out of 5

    ``Laurie Henderson

    I have always enjoyed reading books by the famous FBI profiler John Douglas and this book certainly didn't disappoint. Douglas reviews several famous cases, gives his views on them and then profiles several killers who were never caught including Jack the Ripper. Others included the Zodiac Killer and the Lizzie Borden ax murders. (view spoiler)[ He believes the Zodiac committed suicide and this was the reason he had never been caught and yep, Lizzie did her parents in with that axe but was prob I have always enjoyed reading books by the famous FBI profiler John Douglas and this book certainly didn't disappoint. Douglas reviews several famous cases, gives his views on them and then profiles several killers who were never caught including Jack the Ripper. Others included the Zodiac Killer and the Lizzie Borden ax murders. (view spoiler)[ He believes the Zodiac committed suicide and this was the reason he had never been caught and yep, Lizzie did her parents in with that axe but was probably temporarily insane as her parents had provoked her plenty. The infamous Lawrencia Benbenek (run Bambi run) was innocent and framed for the murder of her husband's ex-wife. (hide spoiler)] If you enjoy reading books in the True Crime genre and are interested in famous unsolved cases you should enjoy this book very much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Douglas is one of the first criminal profilers in the country--and he lets you know it. He should have called this one "The Me Me That Me Me." This book is full of statements like "I flew across the country (at my own expense--I had since refused any and all payment for my services) to interview so and so. . " It starts out well, but soon devolves into Douglas patting himself on the back and talking over your head. Douglas is one of the first criminal profilers in the country--and he lets you know it. He should have called this one "The Me Me That Me Me." This book is full of statements like "I flew across the country (at my own expense--I had since refused any and all payment for my services) to interview so and so. . " It starts out well, but soon devolves into Douglas patting himself on the back and talking over your head.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Violent. Provocative. Shocking. Call them what you will...but don't call them open and shut. Did Lizzie Borden murder her own father and stepmother? Was Jack the Ripper actually the Duke of Clarence? Who killed JonBenet Ramsey? America's foremost expert on criminal profiling and twenty-five-year FBI veteran John Douglas, along with author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, explores those tantalizing questions and more in this mesmerizing work of detection. With uniquely gripping analysis, the authors Violent. Provocative. Shocking. Call them what you will...but don't call them open and shut. Did Lizzie Borden murder her own father and stepmother? Was Jack the Ripper actually the Duke of Clarence? Who killed JonBenet Ramsey? America's foremost expert on criminal profiling and twenty-five-year FBI veteran John Douglas, along with author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, explores those tantalizing questions and more in this mesmerizing work of detection. With uniquely gripping analysis, the authors reexamine and reinterpret the accepted facts, evidence, and victimology of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime, including the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, the Zodiac Killer, and the Whitechapel murders. Utilizing techniques developed by Douglas himself, they give detailed profiles and reveal chief suspects in pursuit of what really happened in each case. The Cases That Haunt Us not only offers convincing and controversial conclusions, it deconstructs the evidence and widely held beliefs surrounding each case and rebuilds them -- with fascinating, surprising, and haunting results. It's interesting to learn about the most famous murderers and murders. From Jack the Ripper to JonBenet you get the incite of before and after the murders and the suspects and what the police and such feel about the cases. I enjoyed it a lot.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I'm very hesitant about this book. Although Douglas is a well-respected and almost singularly talented profiler, having read one of his other books I found him to be exceptionally arrogant and dismissive about facts that don't fit into his theories. I would never admit to knowing more about this subject than John Douglas but leaving out evidence has never sat well with me, no matter how revolutionary the man is. But I'm really trying to go into this book with an open mind- I'm especially interes I'm very hesitant about this book. Although Douglas is a well-respected and almost singularly talented profiler, having read one of his other books I found him to be exceptionally arrogant and dismissive about facts that don't fit into his theories. I would never admit to knowing more about this subject than John Douglas but leaving out evidence has never sat well with me, no matter how revolutionary the man is. But I'm really trying to go into this book with an open mind- I'm especially interested in his take on the Jack the Ripper and The Black Dahlia cases.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    John Douglas uses his experience with profiling to give his take on various famous unsolved Crimes such as Jack The Ripper, Lizzie Borden, The Lindburgh Kidnapping, JonBenet Ramsey and The Black Dahlia. He presents the evidence and explains what he believes from it. He debunks some theories with his explanations as to why. It as an interesting book and I like that he supports his reasoning with his FBI experience of profiling crimes. These are cases that likely we will never know the answers to for John Douglas uses his experience with profiling to give his take on various famous unsolved Crimes such as Jack The Ripper, Lizzie Borden, The Lindburgh Kidnapping, JonBenet Ramsey and The Black Dahlia. He presents the evidence and explains what he believes from it. He debunks some theories with his explanations as to why. It as an interesting book and I like that he supports his reasoning with his FBI experience of profiling crimes. These are cases that likely we will never know the answers to for various reasons which he acknowledges, yet they intrigue us and it is fascinating to get his opinions on them along with his reasoning.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    I read this book for the Goodreads' book club: Diversity in All Forms! If you would like to participate in the discussion here is the link: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... "America's foremost expert on criminal profiling and twenty-five-year FBI veteran John Douglas, along with author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, explores those tantalizing questions and more in this mesmerizing work of detection. With uniquely gripping analysis, the authors reexamine and reinterpret the accepted facts, e I read this book for the Goodreads' book club: Diversity in All Forms! If you would like to participate in the discussion here is the link: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... "America's foremost expert on criminal profiling and twenty-five-year FBI veteran John Douglas, along with author and filmmaker Mark Olshaker, explores those tantalizing questions and more in this mesmerizing work of detection. With uniquely gripping analysis, the authors reexamine and reinterpret the accepted facts, evidence, and victimology of the most notorious murder cases in the history of crime, including the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, the Zodiac Killer, and the Whitechapel murders.Utilizing techniques developed by Douglas himself, they give detailed profiles and reveal chief suspects in pursuit of what really happened in each case. The Cases That Haunt Us not only offers convincing and controversial conclusions, it deconstructs the evidence and widely held beliefs surrounding each case and rebuilds them -- with fascinating, surprising, and haunting results."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Robbins

