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Moonhead and the Music Machine

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Life's a peach when you've got a moon for a head and your head's in space. You can wander out of the Earth's atmosphere on intergalactic daydreams, drift blissfully across star-speckled skies and fly close to the Sun, like a fireproof Icarus. Snap! Back to reality—having a moon for a head at high school is much more tricky. You get picked on for your "crater-face" and the c Life's a peach when you've got a moon for a head and your head's in space. You can wander out of the Earth's atmosphere on intergalactic daydreams, drift blissfully across star-speckled skies and fly close to the Sun, like a fireproof Icarus. Snap! Back to reality—having a moon for a head at high school is much more tricky. You get picked on for your "crater-face" and the cool kids kick your head around like a soccer ball! But when the school talent contest is announced, Joey spots an opportunity to impress his classmates and so begins Joey Moonhead's stellar mission to create a music machine that is out of this world! An imaginative and visually poetic take on the stock American high school drama, Moonhead and the Music Machine is a subtle blend between Napoleon Dynamite and Ovid's Metamorphoses. Andrew Rae's graphic novel is life-affirming and powerfully illustrated. Andrew Rae is a London-based illustrator with a worldwide client base through his work in advertising, print, publishing, and animation.


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Life's a peach when you've got a moon for a head and your head's in space. You can wander out of the Earth's atmosphere on intergalactic daydreams, drift blissfully across star-speckled skies and fly close to the Sun, like a fireproof Icarus. Snap! Back to reality—having a moon for a head at high school is much more tricky. You get picked on for your "crater-face" and the c Life's a peach when you've got a moon for a head and your head's in space. You can wander out of the Earth's atmosphere on intergalactic daydreams, drift blissfully across star-speckled skies and fly close to the Sun, like a fireproof Icarus. Snap! Back to reality—having a moon for a head at high school is much more tricky. You get picked on for your "crater-face" and the cool kids kick your head around like a soccer ball! But when the school talent contest is announced, Joey spots an opportunity to impress his classmates and so begins Joey Moonhead's stellar mission to create a music machine that is out of this world! An imaginative and visually poetic take on the stock American high school drama, Moonhead and the Music Machine is a subtle blend between Napoleon Dynamite and Ovid's Metamorphoses. Andrew Rae's graphic novel is life-affirming and powerfully illustrated. Andrew Rae is a London-based illustrator with a worldwide client base through his work in advertising, print, publishing, and animation.

