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Inventor. Visionary. Genius. Dropout. Adopted. Steve Jobs was the founder of Apple and he was all of these things. Steve Jobs has been described as a showman, artist, tyrant, genius, jerk. Through his life he was loved, hated, admired and dismissed, yet he was a living legend; the genius who founded Apple in his parent's garage when he was just 21 years-old, revolutionisin Inventor. Visionary. Genius. Dropout. Adopted. Steve Jobs was the founder of Apple and he was all of these things. Steve Jobs has been described as a showman, artist, tyrant, genius, jerk. Through his life he was loved, hated, admired and dismissed, yet he was a living legend; the genius who founded Apple in his parent's garage when he was just 21 years-old, revolutionising the music world. He single-handedly introduced the first computer that could sit on your desk and founded and nurtured a company called Pixar bringing to life Oscar wining animations Toy Story and Finding Nemo. So how did the man, who was neither engineer nor computer geek change the world we live in, making us want every product he touched? On graduation day in 2005, a fifty-year-old Steve Jobs said: 'Today I want to tell you three stories from my life, That's it. Just three stories'. The first story is about connecting the dots. My second story is about love and loss. My third story is about death. This is his story...Critically acclaimed author Karen Blumenthal takes us to the core of this complicated and legendary man, from his adoption and early years through to the pinnacles of his career, his dismissal from his duties at Apple (for being too disruptive and difficult) to the graduation where he gave the commencement speech just 6 years before his death, giving life to what were soon to become some of most famous quotes of his career, ending with the message: Stay Hungry.Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life.


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Inventor. Visionary. Genius. Dropout. Adopted. Steve Jobs was the founder of Apple and he was all of these things. Steve Jobs has been described as a showman, artist, tyrant, genius, jerk. Through his life he was loved, hated, admired and dismissed, yet he was a living legend; the genius who founded Apple in his parent's garage when he was just 21 years-old, revolutionisin Inventor. Visionary. Genius. Dropout. Adopted. Steve Jobs was the founder of Apple and he was all of these things. Steve Jobs has been described as a showman, artist, tyrant, genius, jerk. Through his life he was loved, hated, admired and dismissed, yet he was a living legend; the genius who founded Apple in his parent's garage when he was just 21 years-old, revolutionising the music world. He single-handedly introduced the first computer that could sit on your desk and founded and nurtured a company called Pixar bringing to life Oscar wining animations Toy Story and Finding Nemo. So how did the man, who was neither engineer nor computer geek change the world we live in, making us want every product he touched? On graduation day in 2005, a fifty-year-old Steve Jobs said: 'Today I want to tell you three stories from my life, That's it. Just three stories'. The first story is about connecting the dots. My second story is about love and loss. My third story is about death. This is his story...Critically acclaimed author Karen Blumenthal takes us to the core of this complicated and legendary man, from his adoption and early years through to the pinnacles of his career, his dismissal from his duties at Apple (for being too disruptive and difficult) to the graduation where he gave the commencement speech just 6 years before his death, giving life to what were soon to become some of most famous quotes of his career, ending with the message: Stay Hungry.Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life.

30 review for Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different: A Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manal Omar