    Famed former FBI profiler John Douglas took a thorough look at several historical cases that have kept people interested for many years, going through victimology and profiling of the UNSUB. I learned many interesting facts about these old cases that I didn’t know and I enjoyed his analysis of the crimes. It was interesting to get the perspective of a profiler on cases that happened long before profiling was a thing. He didn’t have all the answers to solve the crimes, but he had some interesting Famed former FBI profiler John Douglas took a thorough look at several historical cases that have kept people interested for many years, going through victimology and profiling of the UNSUB. I learned many interesting facts about these old cases that I didn’t know and I enjoyed his analysis of the crimes. It was interesting to get the perspective of a profiler on cases that happened long before profiling was a thing. He didn’t have all the answers to solve the crimes, but he had some interesting opinions on what may have happened.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lee Anne

    I don't read true crime like I used to, because I'm older, I have a kid, and reading about sex murders isn't fun any more, and thanks to C.S.I. crap, everybody thinks forensics is cool, and that makes it less cool. But I've read all of John Douglas' books (except the Unabomber one--yawn, and the novel, because who cares?), and this has been in my "to read" pile for years, and I thought it would be a creepy Halloween season read. John Douglas is the inspiration for the Scott Glenn character in Sil I don't read true crime like I used to, because I'm older, I have a kid, and reading about sex murders isn't fun any more, and thanks to C.S.I. crap, everybody thinks forensics is cool, and that makes it less cool. But I've read all of John Douglas' books (except the Unabomber one--yawn, and the novel, because who cares?), and this has been in my "to read" pile for years, and I thought it would be a creepy Halloween season read. John Douglas is the inspiration for the Scott Glenn character in Silence of the Lambs, you know; he pretty much invented the behavior analysis that the F.B.I. uses to profile killers. This book is sort of a true crime greatest hits, in which Douglas takes some of the biggest unsolved (or incorrectly solved) cases of all time and applies his techniques to the evidence, giving the reader his theory as to what kind of person would commit each crime, and why the prevailing myths might be wrong. Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, the Zodiac Killer, the Black Dahlia, the Boston Strangler and more are covered here. The final chapter deals with JonBenet Ramsey, a case in which Douglas briefly served as a paid consultant, and this chapter is the weakest, as Douglas is obviously still defensive about the heat he took for declaring the Ramsey parents innocent. He does make some strong arguments in their favor, though, and I believe him more now than I did at the time. Anyway, this is an entertaining book if you like this sort of thing. Lots of fun to talk about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin Clemence