30 review for Moonhead and the Music Machine

  1. 5 out of 5

    [Shai] Bibliophage

    How odd?! That's my initial reaction after checking out this graphic novel by Andrew Rae. The illustrations are undeniably eye-catching, but I just don't get some parts which I found really strange. Also, the artwork has the psychedelic vibe because of how multicolored they are. Even though it didn't made to my criteria of notable reads, there are other people who can find this graphic novel still inspiring — notably those who are artists or musicians. How odd?! That's my initial reaction after checking out this graphic novel by Andrew Rae. The illustrations are undeniably eye-catching, but I just don't get some parts which I found really strange. Also, the artwork has the psychedelic vibe because of how multicolored they are. Even though it didn't made to my criteria of notable reads, there are other people who can find this graphic novel still inspiring — notably those who are artists or musicians.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    This is just silly, but it has a little edge of surrealism that I like. I thought it was hilarious, actually. But the story itself, on the bare surface, is typical YA alienation, though not dark and brutal, but light and sorta Beavis and Butthead. Sorta. Moonhead is an outsider. Hangs with a nerd girl. Bullied by popular kids. But the reason he is bullied is because he has a moon head… which his parents don't find strange because they do, too. The precise drawing of buildings makes me think he ha This is just silly, but it has a little edge of surrealism that I like. I thought it was hilarious, actually. But the story itself, on the bare surface, is typical YA alienation, though not dark and brutal, but light and sorta Beavis and Butthead. Sorta. Moonhead is an outsider. Hangs with a nerd girl. Bullied by popular kids. But the reason he is bullied is because he has a moon head… which his parents don't find strange because they do, too. The precise drawing of buildings makes me think he has been influenced by Chris Ware. Moonhead invents a kind of guitar and gets involved (or thinks he gets involved?) with a ghost friend who helps him break on through to the other side into popularity by performing at the high school talent show, dude! And there's some ghostbuster kinda slime that figures in. Maybe it's just juvenile silly, mainly, but it made me smile. The goofiness of the story and the increasing surrealistic aspects of it are attractively and well done. It's not Charles Burns, but it has a little Burns in it, maybe, as it turns stranger. I mean, Burns begins with normal high school students in Black Hole and then put them through a night mare of bizarreness. This story in Moonhead is not that original at all on the surface; it's in the weird silly details that it is crazy, possibly drug-induced. I think alt high school kids would dig it. Oh, and that moon head design reminds me of the moon face in Georges Méliès' trippy 1902 A Trip to the Moon (that is also featured in that Martin Scorsese film Hugo). That aspect of the drawing and conception (and the precisely designed architecture ala Ware) makes me think this is a cut above the usual Beavis stuff.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    An interesting take on young adult tropes, Moonhead and the Music Machine is one of the more bizarre and intriguing graphic novels I've read in recent memory. Joey Moonhead is aptly named -- he and his family have moons for heads. Trying to find his place in high school, Joey struggles between his parents' expectations and his desire to fit in. When the school talent show comes up, Joey invents his own instrument and shocks his peer by not only playing but being pretty good at it. Filled with th An interesting take on young adult tropes, Moonhead and the Music Machine is one of the more bizarre and intriguing graphic novels I've read in recent memory. Joey Moonhead is aptly named -- he and his family have moons for heads. Trying to find his place in high school, Joey struggles between his parents' expectations and his desire to fit in. When the school talent show comes up, Joey invents his own instrument and shocks his peer by not only playing but being pretty good at it. Filled with things only a graphic novel can do, Moonhead and the Music Machine is an immersive, entertaining experience. On one level, it would be easy to zip through the story but doing that doesn't allow for really taking in the various panels and visuals created by Andrew Rae. And while the story itself isn't exactly a new one, Rae's take on the coming of age young adult story is intriguing enough to make spending time with Joey Moonhead worth it. In the interest of full disclosure, I received an ARC of this book from the Amazon Vine program.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    I'm not sure what to say or where to start with this review. I really liked this book, both the story and the art; however, I will admit I don't *get* it and am perplexed by its meaning. I don't really believe in over analyzing books; if you are not hit with deep profound meaning, philosophy, theology, etc. then don't look for it and just enjoy the entertainment. And that is what "Moonhead" was to me. Pure enjoyment. Joey Moonhead has an actual moon for a head, so does his mum and dad. Everyone I'm not sure what to say or where to start with this review. I really liked this book, both the story and the art; however, I will admit I don't *get* it and am perplexed by its meaning. I don't really believe in over analyzing books; if you are not hit with deep profound meaning, philosophy, theology, etc. then don't look for it and just enjoy the entertainment. And that is what "Moonhead" was to me. Pure enjoyment. Joey Moonhead has an actual moon for a head, so does his mum and dad. Everyone else are normal human beings. Nobody makes an issue of this except that bullies tease him and grab his head to throw around and stuff. Joey gains some fame after competing in the school talent contest, gains self-confidence but also learns lessons about what happens when one forgets old friends on the way up, and the price paid to enter the "in crowd". I really felt for Joey and his female friend Sprocket. Even though I was completely baffled, the psychedelic transformations and accompanying artwork, when he played his music machine had me gleeful. I found the art totally impressive. Very sixties, Beatles, hallucinogenic. It's a difficult call on recommended age group but the story is about highschool and contains adult language, so certainly not for children even though the art does look cute. Very unique and whimsical.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Naty

