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It's the bloody return of one of Thor's greatest enemies: Malekith the Accursed! The former lord of the Dark Elves is freed from his otherworldly prison, and the chase is on across the Nine Realms to capture him! As Malekith begins a bloody rampage, Thor finds new allies to aid him: a Dark Elf sorceress! A gun-toting Light Elf! A gargantuan Mountain Giant! A dwarf who love It's the bloody return of one of Thor's greatest enemies: Malekith the Accursed! The former lord of the Dark Elves is freed from his otherworldly prison, and the chase is on across the Nine Realms to capture him! As Malekith begins a bloody rampage, Thor finds new allies to aid him: a Dark Elf sorceress! A gun-toting Light Elf! A gargantuan Mountain Giant! A dwarf who loves dynamite! And a particularly surly troll...?! The Wild Hunt has begun! Plus: Thor returns to Midgard - but what does it mean to walk the Earth as a god? Where does Thor go and who does he see when he's not out saving the world with the Avengers? It's the return of Thor's long-time love interest, Dr. Jane Foster! Collecting: Thor: God of Thunder 12-18


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It's the bloody return of one of Thor's greatest enemies: Malekith the Accursed! The former lord of the Dark Elves is freed from his otherworldly prison, and the chase is on across the Nine Realms to capture him! As Malekith begins a bloody rampage, Thor finds new allies to aid him: a Dark Elf sorceress! A gun-toting Light Elf! A gargantuan Mountain Giant! A dwarf who love It's the bloody return of one of Thor's greatest enemies: Malekith the Accursed! The former lord of the Dark Elves is freed from his otherworldly prison, and the chase is on across the Nine Realms to capture him! As Malekith begins a bloody rampage, Thor finds new allies to aid him: a Dark Elf sorceress! A gun-toting Light Elf! A gargantuan Mountain Giant! A dwarf who loves dynamite! And a particularly surly troll...?! The Wild Hunt has begun! Plus: Thor returns to Midgard - but what does it mean to walk the Earth as a god? Where does Thor go and who does he see when he's not out saving the world with the Avengers? It's the return of Thor's long-time love interest, Dr. Jane Foster! Collecting: Thor: God of Thunder 12-18