    “The Cases that Haunt Us” re-evaluates some of the most notorious, unsolved crimes in history, and looks at them with the modern technologies and theories that exist in the 2000’s. Written by John Douglas (former FBI profiler) and his writing partner, Mark Olshaker, this novel delves deep into the world’s most violent and memorable crimes, from Jack the Ripper to The Black Dahlia, The Zodiac and Jon Benet Ramsey, to name a few. Douglas evaluates the cases that everyone is familiar with, introd “The Cases that Haunt Us” re-evaluates some of the most notorious, unsolved crimes in history, and looks at them with the modern technologies and theories that exist in the 2000’s. Written by John Douglas (former FBI profiler) and his writing partner, Mark Olshaker, this novel delves deep into the world’s most violent and memorable crimes, from Jack the Ripper to The Black Dahlia, The Zodiac and Jon Benet Ramsey, to name a few. Douglas evaluates the cases that everyone is familiar with, introducing new information both obtained through modern means and the parts of the crimes that were kept secret by police or authorities. He then analyzes each crime and poses new questions, coming up with alternate suspects and motives that were previously uninvestigated due to lack of knowledge or resources. Douglas does not SOLVE any of the cases, but he definitely looks at them in new ways. Well- written and deeply informative, this novel starts with Jack the Ripper, and moves forward in time. Who were the suspects at the time? What new information have we learned since? This novel is a must for anyone who has a deep interest in the criminal mind, or for anyone who enjoys true crime. Douglas speaks from personal experience in some of these cases, as he had physical involvement in some of them (The Ramsey case being one) . Definitely a novel not for the faint of heart, as some of the details are quite graphic, “The Cases that Haunt Us” provides insight into society’s assumptions, media misrepresentation, and police mismanagement behind some of the world’s most notorious crimes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary JL

    I am starting to find some interest in True Crime as a genre. For years, I have read mystery fiction; now I am becoming interest in real cases as well. The author, a former FBI profiler for over 20 years, has focused on cases that have haunted a lot of us---not haunted as in supernatural---but haunting in their effect on us and the controversies that surround certain cases. I mean, it is over 100 years ago and we are still fascinated by Jack the Ripper. Of course, these are still only the opinions I am starting to find some interest in True Crime as a genre. For years, I have read mystery fiction; now I am becoming interest in real cases as well. The author, a former FBI profiler for over 20 years, has focused on cases that have haunted a lot of us---not haunted as in supernatural---but haunting in their effect on us and the controversies that surround certain cases. I mean, it is over 100 years ago and we are still fascinated by Jack the Ripper. Of course, these are still only the opinions of Mr. Douglas and his co-author. I did not agree with all of his reasoning---but I found his arguments well researched and thought-provoking. He does not solve the cases he selects--but he examines what the current theories are in each cases and supports or refutes them. The segment on Jack the Ripper and the Lindbergh Baby Murder-kidnapping the most interesting segments of the cases profiled. Recommended for fans of true crime; non-fiction and history.

  13. 5 out of 5

    CrabbyPatty

    Famed "Mindhunter" profiler examines famous cases from the past, i.e. Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, Zodiac, etc. There are no answers here, but Douglas offers his thoughts on how to analyze the evidence. I found it interesting that he believed that Borden was guilty, as was Bruno Hauptmann, and that John and Patsy Ramsey had nothing to do with their daughter's death. Famed "Mindhunter" profiler examines famous cases from the past, i.e. Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, Zodiac, etc. There are no answers here, but Douglas offers his thoughts on how to analyze the evidence. I found it interesting that he believed that Borden was guilty, as was Bruno Hauptmann, and that John and Patsy Ramsey had nothing to do with their daughter's death.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Claire- Louise

    I found the Jack the Ripper profiling particularly interesting as well as the Boston Strangler case. This book also offered a new perspective on the murder of poor little Jon Benet, one which I have to say I now agree with.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rennie