    I wanted to like this story because it was recommended to me by a friend whose opinions I trust. But the story overall is just...meh. I don't have any strong feelings about it one way or another. The whole thing felt lacking to me in a way I can't pinpoint. Some of the beginning scenes where his head travels to all these places leaving his body behind were more engaging for me than the later plot line about the music machine. Maybe that's because I wanted the story to be more about him having a I wanted to like this story because it was recommended to me by a friend whose opinions I trust. But the story overall is just...meh. I don't have any strong feelings about it one way or another. The whole thing felt lacking to me in a way I can't pinpoint. Some of the beginning scenes where his head travels to all these places leaving his body behind were more engaging for me than the later plot line about the music machine. Maybe that's because I wanted the story to be more about him having a moon for a head and less about him just being an odd kid that happened to have a moon for a head.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    The story itself is an old, familiar one: oddball kid, picked on by the popular kids, discovers hidden talent, impresses everyone, discovers that true friends are what really matter. What elevates this is Andrew Rae's artwork. It's decidedly on the surreal side, with metaphors becoming concrete. Moonhead literally has a floating moon for a head, and when his mind wanders, it really wanders, as his head goes floating off on flights of fancy. It's really quite fun. Rae's art springs from a nice cl The story itself is an old, familiar one: oddball kid, picked on by the popular kids, discovers hidden talent, impresses everyone, discovers that true friends are what really matter. What elevates this is Andrew Rae's artwork. It's decidedly on the surreal side, with metaphors becoming concrete. Moonhead literally has a floating moon for a head, and when his mind wanders, it really wanders, as his head goes floating off on flights of fancy. It's really quite fun. Rae's art springs from a nice clean line, and kind of reminds me of Chester Brown, skinny figures with slightly elongated heads, subtle facial expressions, etc. I especially enjoyed the sequence toward the middle of the book where Moonhead is listening to records. Rae devotes a number of half page panels to showing the records, and at least some of them are based on classic albums. Possibly all of them are and I'm just not familiar with the originals. But The Ministry of Beat is pretty clearly based on The Beatles' Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, and Space Surfing by The Asteroids is a riff on Cream's Strange Brew. The story may be something of a cliche, but the execution is enjoyable enough to more than make up for that. Recommended!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    A nice story, especially one that would appeal to a younger audience. But was this one written with that certain readership in mind? And am I not giving the book it's due by framing it as a book primarily for younger readers? Another book for our upcoming Publisher Spotlight on Nobrow. A nice story, especially one that would appeal to a younger audience. But was this one written with that certain readership in mind? And am I not giving the book it's due by framing it as a book primarily for younger readers? Another book for our upcoming Publisher Spotlight on Nobrow.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    Joey is a normal kid in every way expect for one: he has a moon for a head. Weird and funny.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Watts

    Trying to discover a few more books these days, and not just go off recommendations. Found this one in daves comics in brighton, seemed like the kind of off the wall story that would appeal to me (a kid has a giant moon for a head). Artwork reminded me off old school mtv cartoons like beavis and butthead. It’s not Shakespeare, just some dumb fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    A musical, magical coming of age story! Very enjoyable, would re-read. My favorite part is all the made-up album covers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    This book made me feel as if I were on acid or something. It's a wee bit trippy, but not necessarily bad. This beautifully illustrated graphic novel follows Joet Moonhead as he attempts to rise above his not so awesome life. As can be imagined, the kids at school pick on him because HE HAS A MOON FOR A HEAD! He lusts after one of the popular girls, Melissa, but the only person who treats him normal is his friend Sockets. Joey decides that in order to be noticed (in a good way) by the people who This book made me feel as if I were on acid or something. It's a wee bit trippy, but not necessarily bad. This beautifully illustrated graphic novel follows Joet Moonhead as he attempts to rise above his not so awesome life. As can be imagined, the kids at school pick on him because HE HAS A MOON FOR A HEAD! He lusts after one of the popular girls, Melissa, but the only person who treats him normal is his friend Sockets. Joey decides that in order to be noticed (in a good way) by the people who matter he must form a band and play in the talent show. Joey can't just play any old music instrument, he has to make something really cool. With the help of his friend Ghostboy they make this crazy instrument and blow the socks off the whole school. Suddenly Joey Moonhead is too cool for Sockets. Is he letting popularity get to his already too large head? This book is utterly ridiculous. Thank goodness for the awesome illustrations. That's really what kept me going. The bright psychedelic colors are amazeballs. The storyline is your not so typical coming of age story. Due to the illustrations of some of Joey's lustier thoughts I wouldn't recommend this to young teens. That is unless you want to listen to parents chew you out about why there are colorful animals humping like crazy and phallic symbols (among others) galore. Interesting read....

