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Ghost Towns and Mining Camps of New Mexico

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In places like the valley town of Alma, once known to Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch, and through the dusty streets of San Antonio, where Conrad Hilton began his fabulous career by carrying luggage from the train station to his father’s hotel, the Shermans have explored the past and present of New Mexico’s famous and infamous ghost towns and mining camps. They have arrang In places like the valley town of Alma, once known to Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch, and through the dusty streets of San Antonio, where Conrad Hilton began his fabulous career by carrying luggage from the train station to his father’s hotel, the Shermans have explored the past and present of New Mexico’s famous and infamous ghost towns and mining camps. They have arranged for the reader a historical and pictorial journey through more than 130 of the state’s old and defunct mining, farming, railroad, and lumbering communities. A cross section of New Mexico’s legacy from the frontier past unfolds in an array of nostalgic photographs and highlights of the history and adventures of the people who lived there. Town entries are arranged alphabetically for ease of selection. More than 450 photographs illustrate the past and the contemporary condition of these communities. Ten excellent maps and accurate township, range, and section coordinates locate each settlement. Vacationers, ghost-town buffs, and armchair adventurers as well as serious historians can take a real or imagined trip to New Mexico’s past with this book in hand.


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In places like the valley town of Alma, once known to Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch, and through the dusty streets of San Antonio, where Conrad Hilton began his fabulous career by carrying luggage from the train station to his father’s hotel, the Shermans have explored the past and present of New Mexico’s famous and infamous ghost towns and mining camps. They have arrang In places like the valley town of Alma, once known to Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch, and through the dusty streets of San Antonio, where Conrad Hilton began his fabulous career by carrying luggage from the train station to his father’s hotel, the Shermans have explored the past and present of New Mexico’s famous and infamous ghost towns and mining camps. They have arranged for the reader a historical and pictorial journey through more than 130 of the state’s old and defunct mining, farming, railroad, and lumbering communities. A cross section of New Mexico’s legacy from the frontier past unfolds in an array of nostalgic photographs and highlights of the history and adventures of the people who lived there. Town entries are arranged alphabetically for ease of selection. More than 450 photographs illustrate the past and the contemporary condition of these communities. Ten excellent maps and accurate township, range, and section coordinates locate each settlement. Vacationers, ghost-town buffs, and armchair adventurers as well as serious historians can take a real or imagined trip to New Mexico’s past with this book in hand.

23 review for Ghost Towns and Mining Camps of New Mexico

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Gibson

    The picture on the cover? One of my favorite ghost towns. Because, you see, it really is a ghost. There is one building left, and you are looking at it. Standing alone on the side of a hill, high in the mountains often shrouded in fog. The town it was once a part of was one of the wildest damn places in the West, boasting at least one murder a day. The thing I like about this guide book is it makes the connections to nearby towns and doesn’t consider its subject as an isolated objective. The book The picture on the cover? One of my favorite ghost towns. Because, you see, it really is a ghost. There is one building left, and you are looking at it. Standing alone on the side of a hill, high in the mountains often shrouded in fog. The town it was once a part of was one of the wildest damn places in the West, boasting at least one murder a day. The thing I like about this guide book is it makes the connections to nearby towns and doesn’t consider its subject as an isolated objective. The book is well illustrated and informative. Directions are plain and simple—and correct for the most part. This is a pretty good companion if you are backroading and looking for old mining towns. There are a few in here not included in other books on the subject.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Learned about some of the areas around Gallup.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Glen Isham

  4. 4 out of 5

    tracy zanitsch

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Taylor

  6. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jody Visconti

  9. 4 out of 5

    AJ Brammer

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

  12. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Cielensky

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  14. 4 out of 5

    Perry Walker

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dmharv

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Addison

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rick

  22. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alma Rodriguez

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