    I'm stamping this book with 5 stars- which i rarely do- for bias reasons if i may say, tho this does not rule out the author in anyway. An easy and quick read, summarizing the life of the man of our age Steve jobs. I'm considering this book as a starter to get my facts straight and know of the late Apple cofounder better, before truly embarking on a genuine exploration voyage of his life. This book made me just so eager to read Isaacson's, on whom i'm setting very high expectations. As to Jobs himsel I'm stamping this book with 5 stars- which i rarely do- for bias reasons if i may say, tho this does not rule out the author in anyway. An easy and quick read, summarizing the life of the man of our age Steve jobs. I'm considering this book as a starter to get my facts straight and know of the late Apple cofounder better, before truly embarking on a genuine exploration voyage of his life. This book made me just so eager to read Isaacson's, on whom i'm setting very high expectations. As to Jobs himself, i run out of words here, and i prefer to leave this review speechless indeed. speechless is more expressing in my case-now.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” The dots will connect. The journey is the reward. Don’t settle for okay. Just do what’s right. Steve Jobs lived his life by all of these mottos, and encouraged those around him to do the same. In this biography, Karen Blumenthal connects the dots of his life for us, from his beginnings as an adopted child of Clara and Paul Jobs, to a gifted but ornery third grader who created a small explosion underneath his teacher’s chair, to a lost and troubled barefoot college drop “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” The dots will connect. The journey is the reward. Don’t settle for okay. Just do what’s right. Steve Jobs lived his life by all of these mottos, and encouraged those around him to do the same. In this biography, Karen Blumenthal connects the dots of his life for us, from his beginnings as an adopted child of Clara and Paul Jobs, to a gifted but ornery third grader who created a small explosion underneath his teacher’s chair, to a lost and troubled barefoot college dropout who worked for Atari but smelled so bad that they put him on the night shift. How in the world can a man like this go on to build the first Apple computer in his parents’ garage with his friend Steve Wozniak? We go along on Jobs’ journey as he tries to sell the first Apple computer to heading up a business that had sales exceeding $7.9 million by 1978. We learn how he was then fired from the company he founded, how he attempted to found a new computer company called NeXT (whose first computer cost $6500!), how he purchased Pixar and made the first full-length computer animated movie, and ultimately returned to Apple in 1996 when laptops they were building literally burst into flames because of faulty batteries. And later how he would move music from our desktop computers into the palm of our hands. Our world would never be the same. Steve Jobs’ life was a roller coaster, a series of stops and starts and rocket-launches forward. This biography captures all of it. And even though we know a lot of what he’s done, much of the stories still came as a surprise. One lesson that sticks with me is not one from him, but one he learned from his dad: You are building a beautiful wooden cabinet, but do you stick an old piece of plywood on the back because no one can see it? No. You’ll always know there is an old piece of plywood on the back. Don’t settle for okay.