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    What an odd book! Joey Moonhead does indeed have a moon for a head. And when he gets bored, his head takes off on flights of fancy. Joey is a bit if a dreamer and a weirdo, but this is recognized because of his moon head, and bullies at school torment him for it. Andrew Rae's story shows a passion for music as Joey discovers a box of records and is transported by listening to them. He builds his music machine (because why just learn an instrument when you can build one that sort of magically pla What an odd book! Joey Moonhead does indeed have a moon for a head. And when he gets bored, his head takes off on flights of fancy. Joey is a bit if a dreamer and a weirdo, but this is recognized because of his moon head, and bullies at school torment him for it. Andrew Rae's story shows a passion for music as Joey discovers a box of records and is transported by listening to them. He builds his music machine (because why just learn an instrument when you can build one that sort of magically plays for you?) and, after overcoming some issues with the prototype, he and his friend, Ghostboy, have a working magic music machine. I liked the artwork, particularly the homages to famous albums/ musicians. The change in layout when Joey plays at the talent show was gorgeous. I felt kind of meh about the storyline because it seemed like it was trying to work on too many levels. I was sure I was missing something. The occasional moments of humor - joey's shop teacher giving him run of the shop - we're welcome and I would've liked to have seen more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    For reasons that are never explained, Joey Moonhead has a moon for a head. He's pretty much like most other teens in every other respect. He wants to attract the attention of Melissa, the hot girl at school; ignores his real friend, Sockets; contends with bullies who belittle him and tease him about his imperfections; and dreams of somehow becoming a rock star. When Ghostboy decides to help him build an amazing musical instrument and perform in the school talent show, Moonhead is thrilled. Sudde For reasons that are never explained, Joey Moonhead has a moon for a head. He's pretty much like most other teens in every other respect. He wants to attract the attention of Melissa, the hot girl at school; ignores his real friend, Sockets; contends with bullies who belittle him and tease him about his imperfections; and dreams of somehow becoming a rock star. When Ghostboy decides to help him build an amazing musical instrument and perform in the school talent show, Moonhead is thrilled. Suddenly, everyone notices him--in a good way--and the music has an unusual effect on some classmates. At its heart, of course, this graphic novel about bullying and having faith in oneself tackles some familiar themes, but it does so in a unique way. I liked this one for a lot of reasons, one of which was because of what happens to the main bully and his partner. (Shhh! I'm not telling. You'll have to read it to find out.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    I've recently had the good fortune to discover comics and graphic novels published by Nobrow Press, and if you've never heard of Nobrow before, Moonhead and the Music Machine by Andrew Rae is an excellent place to start. It is a stunning graphic novel that is representative of Nobrow's highly selective catalog. Nobrow puts out high quality art books, so if you are a fan of sequential art, you'll want to get your hands on their new releases. In addition to high quality content, each book has uniq I've recently had the good fortune to discover comics and graphic novels published by Nobrow Press, and if you've never heard of Nobrow before, Moonhead and the Music Machine by Andrew Rae is an excellent place to start. It is a stunning graphic novel that is representative of Nobrow's highly selective catalog. Nobrow puts out high quality art books, so if you are a fan of sequential art, you'll want to get your hands on their new releases. In addition to high quality content, each book has unique dimensions that are well-suited to the nature of each individual project. As a result, the books don't look like all the ... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steph Myers

    I'd give this higher marks for the artwork, which reminded me of Daniel Clowes combined with a hint of Crumb. The characters were fine and the plot was fine, but psychedelia just didn't work for me. However, if you look past that, it's kind of the classic high school story. Geek gets pushed around then does something cool, then might be accepted by cool kids, but it's not to be . . . Yada yada yada. I'd give this higher marks for the artwork, which reminded me of Daniel Clowes combined with a hint of Crumb. The characters were fine and the plot was fine, but psychedelia just didn't work for me. However, if you look past that, it's kind of the classic high school story. Geek gets pushed around then does something cool, then might be accepted by cool kids, but it's not to be . . . Yada yada yada.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid

    Adolescence is hard enough without having a moon for a head! Sheesh! Great color palette and art, a premise that is almost too deliberately weird, and an after-school-specialy moral more appropriate for teens than adults ("You can do it yourself!"), I rate this one a so-so-and-a-half. Adolescence is hard enough without having a moon for a head! Sheesh! Great color palette and art, a premise that is almost too deliberately weird, and an after-school-specialy moral more appropriate for teens than adults ("You can do it yourself!"), I rate this one a so-so-and-a-half.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved this sweet, kind of trippy graphic novel about a misfit, his desire to play music, and his journey of discovering who his true friends are. Rae's art style is clean with lots of beautiful color. I loved this sweet, kind of trippy graphic novel about a misfit, his desire to play music, and his journey of discovering who his true friends are. Rae's art style is clean with lots of beautiful color.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    I got a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program to review. I am honestly at a bit of a loss here as to what I thought about this book. It was somewhat entertaining and the illustration is beautifully done. However, I felt like I was missing something. This is the story of a boy who has a moon for a head. His parents also have moons for heads. This is never explained just accepted. Generally Moonhead is a normal highschool boy, the main difference being he can allow his head to float off I got a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program to review. I am honestly at a bit of a loss here as to what I thought about this book. It was somewhat entertaining and the illustration is beautifully done. However, I felt like I was missing something. This is the story of a boy who has a moon for a head. His parents also have moons for heads. This is never explained just accepted. Generally Moonhead is a normal highschool boy, the main difference being he can allow his head to float off and explore distant places. I think this might be a some sort of metaphor for someone who is a dreamer and struggling to fit in...however I am not quite sure. Moonhead has a lot of issues that high school students have. He is after the hottest girl in the school but doesn’t recognize the good friend his has in his current close friend, he’s made fun of for his head and doesn’t quite fit in, and he finds most school work boring and hard to pay attention to. He breaks from his norm when he decides to enter a talent competition and make a music machine. From this point the story goes into a whole “remember who your real friends are” kind of theme and a weird side theme where people at school are showing up as weird monsters (again maybe this is supposed to symbolize them showing up to Moonhead how they really are now??...not sure). The illustration is full color, well done, and easy to follow. There are some interesting additions to backgrounds that you have to look closely to see. For example, in his fantasies about the hot popular girl, the background flowers and vegetation have very suggestive shapes. I enjoyed the scenes where Moonhead’s head floats off and has adventures the most. The rest is pretty typical coming-of-age fare. In the end I was left a bit confused about what I had read and felt like maybe I missed something. However, I didn’t enjoy the story enough to go back and re-read it and try to figure it out. Overall this is a creative, fun, and slightly confusing story about a boy with a moon for a head who struggles to fit in at school. It’s kind of interesting and decently done. But I am honestly not sure what/who to recommend this too. If you are looking for a very different coming-of-age story maybe check this out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrycja

    This graphic novel is quite different and unique. Maybe some- what confusing. I am not exactly sure what message author tried to communicate. There is definitely message against bulling and that we should take care of our real friends and be proud of who we are. Because we are all unique in one way or another. And besides our differences, there will be still people who love us. Even if you have a Moon instead of a head. I understand that there are metaphors in the writing and I shouldn't take eve This graphic novel is quite different and unique. Maybe some- what confusing. I am not exactly sure what message author tried to communicate. There is definitely message against bulling and that we should take care of our real friends and be proud of who we are. Because we are all unique in one way or another. And besides our differences, there will be still people who love us. Even if you have a Moon instead of a head. I understand that there are metaphors in the writing and I shouldn't take everything literally, but sometimes I am just not sure, why author went in one direction, leaving me confused. I would recommend this graphic novel for teenagers. There is high school drama in the story, like a regular boy loving popular girl. And maybe best nerd friend loving not popular boy. There are many story lines, more stories inside the main story. There are some psychedelic like drawings and out of this word situations. But under all of this weirdness, there is just regular high school life and story to tell. If you like original illustrations, and maybe not so straight story line, this is a great graphic novel for you. ( I received this graphic novel in exchange for honest review).

  20. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    The story is entirely high school nerd-ville but he "said" some good stuff within. If this wasn't U.K. material I would've avoided it. I didn't regret reading it because this dork (he must be- they're the ones who are so hung up on that stuff) is a tremendously technically-sound draftsman- anything that's rendered with the lines of architecture is spectacular! I'm always thankful to artists who take the time to properly delineate automobiles at factory specifications. I've noticed that most artist The story is entirely high school nerd-ville but he "said" some good stuff within. If this wasn't U.K. material I would've avoided it. I didn't regret reading it because this dork (he must be- they're the ones who are so hung up on that stuff) is a tremendously technically-sound draftsman- anything that's rendered with the lines of architecture is spectacular! I'm always thankful to artists who take the time to properly delineate automobiles at factory specifications. I've noticed that most artists seem to either rush or avoid drawing automobiles- if they're any good at drawing them. 8===D His phallovulvic oeuvre is interesting [{'}] In dreamscapes you get all the flora shaped as such yet the sexy girl remains dubiously covered with foliage- probably because the author speaks English. For those Puritans who follow such "art-laws" I'll have you know she's a senior.

