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The Consolations of Economics: How We Will All Benefit from the New World Order

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In the next twenty years the world economy will enjoy one of its strongest periods of growth. Greater innovation and technical change will increase opportunities. Life expectancy, income and educational standards will rise. The West's share in the global economic cake may get smaller, but there will be more cake than ever before. These are the predictions of Gerard Lyons, a In the next twenty years the world economy will enjoy one of its strongest periods of growth. Greater innovation and technical change will increase opportunities. Life expectancy, income and educational standards will rise. The West's share in the global economic cake may get smaller, but there will be more cake than ever before. These are the predictions of Gerard Lyons, a leading international economist who spent nearly thirty years working in the City. He is now the chief economic adviser to the Mayor of London. Over the last quarter-century he has been ahead of the game in predicting the major economic trends that we now take as a given. The Consolations of Economics is a lucid and accessible expert's attempt to look objectively at the changing global economy - what is happening and what it means. He shows how we can embrace change, rather than hide from it. The results are fascinating, refreshing - and unusually cheering.


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In the next twenty years the world economy will enjoy one of its strongest periods of growth. Greater innovation and technical change will increase opportunities. Life expectancy, income and educational standards will rise. The West's share in the global economic cake may get smaller, but there will be more cake than ever before. These are the predictions of Gerard Lyons, a In the next twenty years the world economy will enjoy one of its strongest periods of growth. Greater innovation and technical change will increase opportunities. Life expectancy, income and educational standards will rise. The West's share in the global economic cake may get smaller, but there will be more cake than ever before. These are the predictions of Gerard Lyons, a leading international economist who spent nearly thirty years working in the City. He is now the chief economic adviser to the Mayor of London. Over the last quarter-century he has been ahead of the game in predicting the major economic trends that we now take as a given. The Consolations of Economics is a lucid and accessible expert's attempt to look objectively at the changing global economy - what is happening and what it means. He shows how we can embrace change, rather than hide from it. The results are fascinating, refreshing - and unusually cheering.

44 review for The Consolations of Economics: How We Will All Benefit from the New World Order

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    Randomly picked this book up at the National Library because *ECONOMICS*. I really wonder what people think of my borrowing history, it's like 9 comics (me and my bro), then one "Consolation of Economics". Anyway, this book is supposed to be a "lucid and accessible expert's attempt to look objectively at the changing global economy." So my review will focus on how "accessible" and "lucid" it is, not on how sound the economics is (I shall leave that to the experts, because I can't find any obvious Randomly picked this book up at the National Library because *ECONOMICS*. I really wonder what people think of my borrowing history, it's like 9 comics (me and my bro), then one "Consolation of Economics". Anyway, this book is supposed to be a "lucid and accessible expert's attempt to look objectively at the changing global economy." So my review will focus on how "accessible" and "lucid" it is, not on how sound the economics is (I shall leave that to the experts, because I can't find any obvious problems here). I must say, the book is surprisingly readable. I would think that as long as you've taken an introductory economics course, you will be able to understand what the author is talking about. Terms like "nominal" and "inflation" do appear, hence the "introductory knowledge needed" thing I just said. The author does a good job of explaining new terms too, like when he talks about soft power (he uses a slightly different definition than the norm). As for how international the book is - well, it's complicated. The book clearly looks at the global economy - China and India (particularly China) are discussed in depth, and Japan is talked about many times as well. Even Singapore made its fair share of appearances (way more than I was expecting). But, since this book is orientated towards readers in the Western economies (it is about how the shift of power to the East isn't necessarily detrimental to the West after all), there is slightly more focus on the UK, EU and the US. The book itself is divided into 9 parts, and includes: a brief history of economics, China's economy, the 2008 Financial crisis, the Ukraine crisis, the G7 and the G20, and lots more. You'd notice that the book is very very current, since it was published this year. I dare say that in a year or two, when some of the current crisis have played out, the book might not be as relevant, but for now, this is one of the most accessible books on modern economics that I've read. My favourite part of the book was, surprisingly, the last chapter, which looks at the future of economics. It references something that I learnt last semester, that younger economics prefer Game Theory, but older economists look at things like unemployment, fiscal policy, etc. So to read about Mr. Lyons' opinion was really interesting to me. All in all, this is an excellent and accessible book. Read it now (in 2014), because it contains information about current events. A year or two down the line, and a new edition might be in order, so get your hands on it quick. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ryan (Glay)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elfy Lyons

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

  6. 5 out of 5

    Henry Stokes

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Keaveney

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dorottya Tornai

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rimy Oberoi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vineet Pandey

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mikko Arevuo

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  14. 5 out of 5

    Igor

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rui

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauri Erik

  17. 4 out of 5

    J M

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Kirby

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  20. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Wonacott

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shreyansh Durgesh

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andy Rossiter

  23. 4 out of 5

    Narumon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Philip Cope

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mahyar

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris Dymond

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nico Macdonald

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bruna Aguiar

  31. 5 out of 5

    Warren

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Lum

  33. 4 out of 5

    ΉΣβΛ∞

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Chau

  35. 5 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jeria

  37. 5 out of 5

    Diana Burlan

  38. 4 out of 5

    Elena

  39. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  40. 5 out of 5

    Z

  41. 4 out of 5

    Junaid Taj

  42. 5 out of 5

    Venkatasubramanian

  43. 5 out of 5

    Sérgio Rocheteau

  44. 5 out of 5

    Mbemba Ousmane Kamara

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