30 review for Thor: God of Thunder, Volume 3: The Accursed

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    Disney Takes Over How do you follow up the ultimate Thor story? The cosmic scope of the spectacular two-parter that was The God Butcher and Godbomb obviously cannot be topped, so the one shot that opens this third volume wisely shifts gears to tell a much more low key story. Gone are the ambitious meditations on the changing status of religion, gone the travels though time, gone the sweeping landscapes and epic battles. Instead, the reader is invited to sneak a peek at Thor’s personal and surpris Disney Takes Over How do you follow up the ultimate Thor story? The cosmic scope of the spectacular two-parter that was The God Butcher and Godbomb obviously cannot be topped, so the one shot that opens this third volume wisely shifts gears to tell a much more low key story. Gone are the ambitious meditations on the changing status of religion, gone the travels though time, gone the sweeping landscapes and epic battles. Instead, the reader is invited to sneak a peek at Thor’s personal and surprisingly quiet interactions with various people whose problems cannot be solved with a giant hammer. Yet while the change of pace in theory certainly makes sense, I did not find the actual results quite as charming and touching as I was supposed to. The real problems, however, start with the main storyline that follows - by far the weakest Jason Aaron story I have come across so far. It feels forced and out of place, as if Aaron reluctantly phoned it in at Disney's misguided request to superficially link the series to the awful Thor: The Dark World movie. The reintroduction of the generic villain Malekith (that coincides with the character’s appearance in the movie) appears arbitrary to say the least, the fantasy plot and its characters underdeveloped. Ron Garney’s artwork, though not bad when compared to your average superhero comic book, also looks rather pedestrian next to the scope and grandeur Esad Ribic established in the first two volumes. To make things worse, "The Accursed" contains dangerously naïve overtones of America’s recent military operations. We are introduced to a society of so-called dark elves who are portrayed as notoriously incapable of self-rule, and who are thus in desperate need of Thor's divine intervention. When this intervention - due to the dark elves' "unteachable nature" - does not show the desired results, Thor nevertheless receives reassurance that he has done the right thing for all the right reasons: “You saved lives, Thunder God. Do not doubt that. You ended the bloodshed... If there is ever a lasting peace made between the realms, they may say that it began here, with us. With you.” It is the kind of fictional justification for hawkish militarism gone haywire you'd expect from Disney but not from Jason Aaron. So why did I still cough up a second star for this book? Well, it concludes with a second one shot, and this one – illustrated by Das Pastoras in suitably gritty yet colorful fashion – marks a surprising return to form for the title. Battling a devastating hangover and covered in vomit, the young, Viking Age Thor comes to his senses in the mouth of a befriended dragon, desperately trying to recount the events of the previous day. It is a funny and ultimately touching story that ties into some of the themes of the previous volumes - here's hoping it also sets up a return to these themes in the next volume!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 stars Thor in Asgard just isn't my thing. It's a personal preference, it has nothing to do with the writing, and I don't mean to offend Sesana and her mighty hammer anyone who enjoys these stories. Mostly, I just find Asgard stories depressing. They have an air of hopelessness to them that just sucks all the joy out of my day. So. I think I'll stick to the MIGHTY-AVENGER-THOR stories, from here on out. This wasn't an awful story, by any means, and I certainly enjoyed it better than that stupid God 3.5 stars Thor in Asgard just isn't my thing. It's a personal preference, it has nothing to do with the writing, and I don't mean to offend Sesana and her mighty hammer anyone who enjoys these stories. Mostly, I just find Asgard stories depressing. They have an air of hopelessness to them that just sucks all the joy out of my day. So. I think I'll stick to the MIGHTY-AVENGER-THOR stories, from here on out. This wasn't an awful story, by any means, and I certainly enjoyed it better than that stupid God-Bomb storyline. If you liked the God-Bomb story, GREAT! I didn't. I have to say, Malekith the Accursed was a fucking scary-as-hell villain, though! The Dark Elves are such a bunch of freaks, but somehow the ending still caught me by surprise. Very well done, Mr. Arron! All of the little one-shot stories in the beginning are pretty good, and there's another one that was nicely done albeit depressing! at the end. I guess I just prefer my helping of Thor...with a side of Iron Man and Captain America. Sorry, guys. Anne's Ridiculous Pet Peeve: Ok. This has nothing to do with the story, but why do they have to always use that stupid font when Thor talks? He's a Norse god. I get it! Stop with the weird lettering already!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Thor may be the God of Thunder but Jason Aaron is the God of the One-Shot Comic! His day in the life of Doop was arguably the best comic in his Wolverine and the X-Men series, and his Wolverine’s week issue (I forget which series) was so damn good – it looked at how Wolverine was able to be a part of the many superhero teams he’s a member of, like the Doop issue, in a comedic way. And then there was his brief stint at DC before he joined Marvel and became one of the Marvel Architects, when he di Thor may be the God of Thunder but Jason Aaron is the God of the One-Shot Comic! His day in the life of Doop was arguably the best comic in his Wolverine and the X-Men series, and his Wolverine’s week issue (I forget which series) was so damn good – it looked at how Wolverine was able to be a part of the many superhero teams he’s a member of, like the Doop issue, in a comedic way. And then there was his brief stint at DC before he joined Marvel and became one of the Marvel Architects, when he did a Penguin one-shot which Gregg Hurwitz used as the foundation for his excellent Penguin mini-series, Pain and Prejudice. Aaron did in one issue what Hurwitz took five issues to do – Aaron’s issue is included in the back of the Pain and Prejudice trade paperback, though both writers’ stories are worth reading. So we come to Thor, Volume 3: The Accursed which has two of Aaron’s signature one-shots bookending it, Thor #12: Once Upon a Time in Midgard and #18: Days of Wine and Dragons – and both are outstanding! Thor #12 is a day in the life of present-day Thor where he drinks mead at a New York dive bar, visits a prisoner on death row and gives him a rare final meal, brings food to the street children of Brazil, helps out some nuns, visits a monk in the Himalayas, and too many other cool things to list. Remember a while back when a marine posted a video on Youtube asking Justin Timberlake to go to her graduation ball as her date? Thor does something similar for a SHIELD graduate. This is why people like Thor! But the highlight was visiting his ex, Jane Foster, who’s with someone else – a non-superhero man – and is going through cancer treatment. Aaron effortlessly writes their scenes so well that within a single panel you instantly believe their years of history, and Jane gets some great lines that make me wish Aaron were scripting the Thor movies. Thor #18 stars young Thor back in the days of Vikings getting plastered with a talking dragon called Skabgagg. It’s basically a comedy issue with an ending that shows the young Thor growing up a bit. It has my favourite exchange of the book where Thor and Skabgagg are explaining themselves to the female Vikings – both are badly hungover and Thor woke up in the dragon’s mouth covered in vomit (some of it his own). (Thor and Skabgagg fought trolls and of course won): Thor: Afterward... we discovered their stockpile of grog. Enough rancid liquor to fill a swamp. I thought it smelled of rotting horse. But the dragon dared me to drink it. Skabgagg: Yes. And then you wouldn't stop. Thor: What about YOU? You gulped that swill by the barrelful. And then blew FIRE at me, I seem to recall. Skabgagg: Was that before or after your buried your axe in my FACE? Thor: I woke up inside your MOUTH you foul...! Days of Wine and Dragons indeed! The whole issue is full of great stuff like that. The main story of the book features the villain of the most recent Thor movie, Malekith the Dark Elf, who is (as is always the case) far more interesting in the comics than his bland cinematic depiction would have you believe. He’s set free by some followers and begins a civil war amongst his people. Standing in for a kind of fantasy UN peacekeeping force, Thor forms the League of Realms which includes the delightfully named Sir Ivory Honeyshot of the Light Elves, Screwbeard the dynamite dwarf, a giant, a Dark Elf sorceress and a troll. The Accursed isn’t a bad storyline but it’s your fairly standard “heroes chasing the villain” plot. Occasionally they meet up, they fight, they continue the chase, and so on until they defeat Malekith (though to Aaron’s credit the ending has an unexpected twist). It has some nice moments but it was a very easy story to put down. They are pretty good moments though, like when Thor takes his League to a pub to get drunk in a team-building exercise (ingenious!), and Thor even pulls off a trick worthy of Loki, showing off his oft-underplayed cunning and intelligence. There was also a genuine belly-laugh scene between the dynamite dwarf and the troll when the dwarf lights a stick of dynamite then gets it stuck to his hand – the troll chops off the dwarf’s hand and saves his life, though as Screwbeard says “Stupid troll! You could’ve cut fuse not me!” Ron Garney’s wonderful art sells the joke, and then later when they’re yelling out their battlecries – “For Alfheim!” etc. – the dwarf yells “For my hand!” Brilliant! That’s why I read Jason Aaron’s Marvel comics – he really is the funniest writer they have. I haven’t loved Aaron’s Thor as much as many other readers but I think that’s down to The God Butcher storyline which took up the first two volumes – the third is a lot more fun and enjoyable a book and finally won me over to the series. I wouldn’t say it’s one of Aaron’s best books – I’m comparing this to Scalped and his Wolverine and the X-Men run, both of which are superb – but despite not being as consistently good a read as I’d hoped, it’s definitely his best Thor book so far. It’s certainly worth checking out for the one-shots alone. 