  21. 4 out of 5

    christinemm

    The underdog creative daydreamer ADHD kid is bullied by the rich popular kids at school for looking different and when he steps outside his comfort zone he wins new respect. Good story with an outcome we applaud. I loved that weird and unique was portrayed as positive. Loved the “head in the clouds” kid portrayed as a literal moonhead boy and that his daydreaming was shown as actual astral travel (out of body travel). Colorful illustrations and excellent use of the panels to show action in the s The underdog creative daydreamer ADHD kid is bullied by the rich popular kids at school for looking different and when he steps outside his comfort zone he wins new respect. Good story with an outcome we applaud. I loved that weird and unique was portrayed as positive. Loved the “head in the clouds” kid portrayed as a literal moonhead boy and that his daydreaming was shown as actual astral travel (out of body travel). Colorful illustrations and excellent use of the panels to show action in the story. Just right amount of text and illustration to be effective, Rae has talent and skill. Rating 5 stars = Love It. Appeal to teens or adults who enjoy graphic novels.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Moonhead is an odd kid in his private religious school. He is made fun of and rejected by the popular kids and he in turn rejects the girl who likes him, Sockets. For a talent show, he puts together an invention which combines an electric guitar and a keyboard. Ghostboy, a new friend helps him and he is a hit. I loved this book and the graphics are wonderful. There was a great nostalgia for record albums, rock bands, electric guitars and playing in the garage. A shout out to non-conformity, this Moonhead is an odd kid in his private religious school. He is made fun of and rejected by the popular kids and he in turn rejects the girl who likes him, Sockets. For a talent show, he puts together an invention which combines an electric guitar and a keyboard. Ghostboy, a new friend helps him and he is a hit. I loved this book and the graphics are wonderful. There was a great nostalgia for record albums, rock bands, electric guitars and playing in the garage. A shout out to non-conformity, this is a moving book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    My heart says I should rate this higher because the artwork is so so good, but my brain is like, no the art and the words must work together. The point of comics is what can happen when the two mediums meld, having one of the two cannot save the other. I liked the stuff about the kids turning into monsters after a musical awakening, but that was pretty much all I liked. I felt no connection to any of these characters and I didn't get the point of the Ghostboy character. My heart says I should rate this higher because the artwork is so so good, but my brain is like, no the art and the words must work together. The point of comics is what can happen when the two mediums meld, having one of the two cannot save the other. I liked the stuff about the kids turning into monsters after a musical awakening, but that was pretty much all I liked. I felt no connection to any of these characters and I didn't get the point of the Ghostboy character.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bekka

    Thanks to Nobrow Press and Edelweiss for access to this title. I quite enjoyed this story of high school life, told in such an imaginative and effective way! This is a great story about finding what you love, friendship and staying true to yourself. The illustrations are very enjoyable, the characters are fun, and its a sweet story. Great read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    It’s not the subtlest of metaphors but it’s so beautifully and joyfully done you really don’t care. Nobrow can be insufferably hipsterish at times but this is genuinely lovely and universal in its themes. I will definitely get a copy for my college’s library - plus pages of ridiculously daft fake album covers makes me deeply happy as that’s my current project in so many ways. A joy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jon Shanks

    A very quick read and quite a simple story, but beautifully rendered and a lot of fun. Just your baisc boy with a moon for a head inventing a weird musical instrument that infects its listeners with its weirdness, but in a good way!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben Miller

    A good reminder to let your freak flag fly. Especially if you're different. A good reminder to let your freak flag fly. Especially if you're different.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Sebesta

    Entirely inessential. Possibly sufficient to distract young children. Probably not, though.

  29. 4 out of 5

    brightredglow

    I'm kind of surprised that I liked this but then I expected it to be more weird. It is weird but it also has an earnest heart which was refreshing and enjoyable. I'm kind of surprised that I liked this but then I expected it to be more weird. It is weird but it also has an earnest heart which was refreshing and enjoyable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    Fantastic art and a story that would be easy for teens to relate to. A little heavier on the weird than the plot which is fine with me.

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