    3.5. FBI profiler and inspiration for many a TV and movie character John Douglas examines some of the most infamous unsolved American murders (plus Jack the Ripper) and works his mindhunting magic on them. I liked it because it's much less about him than the Mindhunter book (sorry, but if you're not going to tell tales of driving to Chicago with your cats in the car and your mustache blowing in the wind like Jeffrey L. Rinek I don't want to hear that much about your personal life, stick to the g 3.5. FBI profiler and inspiration for many a TV and movie character John Douglas examines some of the most infamous unsolved American murders (plus Jack the Ripper) and works his mindhunting magic on them. I liked it because it's much less about him than the Mindhunter book (sorry, but if you're not going to tell tales of driving to Chicago with your cats in the car and your mustache blowing in the wind like Jeffrey L. Rinek I don't want to hear that much about your personal life, stick to the ghastly stories we're here for.) (I did take some creative license in imagining what his mustache was doing at that time.) Each section walks through the story of a case - Jack, Lizzie Borden, the Lindbergh kidnapping, the Zodiac, and JonBenet Ramsey, with Black Dahlia and Boston Strangler as quickies. His behavioral and profiling analysis was predictably interesting, even for cases that have already generated discussion and theories ad infinitum. The Black Dahlia one was the least enlightening, I thought, and Lindbergh was really interesting, even having already been schooled on it by a particularly informative Nova episode. With the Zodiac he made me see why people go nuts trying to figure that one out. He also gives the most unintentionally hilarious description of that paper bag hat costume with the clip-on sunglasses. I know this is a murderer and he took someone's life while wearing it and that is unbelievably horrible, but in case you haven't considered the breakdown of that costume, it is just so so ridiculous. And did you know that he wrote a ton more "This is the Zodiac speaking" letters, not just the two or so that always get quoted? And that he wanted people in San Francisco to wear Zodiac buttons and got really fussy when the police didn't pass that request along? I did learn a lot from this book. But then John Douglas becomes that bored lady in your office who can't resist gossiping even though she's been told to knock it off so as a compromise she withholds one little identifying bit. He gives details of a few possible suspects in some of the cases, like someone who claimed his bloody knife was from killing chickens on the day of the aforementioned clip-on sunglasses attack, but he doesn't name names or really go into enough detail. Which, fine - these people weren't tried and convicted so what can you do, but still. It's unsatisfying somehow. And the bulk of each chapter is recounting the crimes and key details, which are interesting if you're not already familiar with them and less so if you are. Sometimes his expert analysis is just a quick couple of pages. I thought it was still worthwhile, but maybe only if you haven't read a ton of other material on any of the cases involved. And then there's JonBenet. I'm not exactly clear what his involvement was, he's transparent that he was paid for his work there, but it didn't seem from my reading that it was at the Ramseys' behest, yet elsewhere it seems they WERE the ones who paid him? I don't really know. Regardless, I see his points in favor of the intruder theory and cutting the Ramseys a break here and there (still thin compared to the alternative) but I just don't buy it, and he seems to have a vested interest in asserting they had absolutely nothing to do with it. And at this point it kind of seems like just about everyone everywhere agrees that they had at least SOMETHING to do with it even if it was an accident? He contradicts himself a little bit here and it has a someone dost protest too much feeling. I do think he knows that of which he speaks for the most part but this one is mighty suspicious. Interesting enough but it did read like he was holding back on some of these, and I'm sure sometimes he had to. I like his idea of a traveling interdisciplinary investigatory expert supersquad though. We should do that instead of Space Force.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I was hoping for a little more opinion on some of these cases (especially the Lizzie Bordon case). I was already familiar with the majority of the cases, but it turns out there was a lot about the Lindbergh case I didn't know. There was a small chapter that briefly deals with a few crimes where Douglas suspects the real killer hasn't been caught. He mentions the Boston Strangler, for with Albert DeSalvo confessed, but based on the crimes he was committing after the murders (rapes) it does seem u I was hoping for a little more opinion on some of these cases (especially the Lizzie Bordon case). I was already familiar with the majority of the cases, but it turns out there was a lot about the Lindbergh case I didn't know. There was a small chapter that briefly deals with a few crimes where Douglas suspects the real killer hasn't been caught. He mentions the Boston Strangler, for with Albert DeSalvo confessed, but based on the crimes he was committing after the murders (rapes) it does seem unlikely that he could have de-escalated his crimes. And although I use to assume that Laurie Bembenek (Run Bambi Run) was guilty, I now think that the evidence against was not enough to have her prosecuted. The book was written in 2000, so when Douglas gets to the section about the JonBenet Ramsey murders, the theory that her brother might have accidentally killed her wasn't mentioned. It's clear Douglas thinks the parents are innocent, and he definitely brings up some good points about how, based on the evidence, it makes sense that there was an intruder. I'm still not sure what to think about the crime, but obviously that's what makes it so compelling. Unsolved murders aren't really my thing- although I am interested in True Crime, my anxiety usually requires the killers to have been caught. Most of these cases are decades old- Jack the Ripper, The Black Dahlia, Lizzie Border, the Lindbergh Baby- and in those cases there's not much Douglas can really add other than the facts and even some of those are questionable. Overall this was an interesting read of famous, unsolved cases. It wasn't a huge page turner- I've been reading it in bits and bursts for several weeks- but I'm glad I finished it!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    John Douglas puts his FBI profiling skills to work on several cases, ranging from the Jack the Ripper murders to JonBenet Ramsey's death. Lots of detail here as he walks the reader through how a criminal profiler approaches a case. He generally presents the facts as they were known at the time, as well as touching on how our understanding of those facts may have changed over time. Once he has covered the case in detail, he presents how he would have worked each case, methods he might have utiliz John Douglas puts his FBI profiling skills to work on several cases, ranging from the Jack the Ripper murders to JonBenet Ramsey's death. Lots of detail here as he walks the reader through how a criminal profiler approaches a case. He generally presents the facts as they were known at the time, as well as touching on how our understanding of those facts may have changed over time. Once he has covered the case in detail, he presents how he would have worked each case, methods he might have utilized to flush out each killer, and a brief profile of what characteristics he would have been looking for in the perpetrator of each case. Enlightening reading, with a lot of details the general public may not have been aware of.