  3. 4 out of 5

    يوسف زهدى

    Mmmm, interesting book, not the official biography but telling Steve Jobs story from early beginning to the end, supported by testimonials and articles. Before this book my relationship with Apple inc. were limited in my friends screaming about how iPhones are great, now I can partially understand how people are amazed about Apple products (however I'm not 100% agreeing with them, but will probably give Apple a try). I admit that I liked Steve before the book, I remember his Stanford 2005 great sp Mmmm, interesting book, not the official biography but telling Steve Jobs story from early beginning to the end, supported by testimonials and articles. Before this book my relationship with Apple inc. were limited in my friends screaming about how iPhones are great, now I can partially understand how people are amazed about Apple products (however I'm not 100% agreeing with them, but will probably give Apple a try). I admit that I liked Steve before the book, I remember his Stanford 2005 great speech about lessons in life (connecting dots, learning from fails, and to stay hungry and stay foolish) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6... Yet after reading about his biography, I sayI liked the book but didn't like Steve Jobs, yes he is passionate, workaholic, innovative person but in his search for perfectionism he was a dirty tyrant in his work who ate others rights, insulted others ideas and one of the worst team players ever!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Wow. What a jerk. I am an Apple user. I bought an iMac back in 2002 (the upside down pot-flat screen version) and upgraded to a MacBookPro in 2009. I also have three iPods-an iTouch that I use now just for audiobooks (since I just got a Samsung smartphone), and a Shuffle and a Nano that I use for running. I like the products a lot. But with all of that, I was never one who was into the cult of personality around Jobs. And now I'm really glad of that. And I kinda have a new appreciation for Bill G Wow. What a jerk. I am an Apple user. I bought an iMac back in 2002 (the upside down pot-flat screen version) and upgraded to a MacBookPro in 2009. I also have three iPods-an iTouch that I use now just for audiobooks (since I just got a Samsung smartphone), and a Shuffle and a Nano that I use for running. I like the products a lot. But with all of that, I was never one who was into the cult of personality around Jobs. And now I'm really glad of that. And I kinda have a new appreciation for Bill Gates. All that said, this was an interesting look at the man's life, and much more reasonable than Isaacson's tome. I do somewhat hesitate to give this to some students for fear that they will take it as permission to emulate Jobs...especially when it comes to hygiene and disregard for others. Blumenthal's writing was engaging. My only issue is that at the end, she seems to ask the reader to disregard all that she has told us. "It would be easy to get hung up on Steve Jobs's quirkiness and to focus on his ugly side" (p. 265). Well, yeah, since that's what the previous 264 pages told us all about. Even at the end, we learn that he agreed to having his biography written so his kids would know him. Ugh. There was little in the book to give us a view of anything else. While he may have been "brilliant--and also flawed" there was nothing to indicate that he was "so amazing" (p.266).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Well, now I don't have to read Isaacson's bio! This book uses that and a lot of other good sources to write a bio of Jobs for a young teen audience. The early parts of Jobs' life I thought were handled tastefully and in a way young teens would get - he was a jerk who seldom showered! No wonder he got fired! I felt his flailing with Next and with Pixar lacked a little context - remember these are kids who never knew a world without Pixar - what did that company mean? Then, when he returns to Appl Well, now I don't have to read Isaacson's bio! This book uses that and a lot of other good sources to write a bio of Jobs for a young teen audience. The early parts of Jobs' life I thought were handled tastefully and in a way young teens would get - he was a jerk who seldom showered! No wonder he got fired! I felt his flailing with Next and with Pixar lacked a little context - remember these are kids who never knew a world without Pixar - what did that company mean? Then, when he returns to Apple, I felt like the book was just a recitation of events and facts, again, that would have benefitted for more context for the audience. Finally, I take great issue with the statement that "Now people know LSD is a dangerous drug, but back then it was common to run into people who had taken it." Really? LSD is currently being used in a variety of scientific studies. As long as there are college students, people will still take LSD. Maybe it was "bigger" in the 60s, but I don't think the popular wisdom has changed a bit since then. That was a very preachy statement put in an otherwise fair book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Jose Blumenthal, K. (2012). Steve Jobs: The man who thought different: a biography. New York: Feiwel and Friends. Genre: Biography Format: Print Selection Process: YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist Steve Jobs: arrogant, insane, relentless genius. As with all brilliant minds of the last century, he had quirks that most could not understand or come to terms with. Blumenthal portrays Jobs as all of this and more in this biography that depicts how one man’s visi Elizabeth Jose Blumenthal, K. (2012). Steve Jobs: The man who thought different: a biography. New York: Feiwel and Friends. Genre: Biography Format: Print Selection Process: YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist Steve Jobs: arrogant, insane, relentless genius. As with all brilliant minds of the last century, he had quirks that most could not understand or come to terms with. Blumenthal portrays Jobs as all of this and more in this biography that depicts how one man’s vision (or, depending on how you look at it, the tweaking of others’ ideas) brought about change to everyday life in modern day society. Using the commencement speech that Jobs gave to the graduating class at Stanford University in 2005, the author elaborates on three main stories that he shared that day: the importance of 1) connecting the dots in life, 2) love and loss, and 3) death (Blumenthal, 2012). The first section dealt with Jobs’ search and drive for meaning and perfection in his early years, while ruthlessly cutting down everyone in his path to achieve it. Despite many, many technological flops before the path to what Apple is today, he pressed on to capture his vision for a clean, streamlined product line that provided a personal experience. The second section was a little more personal, as it discussed his private family & love life in more detail, as well as the sense of loss he suffered when he was fired from Apple. To conclude the book, the author delved into the last major phase of Jobs’ life when he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and faced certain death. Readers interested in material having depth and meaning will be fascinated by Jobs’ life story. With an enormous amount of detail that naturally goes into a biography, Blumenthal manages to successfully paint a portrait of a lunatic who seems to be quite ingenious and revolutionary for his time. Though the first third of the book is a bit tedious to read due to high technical content, the second and last third are more gripping, as they address issues that are close to Jobs’ personal life, including the internal struggles he faced as a father, boyfriend, husband, businessman, trendsetter, and cancer patient. By focusing on the contents of his 2005 commencement speech, the author gracefully summates the highlights of the technological giant’s life and has captured the legacy and vision he leaves behind. Recommended. Reference: Blumenthal, K. (2012). Steve Jobs: The man who thought different: a biography. New York: Feiwel and Friends.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    "Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different" by Karen Blumenthal is a biography that demonstrates how Jobs overcame his struggles to follow his dreams. When Steve Jobs was adopted because his bilogical parents were too young to take care of him, he was expected to live with a wealthy family to guarantee him an opportunity to go to college. However, Jobs was raised by people who could barely get by, only allowed to keep Steve after they promised that he would go to college. When he grew up, he was "Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different" by Karen Blumenthal is a biography that demonstrates how Jobs overcame his struggles to follow his dreams. When Steve Jobs was adopted because his bilogical parents were too young to take care of him, he was expected to live with a wealthy family to guarantee him an opportunity to go to college. However, Jobs was raised by people who could barely get by, only allowed to keep Steve after they promised that he would go to college. When he grew up, he was set on Reed college and wouldn't go anywhere else. His parents had a hard time paying for the tuition. He dropped out of college and had his own ideas. Today, he's remembered as a great leader of Aplle and an exceptionally gifted person. He's brought new and great technology to our world and left a great legacy. But how did he achieve so much if hedropped out of college? You're going to have to read the book to find out!!! This biography gives a lot of information about Jobs in a way that is understandable, formal, amd at the same time, still very interesting. I learned a lot and had fun at the same time. This book was the finalist in the Excellence In Young Adult Nonfiction competition. Bluementhal did a great job with the writing style and made nonfiction exciting and with deep meaning. This book is a must-read for everyone. This book not only informs you about Steve Jobs but it also motivates you to work hard for your own goal and follow your own dream. I strongly recommend this outstanding book!!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Homeschoolmama