3.5 stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    What a let down! What the fuck happened? God Butcher and God Bomb were absolutely perfect. This is like the Phantom Menace trying to follow Return of the Jedi. And the artwork. Why the hell would they ever stray from Esad Ribic? Don't get me wrong, the art isn't bad, but it sure isn't Ribic. There is a lot of disappointment here. The first and last issues are total throwaways. In the first, Thor returns to all his realms and planets to party. He dances with an environmental scientist who makes a What a let down! What the fuck happened? God Butcher and God Bomb were absolutely perfect. This is like the Phantom Menace trying to follow Return of the Jedi. And the artwork. Why the hell would they ever stray from Esad Ribic? Don't get me wrong, the art isn't bad, but it sure isn't Ribic. There is a lot of disappointment here. The first and last issues are total throwaways. In the first, Thor returns to all his realms and planets to party. He dances with an environmental scientist who makes a global warming PSA. In the last, Thor parties with a dragon, the dragon and his daddy argue, the dragon fucks up the she-viking village, and Thor kills the dragon. Who cares. So in the previous two volumes Thor was fighting Gorrh, probably one of the best and grandest villains I've ever read because of his reach over the entire universe. Here Thor is fighting Malekith the Accursed (who?), who is committing genocide on his own people on one realm, which I guess is like a small planet. Not one solar system, not one universe or even multiverse. Just one forest realm. For some reason all the realms are interested and send a very Tolkien group of misfits to kill Malekith. Again, who cares. The Malekith plot makes little sense to me. Forgiving the premise that the realms should even care about Malekith, the League pops in and out of villages trying to catch him and narrowly miss him every time, allowing plenty of dark elves to have their heads lobbed off and making the League look very stupid. Blah blah blah, Malekith stands with the Frost Giants, and the League can't cross a line in the sand because it will start war. Blah blah blah, the League goes to Midgard, where the dark elves are having a sword fighting Senate hearing in a butcher shop basement, Malekith shows up and everyone fights. A giant worm comes out of Thor, (view spoiler)[turns out he's the "bugged" (get it?) traitor and Ud the Troll wasn't actually killed, who cares, (hide spoiler)] and the dark elves decide to work together and elect a new king before anyone else is killed. Now here's the part I fucking hate. (view spoiler)[They elect god damn Malekith, the dark elf who has been killing everyone, to be the king. And Lady Waziria, whose arm was cut off and family killed by Malekith, goes to Hel and the spider/snake prison as his royal proxy?!! Then Thor talks about how this is bullshit and there's going to be war. And other reviewers made connections to the American wars in the Middle East and that Thor is empowering the enemy, which I can totally see. And if that's the case that's just terrible writing for a Thor comic. (hide spoiler)] So the ending basically nullifies the entire point of this story arc. They go in to get the bad guy, chase him, catch him, and we basically get the Revenge of the Sith ending where nothing happens like it should. UGH! Jason Aaron, why?!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    It seems inevitable that Malekith would have to make a return to the Thor comics. He was, after all, the villain of the second Thor movie, and you might as well give new readers what they expect to see. Especially with Loki as villain seemingly off limits, at least for the time being. This particular Malekith story... Well, it's ok. It's a pretty standard "heroes chase the villain" story, with a few enhancements to keep it a cut above average. For one, Malekith is a particularly vicious and thre It seems inevitable that Malekith would have to make a return to the Thor comics. He was, after all, the villain of the second Thor movie, and you might as well give new readers what they expect to see. Especially with Loki as villain seemingly off limits, at least for the time being. This particular Malekith story... Well, it's ok. It's a pretty standard "heroes chase the villain" story, with a few enhancements to keep it a cut above average. For one, Malekith is a particularly vicious and threatening villain, and I find his brutality to be believable. It didn't feel like he was being evil for the sake of it, in other words. The band of heroes is actually pretty damn entertaining, and the ending was quite a surprise without being completely and entirely out of nowhere. In all, good, but not terribly exciting. Luckily, there's more to the book than that. The volume starts with a sort of day-in-the-life of Thor. Which, for him, includes things like bringing a rare gift to a condemned man, offers aid to nuns, and generally does the sort of thing that you'd expect an actual, literal god like Thor who really answers prayers to do. And then he visits Jane Foster. This is one of the best scenes in the book, with Jane and Thor as exes who still like, respect, and genuinely love each other, despite having put their romance in the past. The last issue is another Young Thor tale, before he was worthy of Mjolnir. It starts out as a light-hearted buddy comedy with Thor and his good friend, the dragon, and turns into another moment that would separate young, unworthy Thor from the older, worthy Thor. Doesn't sound like much on the surface, I know, but it's the execution that makes it. And I kind of like seeing the younger Thor, now and then. The main story in this trade is just a cut or two above average, but the extra stories really make the entire collection worth reading. Not quite as good as the first two volumes, but still better than average as a whole.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    OK...that was disappointing. Even more so because it's Jason Aaron... The first issue #12? That was a 5 star issue. It made me get all teary eyed, and was good solid stuff about a God who loves humans, yet still cannot always save them. Following on the heels of the God Butcher saga, this was a perfect approach to a more small scale and human approach to Thor. I loved everything about this issue. It also involves all 3 Thors at different points in history, showing the love he has always held for OK...that was disappointing. Even more so because it's Jason Aaron... The first issue #12? That was a 5 star issue. It made me get all teary eyed, and was good solid stuff about a God who loves humans, yet still cannot always save them. Following on the heels of the God Butcher saga, this was a perfect approach to a more small scale and human approach to Thor. I loved everything about this issue. It also involves all 3 Thors at different points in history, showing the love he has always held for Midgard. the rest of the book is a sorta LOTR gang from the 9 realms who try to hunt down Malekith, who escapes from Hel. Just a little too obvious until the end, but the ending was actually well done and sets up what will surely return as a bigger storyline down the road. the final issue goes back to young Thor and is funny, but also shows him growing as a young God, learning about life and responsibility, alongside a drunken dragon. Yup. Thor and a dragon get shitfaced together....that's the funny part. So not amazing, good, but the middle lags a bit and is kinda boring. If anything, get your hands on issue #12, because that's the diamond of this collection, and one of the best Thor issues I've ever read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    A good volume. Featuring Malekith the dark Elf, who is a formidable opponent for our hero. Some good stuff in here. 3.5 stars right now, might go up on consideration.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ugh, Malekith. Uninspired villain, resurrected from some ancient line of Thor stories after he got a starring role in the second Thor movie. As if that suddenly makes him cool. At least we got a neat little interlude story, a palate cleanser (are they a Proctor & Gamble product? They should make them, in disposable form - maybe even something you could plug into the wall and make it always smell of clean palate in your home). I'm sure after murdering a few thousand gods, even Jason Aaron - king Ugh, Malekith. Uninspired villain, resurrected from some ancient line of Thor stories after he got a starring role in the second Thor movie. As if that suddenly makes him cool. At least we got a neat little interlude story, a palate cleanser (are they a Proctor & Gamble product? They should make them, in disposable form - maybe even something you could plug into the wall and make it always smell of clean palate in your home). I'm sure after murdering a few thousand gods, even Jason Aaron - king of depressing stories - was in need of a little kitten time. Ron Garney makes some pretty pretty pictures. Especially his map of the Nine Realms. But also his sinister Malekith, the great beasts of war and the fantasy scenery. (Like a toned-down Frazetta - only with minimal boobage.) Then all of a sudden Aaron and Garney unleash the League of Realms on this story, and it becomes Super Fun Times in the Nine Realms. When Aaron decides to bring his sense of humour to the party, I always enjoy his stories. (Well, I always enjoy his stories anyway, but just a little more when they're this fun.) Not to mention Aaron brings some kick-ass women to the fight. Yeah. *changes undies preventatively* God DAMN it seems like Aaron has fun writing this kind of adventure. Hell, even his *letters* column responses are silly. How does someone get a job like this? I would love to have as much fun as this looks in my job. Instead I push paper and apply paper cuts to political battles. Some days it's a blast - I get to laugh at the absurdity and sometimes watch someone actually take my advice despite their better judgment. The best days are ones that end with a beer among workmates or I get to go home without raising my voice and being a bastard to someone. The worst days do *not* include getting vomit on you (so I've got that much on you, dripping Thor).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    3.75 stars This is still a good series. The best Thor series I have ever read. I love this new interpretation of Thor as a really nice guy. While this was a good volume, it still pales in comparison to the first two volumes containing the God Butcher storyline. It would be almost impossible not to, especially with the new plot. So basically, present-day Thor goes back to Midgard and Asgardia and chills there. Until Malekith the Accursed breaks out of his prison and goes on a murdering rampage agai 3.75 stars This is still a good series. The best Thor series I have ever read. I love this new interpretation of Thor as a really nice guy. While this was a good volume, it still pales in comparison to the first two volumes containing the God Butcher storyline. It would be almost impossible not to, especially with the new plot. So basically, present-day Thor goes back to Midgard and Asgardia and chills there. Until Malekith the Accursed breaks out of his prison and goes on a murdering rampage against the dark elves, his own people. The council of the realms decides to form a sort of all-star group from all the races in the council. Thor is obviously in it, followed by a dark and light elf, a troll, a dwarf, and a giant. So they set off to stop Malekith. That's basically the premise of this, and at the end (view spoiler)[ the dark elves choose Malekith as their king. Bummer. (hide spoiler)] I will continue this series because there is only one more volume. It's totally understandable that this volume isn't as good as the first two because I was incredibly impressed with the God Butcher. Either way, this volume is worth giving a shot.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Not bad, but nowhere near as good as the previous two volumes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    Malekith the Accursed has escaped his prison and is causing havok among his own people, the Dark Elves. All-Mother Freyja assigns Thor as leader of a motley team named the League of Realms that must face Malekith. Thor's team isn't very unified as each member believes he can best Malekith alone. Their first battle with the Dark Elf goes badly when the elven queen is killed. Thor must seed some camaraderie between them or risk a conflict between all the realms which would make them easy pickings f Malekith the Accursed has escaped his prison and is causing havok among his own people, the Dark Elves. All-Mother Freyja assigns Thor as leader of a motley team named the League of Realms that must face Malekith. Thor's team isn't very unified as each member believes he can best Malekith alone. Their first battle with the Dark Elf goes badly when the elven queen is killed. Thor must seed some camaraderie between them or risk a conflict between all the realms which would make them easy pickings for Malekith. (view spoiler)[Their next battle has Malekith reveal his new allies, the feared Frost Giants. Thor's group is forced to stay back lest they be accused of trespassing the the Frost Giant realm which would lead to all-out war with them. Thor loses one member to Melekith and later accuse another of betraying them. The latter is killed by Thor himself and the League of Realms disbands. It's later revealed that Thor was being controled by a creature placed in his body by one of Malekith's dark elves. Weak twist. That is until Thor reveals an impressive ruse that fools Malekith who now has to face the complete League of Realms once again. The biggest twist is when, to end the conflict, the council of Dark Elves decides to elect Malekith as king. Thor is convinced a major conflict is coming. (hide spoiler)]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Subham