  18. 4 out of 5

    jamez

    I love a good mystery, even more so when it is focused on real life events. I read this book years ago and keep having my mind focus back to it. Gruesome and sad stories make you ponder why another human being would be guilty of such a terrible crime. Spooky and eerie, I recommend this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    A very interesting book, with enough information and tantalizing clues to stimulate any armchair detective. My second time of reading, and I find it just as fascinating as the first time around.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen)

    3 Stars I know this is a niche read, but I actually have a lot of thoughts so RTC for the first time in like a year.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Every true crime nerd has heard of these infamous unsolved cases: Lizzie Borden, JeanBenet Ramsey, the Zodiac, Black Dahlia, and Jack the Ripper. These cases and more that are in the book captivated the minds of the world not only at the time of their occurrence but decades and even centuries later. There is a desperate thirst for truth. A thirst that Douglas warns to be wary to quench. This book is as brilliant and well put together as any other he has written. If you liked Mindhunter and The Every true crime nerd has heard of these infamous unsolved cases: Lizzie Borden, JeanBenet Ramsey, the Zodiac, Black Dahlia, and Jack the Ripper. These cases and more that are in the book captivated the minds of the world not only at the time of their occurrence but decades and even centuries later. There is a desperate thirst for truth. A thirst that Douglas warns to be wary to quench. This book is as brilliant and well put together as any other he has written. If you liked Mindhunter and The Killer Across the Table you will enjoy this work as well. Coming out between the release of those two works, it doesn't differ in message but only in experience he has had on the job. Despite what opinions you may have on the effectiveness of criminal profiling, his presentation of the facts of the case are unemotional, blunt, and relevant. Unlike a lot of sources which cloud the facts of cases with incorrect assumptions put out by media fiends, he presents what is known to have happened. If there is dispute over facts, he says so. I myself do not agree with his assessment in some areas, but he clearly differentiates the sections that are fact from opinion. He also directly addresses criticisms of his assessments so readers can more fully understand why something he said in an earlier work may not apply to this new case even though the two superficially look similar. Ultimately, if you have a lover of true crime cases, especially unsolved ones, this is a must read. For someone who knows little to nothing about true crime, this is an easy to follow "who's who" of unsolved cases that are often referenced along with an easily digestible presentation of the timeline, events, and characters involved. For the experienced true crime reader, it presents a challenge to your likely already well established theory you've repeatedly only 1000 times to everyone who will listen (or cared about you enough to pretend) through evidence your favorite podcast likely left out.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I read this some time ago...after my "true crime" period. Occasionally something will click and I'll look up a book on a given subject. Douglas was an FBI Special Agent and one of the earliest criminal profilers. Here he takes a look at several "interesting" high profile cases from the past and (the book's) present. The Zodiac Killer (a case never solved), The Black Dalia (also never solved), Bambi Bembenek (accused of murder, escaped, recaptured and awarded a new trial. She finally agreed to pl I read this some time ago...after my "true crime" period. Occasionally something will click and I'll look up a book on a given subject. Douglas was an FBI Special Agent and one of the earliest criminal profilers. Here he takes a look at several "interesting" high profile cases from the past and (the book's) present. The Zodiac Killer (a case never solved), The Black Dalia (also never solved), Bambi Bembenek (accused of murder, escaped, recaptured and awarded a new trial. She finally agreed to plead to a lesser charge for a sentence of "time served" and was freed), The Boston Strangler (Albert DeSalvo condemned but now there are questions as to his guilt), and the JonBenét Ramsey case. He also looks at Jack the Ripper, the Lindbergh kidnapping, and Lizzie Borden (who no one ever seems to remember was found not guilty...though Mr. Douglas seems as if he might disagree with that verdict). I found this an interesting even absorbing book. If it's a topic your interested in you might try it. For what it is I recommend it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katherine "Kj" Joslin

