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Douglas

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A river does not run through Douglas. There are no major airports nearby. The closest interstate is over an hour away in any direction. In every practical sense, it is in the middle of nowhere; nonetheless, people have been traveling to Douglas to make a living since its founding. The town is the product of rural industrialization. Businessmen from the Carolinas saw opport A river does not run through Douglas. There are no major airports nearby. The closest interstate is over an hour away in any direction. In every practical sense, it is in the middle of nowhere; nonetheless, people have been traveling to Douglas to make a living since its founding. The town is the product of rural industrialization. Businessmen from the Carolinas saw opportunity in the piney woods of Douglas, and they brought art, architecture, and business with them. In the historic district, there are the architectural wonders of William J.J. Chase, Abreu and Robeson, and Haralson Bleckley on Gaskin Avenue. The Ashley-Slater House is farther up the road and is said to be haunted and its story full of romance and scandal. While small in size and remote in location, Douglas strives to grow along with the rest of the country. Almost as early as the town was founded, South Georgia State College, one of the original members of the University System of Georgia, brought education and innovation to the community. That tradition continues with a 2011 mission change to allow SGSC to grant limited four-year degrees.


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A river does not run through Douglas. There are no major airports nearby. The closest interstate is over an hour away in any direction. In every practical sense, it is in the middle of nowhere; nonetheless, people have been traveling to Douglas to make a living since its founding. The town is the product of rural industrialization. Businessmen from the Carolinas saw opport A river does not run through Douglas. There are no major airports nearby. The closest interstate is over an hour away in any direction. In every practical sense, it is in the middle of nowhere; nonetheless, people have been traveling to Douglas to make a living since its founding. The town is the product of rural industrialization. Businessmen from the Carolinas saw opportunity in the piney woods of Douglas, and they brought art, architecture, and business with them. In the historic district, there are the architectural wonders of William J.J. Chase, Abreu and Robeson, and Haralson Bleckley on Gaskin Avenue. The Ashley-Slater House is farther up the road and is said to be haunted and its story full of romance and scandal. While small in size and remote in location, Douglas strives to grow along with the rest of the country. Almost as early as the town was founded, South Georgia State College, one of the original members of the University System of Georgia, brought education and innovation to the community. That tradition continues with a 2011 mission change to allow SGSC to grant limited four-year degrees.

36 review for Douglas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Martin

    A good read to learn of the history of Douglas from a fact based and pictorial representation. It is nice to learn the history of a town and citizenship, especially when it is not taught and passed down anymore.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charla

    This made for a fascinating review of Douglas history. Some buildings are still standing, and I like seeing how those buildings look now vs. the photos in the book. I mourn some of those that were torn down. Hopefully Douglas will experience a revival in the coming years.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judah

    An interesting, if not somewhat short, pictorial history of Douglas, GA. As is common in the Images of America series, pictures are separated by time period or by subject (WWII Flying School, or Reconstruction era for example). While I've never been to Douglas in person, I might want to visit it next time I drive off to Atlanta. Disclaimer: I received this book free, in exchange for my honest opinion via the goodreads giveaway program. An interesting, if not somewhat short, pictorial history of Douglas, GA. As is common in the Images of America series, pictures are separated by time period or by subject (WWII Flying School, or Reconstruction era for example). While I've never been to Douglas in person, I might want to visit it next time I drive off to Atlanta. Disclaimer: I received this book free, in exchange for my honest opinion via the goodreads giveaway program.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Courson

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Griffiths

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Anastasia Mccaskill

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vykki

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette Ralph

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shana M. Essig

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Huether

  14. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Stickann

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jo-Ann Murphy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angie Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Ranf

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julie McWhirter

  24. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kim Hathorn

  27. 5 out of 5

    SARIT

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Adams

  31. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie Gass

  32. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Hodges

  33. 5 out of 5

    LLL Reads

  34. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  36. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Zitsch

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