    This was quite a fun volume. It starts off with the release of Malekith and the formation of the league of realms and they hunt for him and there are constant battles and all until we find Thor in some twists and precarious positions and he confronts Malekith finally until we see the nature of Dark Elves and what their tribe has done for him now. This was a good one and has a great twist that sets him and War of the realms perfectly. It was good to see this league and the politics within and som This was quite a fun volume. It starts off with the release of Malekith and the formation of the league of realms and they hunt for him and there are constant battles and all until we find Thor in some twists and precarious positions and he confronts Malekith finally until we see the nature of Dark Elves and what their tribe has done for him now. This was a good one and has a great twist that sets him and War of the realms perfectly. It was good to see this league and the politics within and some cool characters and finally the last story about a young Thor and when he had hunt down Skabgagg a dragon and the whole weird time in that era. A good fun read as it progresses the story forward and the art as usual is good. One of the better Thor volumes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    An Ancient Enemy Awakes 23 July 2016 - Singapore It had been a while since I had visited a comic book shop, and since one of the things I do, other than reading books and writing reviews on them, is to visit businesses, buy something, and write reviews on them, I decided that it was about time to visit some of the comic book shops scattered about Melbourne. Also, I wanted something short, and engaging, to read on the plane as I made my way across the continents, and a graphic novel certainly does An Ancient Enemy Awakes 23 July 2016 - Singapore It had been a while since I had visited a comic book shop, and since one of the things I do, other than reading books and writing reviews on them, is to visit businesses, buy something, and write reviews on them, I decided that it was about time to visit some of the comic book shops scattered about Melbourne. Also, I wanted something short, and engaging, to read on the plane as I made my way across the continents, and a graphic novel certainly does the trick. Mind you, I do have a heap of other books with me as well, which I also plan on reading, so my travels will not be made up of simply reading about the antics of a bunch of superheroes. Mind you, I have been rewatching the Marvel Cinematic Universe films and also had a sudden urge to rush out and buy some comics based on the characters in the said films, and one of them, obviously, was Thor. It seems as if this series is a newer series though because this is the third graphic novel and I suspect that Thor has been around for a lot longer (the comic book character, not the Norse God) than just three graphic novels, particularly since he is a founding member of the Avengers. Actually, as I was perusing Wikipedia for information on the Avengers, the comic book ones, not the cinematic ones, I discovered that they didn't just use the Norse Gods in the series because Hercules also happens to be an avenger, and he's Greek (though I haven't seen any Hercules comics around the place, not that I actually go out of my way to look for them). However, the one thing that I can say about this series is that it doesn't seem to be connected with the films, and if it is it is set after the films. The reason I say this is because Thor, and his buddies, have moved to Midheim, otherwise known as Earth, and Asgardia (not to be confused with the realm of Asgard) happens to be floating over Kansas, the reason being is because Jane happens to live in Kansas, not that she is actually going out with Thor anymore, but they are still friends (not that her new boyfriend is particularly impressed with this). As for this story I actually quite enjoyed it. It is about how this evil and rather nasty Dark Elf sorcerer escapes from prison and then starts wrecking havoc around the nine realms, mostly destroying his own Dark Elf kin. Thor then teams up with representatives from each of the other realms to defeat him, though there is a rather interesting twist at the end. I actually quite liked Malekith (and those who has een The Dark World would probably be familiar with him), even if it was that he was some nasty Dark Elf sorcerer that is basically out to destroy everybody, even the dark elves. As for Thor, and the setting, it does have quite a fantasy element within it, though the first part really only has Thor running around meeting up with various humans and it isn't until part two that the Malekith plot really starts to fire up. Being the third in the series I did sort of feel that I jumped into the middle of the story, however I didn't feel that I had actually missed anything by not reading the previous two comics. Certainly having watched the movies did help, but once again it wasn't necessary. I did quite enjoy it, even though it was a comic (and I tend not to get into them too much), but there were aspects that probably suggest it is geared towards at least a more mature audience, though not necessarily one that is over the age of eighteen. Oh, and the artwork is pretty cool as well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Esad Ribic took a well deserved break after crafting the visuals for the first ten issues of the story that has become a high-water mark in Thor stories. This volume is instead a collection of guest artists who are more than capable of stepping into Ribic shoes and giving their own take on the newly redesigned Thor. This collection is book-ended by single issues by artists Nic Klein and Das Pastoras, each taking the helm of one chapter, while frequent Aaron collaborator Ron Garney took on the mu Esad Ribic took a well deserved break after crafting the visuals for the first ten issues of the story that has become a high-water mark in Thor stories. This volume is instead a collection of guest artists who are more than capable of stepping into Ribic shoes and giving their own take on the newly redesigned Thor. This collection is book-ended by single issues by artists Nic Klein and Das Pastoras, each taking the helm of one chapter, while frequent Aaron collaborator Ron Garney took on the multi-part story in between. #12 - After a long time away, he was busy fighting the God-Butcher with his past and future selves, Thor reconnects with Midgard and its people in ways only the Thunder God can. Along the way, seeds are planted for future stories and character development; this was where readers first met Roz Solomon, future SHIELD agent, and heard the news of how Jane Foster's cancer has taken a turn for the worse. #13 - Aaron crafts a heist story to bring back Malekith from the worse prison in all of the realms. From here on, Malekith would prove to be long-lasting thorn in the side of the Thors to come. He would be the main villain for many of the stories to come and it all started here. #14 - In a future issue, Roz Solomon called the League of Realms, the Tolkien Avengers. It's easy to see why, the roster looks like it was lifted directly from a Peter Jackson movie. #15 - After a rocky start, the team is starting to get together. Leave it to Thor to have a drinking contest with a giant in order to improve team chemistry. #16 - Politics colored this war with Malekith. It's the reason this war with soon engulf all the realms. That last page is straight out of nightmares, for sure. #17 - This story shows another side of Thor that few writers explore. His slyness is unexpected, but as he said: "You don't grow up the brother of Loki without learning a few of his tricks". #18 - Thor versus a dragon! At first though, it had the makings of buddy movie. But sadly, in this story, the age of dragons is over, this is a theme that would recur in another issue in the future. After the epicness of the God-Butcher arc, it's easy to be underwhelmed by this volume. In its way, the stories collected here has grown on me. A breather is always needed after an intense story, and sometime, a romp across the realms is one such adventure that could serve as palate cleanser. In my youth, I would have scored this 3 stars, but like fine wine, this has only gotten better with age. 4 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rituraj Kashyap