    It was a great review of a few high profile cases. John Douglas is clearly a smart and confident profiler HOWEVER .... the self-stroking in his books is more than a little annoying. I enjoy him pointing out where other law enforcement officers took a different approach but it comes with an exhale of hot air as he pats himself on the back for his "superior ideas." This behavior is far less prevalent in this book (until you get to the Jon-Benet Ramsey chapters) than in his other books, perhaps bec It was a great review of a few high profile cases. John Douglas is clearly a smart and confident profiler HOWEVER .... the self-stroking in his books is more than a little annoying. I enjoy him pointing out where other law enforcement officers took a different approach but it comes with an exhale of hot air as he pats himself on the back for his "superior ideas." This behavior is far less prevalent in this book (until you get to the Jon-Benet Ramsey chapters) than in his other books, perhaps because he had a co-author. As for the remaining cases there was a TON of information that seems to get lost in other books that only "touch" on the crimes so the book was worth it overall.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fishface

    To me this was just a rehash of a bunch of old cases I've heard about a million times, with no new or special insight into them. To me this was just a rehash of a bunch of old cases I've heard about a million times, with no new or special insight into them.

  25. 4 out of 5

    berthamason

    John E. Douglas never disappoints me, though I must say that the chapter on the Zodiac was a little bit weak.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sydney

    This is my first book by the famous John E. Douglas and I have all the rest on my TBR list! The author has a unique insight into victimology and criminal profiling, leaving no stone unturned in each case that is discussed. Most, if not all, of the cases in this book are very high-profile, but I still learned facts that I didn’t know previously! These are unsolved cases so of course there’s a feeling of frustration or incompleteness at the end of each chapter, however Douglas provides an analysis This is my first book by the famous John E. Douglas and I have all the rest on my TBR list! The author has a unique insight into victimology and criminal profiling, leaving no stone unturned in each case that is discussed. Most, if not all, of the cases in this book are very high-profile, but I still learned facts that I didn’t know previously! These are unsolved cases so of course there’s a feeling of frustration or incompleteness at the end of each chapter, however Douglas provides an analysis and final perspective of what happened after giving all the facts. Fascinating, shocking, and violent, I would recommend this to anyone with an interest in true crime that wants an in-depth look at cases such as the Zodiac Killer, Lizzie Borden, and JonBenet Ramsey.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura Peden

    Although all the cases discussed are well known, what sets this book apart from others is the dissection & interpretation done by the Mindhunter himself, John Douglas. The cases that are examined are: Jack the Ripper Lizzie Borden The Lindbergh Kidnapping The Zodiac Black Dahlia Lawrencia Ann "Bambi" Bembenek The Boston Strangler JonBonet Ramsey This list is in order told, leaving the most fascinating for last with JonBonet. Douglas worked on this case so there’s a much deeper dive into that one. High Although all the cases discussed are well known, what sets this book apart from others is the dissection & interpretation done by the Mindhunter himself, John Douglas. The cases that are examined are: Jack the Ripper Lizzie Borden The Lindbergh Kidnapping The Zodiac Black Dahlia Lawrencia Ann "Bambi" Bembenek The Boston Strangler JonBonet Ramsey This list is in order told, leaving the most fascinating for last with JonBonet. Douglas worked on this case so there’s a much deeper dive into that one. Highly recommend this Audible Plus title for true crime fans.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    I thought I had finished this years ago but then remembered I actually hadn't with one chapter to go (arguably the worst chapter in the book as Douglas is extremely biased regarding the JonBenet Ramsay case). That said, this is still a pretty decent book focusing on different unsolved cases. I thought I had finished this years ago but then remembered I actually hadn't with one chapter to go (arguably the worst chapter in the book as Douglas is extremely biased regarding the JonBenet Ramsay case). That said, this is still a pretty decent book focusing on different unsolved cases.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aya Hamouda

    That Was a really good Start for The Summer Vacation..

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Buzzard

    2.5 Ugh. I feel tired after reading this. Just something about the way this was written felt like such a slog to get through. Unfortunate, because it was an interesting topic. This one was a workout though 💀

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.