    After the awesomeness of the last two volumes, this one really disappointed me. Malekith the Accursed is released from his prison in Hel, and goes on a murder spree of the dark elves living in all the nine realms. It seems like he is the antagonist in this book because of the movie Thor: The Dark World. Anyway, a ragtag group of warriors, led by Thor, is formed to stop him, but it seems they have a traitor in their midst. The story did not have the magic of the last one. The Accursed arc runs fro After the awesomeness of the last two volumes, this one really disappointed me. Malekith the Accursed is released from his prison in Hel, and goes on a murder spree of the dark elves living in all the nine realms. It seems like he is the antagonist in this book because of the movie Thor: The Dark World. Anyway, a ragtag group of warriors, led by Thor, is formed to stop him, but it seems they have a traitor in their midst. The story did not have the magic of the last one. The Accursed arc runs from issues #13 to #17, while #12 and #18 are one-shots. In issue #12 Thor returns to Midgard after a long time and fulfills his duties as a hero of Earth. This issue touched me, with Thor meeting a death row inmate and granting him his last wish before execution. There were other moments too, like Thor bringing fruits from other planets for the children and cooking a dragon shark for them. We also get to meet Jane Foster, although in some rather unfortunate circumstances. I wish we could see more of such endeavors of Thor. Issue #18 deals with the drunken adventures of a young Thor in 894 AD. This one seemed too rushed, with a lot happening in a single issue and I could not get used to the art. I hope the next volume is good.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheese

    I thought from other reviewers that this would be poor, but I just found it to be very different. Malekeith is a different kind of enemy to Gorr. Where Gorr was misled by his own Trauma, Malekeith is like Thor's Lex Luthor. He's pure evil and very clever and conniving. A worthy opponent for Thor and a good read. I thought from other reviewers that this would be poor, but I just found it to be very different. Malekeith is a different kind of enemy to Gorr. Where Gorr was misled by his own Trauma, Malekeith is like Thor's Lex Luthor. He's pure evil and very clever and conniving. A worthy opponent for Thor and a good read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Just a Girl Fighting Censorship

    2 1/2 Stars I did not enjoy this as much as the first two volumes. I was somewhat confused by the timeline as the narrative is still skipping through time presenting Thor past, present, and future. The first issue in this volume seems somewhat out of place with Thor doing several charitable acts and then visiting with Jane Foster (view spoiler)[ She now has cancer and I didn't care. Also the blue side of the moon? Seriously? (hide spoiler)] Then we switch into the main narrative for this volume wh 2 1/2 Stars I did not enjoy this as much as the first two volumes. I was somewhat confused by the timeline as the narrative is still skipping through time presenting Thor past, present, and future. The first issue in this volume seems somewhat out of place with Thor doing several charitable acts and then visiting with Jane Foster (view spoiler)[ She now has cancer and I didn't care. Also the blue side of the moon? Seriously? (hide spoiler)] Then we switch into the main narrative for this volume which deals with getting to know the Dark Elves and the other inhabitants of the 9 realms. This starts out with a Norse creation story and leads to the Dark Elves breaking Malekith out of Hel. This is the point where I am uncertain as to when the story is taking place because when we see Thor again he seems very different from the Thor in the previous issue who was helping nuns and visiting monks. However, he has his hammer and so I assume he is the Thor of today. Next we are introduced to the League of Realms which is comprised of Lady Waziria (Dark Elf, Sir Ivory Honeyshot (Light Elf), Screwbeard (Dwarf), Oggy (Giant), and Ud (Troll) and they have been tasked with defeating Malekith in order to protect the 9 Realms. This team follows the annoying cliche of hating each other but somehow overcoming adversity to come together and make the team work. Meanwhile Malekith is running around killing all of this own people because somehow that makes sense. To my disappointment the one female on the team is reduced to a sex object. All team members have a bet going, who will 'bed' Lady Waziria first....guess who wins... [image error] Any who there is a bunch of fighting, violent deaths, and destruction. Then Thor pulls off some sort of Loki stunt that is completely uncharacteristic and unbelievable and everything is suddenly wrapped up. (view spoiler)[Malekith is rewarded for his senseless violence by being reinstated as the King of the Dark Elves and Lady Waziria volunteers to spend 1,000 in Hel so that Malekith ends up receiving absolutely no punishment... (hide spoiler)] Then the last issue is completely random, it starts off as a humorous story about Young Thor meeting up with a Dragon, killing trolls, and then getting totally wasted. Then it goes dark really really fast. It becomes violent and very sad. Is this some sort of PSA about the dangers of alcohol? I thought it was a terrible note to end the book on and really left a bad taste in my mouth... Overall I was entertained but ultimately disappointed. The writing felt very unoriginal and lazy. There were so many cliches I lost count and my eyes where sore from rolling. Still, the art is phenomenal and I enjoy the story being centered around Norse/Marvel mythology.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    A troll, a giant, a dark elf, a light elf, a dwarf and a thunder god walk into a bar… Holy Hobbit! This one has all the ingredients for a nerd’s delight; all it’s missing is a twenty sided dice. There you go. Shades of the second Thor movie, Malekith, the Accursed has escaped from Spider-Jail and he’s bent on upsetting the balance in the Nine Realms on his way to ruling the Dark Elves. A representative from each of the realms are tasked with hunting him down and of course none get along with one an A troll, a giant, a dark elf, a light elf, a dwarf and a thunder god walk into a bar… Holy Hobbit! This one has all the ingredients for a nerd’s delight; all it’s missing is a twenty sided dice. There you go. Shades of the second Thor movie, Malekith, the Accursed has escaped from Spider-Jail and he’s bent on upsetting the balance in the Nine Realms on his way to ruling the Dark Elves. A representative from each of the realms are tasked with hunting him down and of course none get along with one another. Friction = Fun! I would have thought that Jason Aaron only had one good Thor story in him, but I have been proven wrong. This one’s not as sharp as Thor: God of Thunder, Vol. 1: The God Butcher, but it’s an engaging tale. The Malekith story is bookended by single issue tales. The first takes a look at what Thor does in his spare time on Midgard… …including a visit to his former love, Jane Foster, who’s struggling with cancer. The second visits the young Thor of long ago, who spends his time alternately drunk, covered with vomit and making friends with a shark/dragon creature. Bottom line: Aaron’s run on Thor has been nothing short of terrific. This volume would be a nice jumping-on point for the uninitiated – fast and fun. Heh!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Ruining what was the most perfect Thor run since 80s Simonson, 'The Accursed' comes a little late on the heels of the not-so-blockbuster movie (which I personally loved). Handed down from the Marvel execs in order to synergize the film and book franchises, Aaron has to introduce to us the most boring and worthless villain in the cosmic arsenal to date- Malekith, the dark elf. Sigh. Just leave it be. Seriously. Let writers do what they want if the books are hot. Aaron's superb run feels like it c Ruining what was the most perfect Thor run since 80s Simonson, 'The Accursed' comes a little late on the heels of the not-so-blockbuster movie (which I personally loved). Handed down from the Marvel execs in order to synergize the film and book franchises, Aaron has to introduce to us the most boring and worthless villain in the cosmic arsenal to date- Malekith, the dark elf. Sigh. Just leave it be. Seriously. Let writers do what they want if the books are hot. Aaron's superb run feels like it comes to an abrupt halt (barring issue 12, which was gorgeous) and starts to limp a little bit as it builds a cheerleading pyramid atop the shoulders of Tolkein. How's that? Oh nothing much we just get a bunch of otherworldly souls together who hate each other to form an alliance, like, say, dwarves and elves and that and they go off to throw a ring into a volcano or something. Or to stop Malekith. It's really all the same. Instead of using the group in the same way Johns used the creation of the Outsiders in his recent Aquaman run, and making them all extremely interesting and likable, we get a few good one liners and 90% of the work done as a rush job. Go here, fight, go there, fight. Nothing interesting. Nothing new. Nothing to add. And I think I've said everything in aging to say about Kubert's computer art. It's terrible. Writing: C- Art: D

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy O'Toole

    "The Accursed" is the third volume in Thor: God of Thunder. Here we see Malekith the Accursed return to the Thor comics, conveniently around the same time he showed up in the Thor movies. I suspected in advance that after the epic two-parter that was The God Butcher and Godbomb, that the third volume was going to feel like a little of a let down, but I didn't expect the results to be so disappointingly bland. It's just a bunch of uninteresting heroes (with the exception of a tough dark elf sorce "The Accursed" is the third volume in Thor: God of Thunder. Here we see Malekith the Accursed return to the Thor comics, conveniently around the same time he showed up in the Thor movies. I suspected in advance that after the epic two-parter that was The God Butcher and Godbomb, that the third volume was going to feel like a little of a let down, but I didn't expect the results to be so disappointingly bland. It's just a bunch of uninteresting heroes (with the exception of a tough dark elf sorceress) banding together to chase down a pretty uninteresting villain. The art is also largely uneven. Usually, I fly through these graphic novels, but it was a bit of a chore to get through this. It's really a pity because the Malekith arc is bookended by two one shots that are more worth your time. The first is a very low key storyline that shows what Thor is up to when he's not on epic quests, and the results are quite charming. The second is a story of young Thor and a dragon. Although it isn't as strong as the first one shot, it possesses some really attention grabbing artwork. Volume Three of Thor: God of Thunder wasn't really worth reading in my opinion. I'm not sure I'll be continuing on with this series or not.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    This volume is a bit of a letdown after the first two, and it's a mixed bag. The first issue is actually a decent "breather" after the first two volumes and makes for a good epilogue. It reestablishes Thor's baseline in the world as well as plants the seeds for a couple other storylines, but then it immediately jumps into the main multi-part story involving Malekith. I was initially excited about this because I wanted to know more about him. Malekith wants to be king of his people and he goes abo This volume is a bit of a letdown after the first two, and it's a mixed bag. The first issue is actually a decent "breather" after the first two volumes and makes for a good epilogue. It reestablishes Thor's baseline in the world as well as plants the seeds for a couple other storylines, but then it immediately jumps into the main multi-part story involving Malekith. I was initially excited about this because I wanted to know more about him. Malekith wants to be king of his people and he goes about this by...killing them all. The logic of that escaped me and nagged at me the whole time. Most of the remaining plot is Thor and friends trying to stop him. It felt...cliche and the ending also seemed like everything else was forced in order to get to the end position. The last issue is just a one-shot adventure for Thor and while slightly funny and slightly grim you walk away feeling it was just filler. Garney's art on the Malekith story wasn't bad. I typically like him and this run still has a "fantasy" feel to it but slightly more cartoony than Ribic's run. Overall, this volume is average. I still plan to buy the first two volumes in an OHC. Right now, whether I get the second volume is on the table depending on how Vol 4 TPB reads.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    **second read** Just as fun the second time. I love how Jason Aaron writes this character. It’s immensely badass and satisfying. ****first read**** Not as good as The God Butcher or God Bomb, but still very enjoyable. I very much miss Esad Ribic’s work... but Klein, Garney and especially Pastoras are adequate. The story is pretty simple. Malekith the badguy goes around doing badguy stuff. Thor assembles a team of warriors from all the realms to stop him. It was fun! I didn’t get bored... it just didn’ **second read** Just as fun the second time. I love how Jason Aaron writes this character. It’s immensely badass and satisfying. ****first read**** Not as good as The God Butcher or God Bomb, but still very enjoyable. I very much miss Esad Ribic’s work... but Klein, Garney and especially Pastoras are adequate. The story is pretty simple. Malekith the badguy goes around doing badguy stuff. Thor assembles a team of warriors from all the realms to stop him. It was fun! I didn’t get bored... it just didn’t “wow” me the way God Butcher/Godbomb did. It’s ok! Not every comic has to be mindblowing. My favorite story was actually issue #18 (the last one in this volume.) It wasn’t related to the main story... it was more of a side quest... but it had a really neat story and had outstanding artwork from Pastoras. All in all, this is worth reading... but if you’ve read past Jason Aaron Thor, manage your expectations. It’s far from the best that this run has to offer.

  23. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Damn just nowhere near as good the first 2 volumes. The artist changes but so do the stakes with the story. Not very strong in plot or fun.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robjr73

    This book had its moments especially early on but then slowly started to lose my interest. Thor is one of those heroes I’ve always wanted to like since I was a kid. I just have had a hard time over the years finding most of his adventures to be anything more than moderately entertaining. This book falls into that category hence the 3 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    Issue 18 was fantastic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    Since the Gorr story-line has ended, it only makes sense to bring back one of Thor’s long running enemies, Malekith. Especially since this came out in time for the theater release of Dark World, though I definitely prefer the comic version of Malekith. So basically Malekith comes back after having been imprisoned for a while and goes on a rampage, forcing Asgard and the other realms to put together their own version of the Avengers to try and take him down. I liked the odd and slightly volitle gr Since the Gorr story-line has ended, it only makes sense to bring back one of Thor’s long running enemies, Malekith. Especially since this came out in time for the theater release of Dark World, though I definitely prefer the comic version of Malekith. So basically Malekith comes back after having been imprisoned for a while and goes on a rampage, forcing Asgard and the other realms to put together their own version of the Avengers to try and take him down. I liked the odd and slightly volitle group that Thor is forced to work with. The Light-Elf and the Dark-Elf are constantly trading barbs, the dwarf basically just wants to kill stuff, and the troll hates everyone. Needless to say their team dynamic is not that great and leads them into more trouble. I really like Malekith. He’s slightly crazy, but he knows who he is dealing with and how to handle them. I definitely enjoyed all of the fighting and seeing the different realms, the Light Elf realm was a bit ridiculous though. As a plus side we get to see Jane Foster and some of Thor’s downtime on Midgard. Their moments were cute, and I appreciated the fact that she had long since moved on and that they remained friends despite that. She manages to be a much stronger character in a few pages than the character ever did on screen. Overall I still think the storyline is pretty solid, though maybe not as gripping as the God Butcher story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Not quite as epic as the God Butcher/Godbomb arc, but Jason Aaron knows how to write a Thor book and write it well. Whilst the main story arc here seems a bit shoved in so that this title can benefit from movie-viewers thanks to the inclusion of Malekith, there are some plot points that I expect will be important further down the line too. Surrounding the main 'Accursed' storyline are two done-in-ones, the first visiting some of the things Thor does outside of Asgard which is very emotional, and Not quite as epic as the God Butcher/Godbomb arc, but Jason Aaron knows how to write a Thor book and write it well. Whilst the main story arc here seems a bit shoved in so that this title can benefit from movie-viewers thanks to the inclusion of Malekith, there are some plot points that I expect will be important further down the line too. Surrounding the main 'Accursed' storyline are two done-in-ones, the first visiting some of the things Thor does outside of Asgard which is very emotional, and a story involving a dragon which is kind of out of the blue for no real reason. The artwork throughout is strong, though it does amuse me that Emanuela Luppachino does some fill-in work during the Accursed arc and it looks stronger than all of Ron Garney's art put together. I'm also not sold completely on Pastoras' art in the dragon story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Little disappointing after the first two volumes (God Butcher and God Bomb . There's more world building here, as Aaron takes us into the Nine Realms and we meet the other beings that are well known in the Thor universe. Malekith (much like his part in the film Thor: The Dark World) doesn't stand out much as a villain. The highpoint of the volume is the final issue (#18) as we see Young Thor protecting a town from a Dragon. A Dragon who is fluent in speech, which immediately reminded me of Smaug Little disappointing after the first two volumes (God Butcher and God Bomb . There's more world building here, as Aaron takes us into the Nine Realms and we meet the other beings that are well known in the Thor universe. Malekith (much like his part in the film Thor: The Dark World) doesn't stand out much as a villain. The highpoint of the volume is the final issue (#18) as we see Young Thor protecting a town from a Dragon. A Dragon who is fluent in speech, which immediately reminded me of Smaug from the Hobbit in all the best possible ways.

  29. 5 out of 5

    'kris Pung

    Well the action slows down and we get some nice world building and a tour of the 9 realms and its inhabitants. There’s also a fun Lord of the Rings feel w/ reluctant emissaries from the different realms join forces to hunt down the treacherous Malekith. As good as the Malekith arc is the one shot w/ young Thor and the dragon steals the show. I’d say the ability to craft a good one shot in modern comics seems to be a lost art but Jason Aaron clearly shows his mastery here. Even if you didn’t like Well the action slows down and we get some nice world building and a tour of the 9 realms and its inhabitants. There’s also a fun Lord of the Rings feel w/ reluctant emissaries from the different realms join forces to hunt down the treacherous Malekith. As good as the Malekith arc is the one shot w/ young Thor and the dragon steals the show. I’d say the ability to craft a good one shot in modern comics seems to be a lost art but Jason Aaron clearly shows his mastery here. Even if you didn’t like the first God Butcher/Bomb arc give this one a try I think it’ll surprise you.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria Kramer

    What the heck happened between volume 2 and this? YIkes. After facing a god-destroying bomb, this is a bit anticlimactic. Also, whoever did character design for Malekith was clearly thinking of the Joker - I cannot take that face seriously. It's too over the top. The merry band of misfits who go to hunt him are supposed to be funny, but are just annoying. Skip it! What the heck happened between volume 2 and this? YIkes. After facing a god-destroying bomb, this is a bit anticlimactic. Also, whoever did character design for Malekith was clearly thinking of the Joker - I cannot take that face seriously. It's too over the top. The merry band of misfits who go to hunt him are supposed to be funny, but are just annoying. Skip it!

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