    I picked this book up during our vacation. I'd wanted to read a book about Jobs for awhile now, and just couldn't bring myself to do it, for some reason. Maybe because my son is often making disparaging remarks about how stingy Jobs was, and unreasonable... and nasty... um, well, all of that is true! But despite Jobs personality flaws, he was a fascinating character. Creative, driven, obsessive and brilliant. I like reading about quirky people who manage to be successful even though they are abr I picked this book up during our vacation. I'd wanted to read a book about Jobs for awhile now, and just couldn't bring myself to do it, for some reason. Maybe because my son is often making disparaging remarks about how stingy Jobs was, and unreasonable... and nasty... um, well, all of that is true! But despite Jobs personality flaws, he was a fascinating character. Creative, driven, obsessive and brilliant. I like reading about quirky people who manage to be successful even though they are abrasive and lack social graces. And have weird habits. Blumenthal writes about him well, using plenty of dialogue and scenarios to give you a good picture of what Jobs was really like. I loved seeing the old photographs of him too, and reading about how the various Apple products started out. And Blumenthal was kind when it came to writing about technology; she didn't get too complicated and so it was easy for the average person to understand. Walter Isaacson wrote a much lengthier authorized bio of Jobs, but this one was perfect for me.. Good for those of us who are just a bit curious and don't need 600+ pages to learn about Jobs.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Noran Negm

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book taught me that steve jobs was human but at the same time he wasn't. He was a fool and a genius at the same time. Although he didn't know much about electronics and technology, he managed to revolutionize an entire industry of it. His ability to see the potential and the future in an object was astonishing. Steve is a great thinker, but he's chaotic and often unrealistic. But, maybe that's what made him so successful. He saw something and made it happen, no matter what it takes. Steve do This book taught me that steve jobs was human but at the same time he wasn't. He was a fool and a genius at the same time. Although he didn't know much about electronics and technology, he managed to revolutionize an entire industry of it. His ability to see the potential and the future in an object was astonishing. Steve is a great thinker, but he's chaotic and often unrealistic. But, maybe that's what made him so successful. He saw something and made it happen, no matter what it takes. Steve does lack in the cognitive department. At least in his early years, he failed to create strong relationships and was cold and came by as uncaring. It's nice to see him take a turn for the better. However, I fell that Jobs is a bit over credited. I mean, yes he pushed people to create his amazing products, but all the credit isn't his. He was the key to all of this but so many people worked very hard to create those products and I feel they should be given just as much credit. This book really tells you how Steve was: not entirely evil and not entirely good either.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexandro Sanchez

    In my opinion this book was great! It included the biography of one of the most successful men that ever lived in the electronic industry. It showed and explained what Jobs did to overcome all of his problems and how he made Apple the great big company that is known worldwide. Of course he had issues with Apple but that's why he was a part of other big companies known as Pixar, NeXT, and of course Apple. After several decades Jobs became rich and wealthy but at the time he had found out he had a In my opinion this book was great! It included the biography of one of the most successful men that ever lived in the electronic industry. It showed and explained what Jobs did to overcome all of his problems and how he made Apple the great big company that is known worldwide. Of course he had issues with Apple but that's why he was a part of other big companies known as Pixar, NeXT, and of course Apple. After several decades Jobs became rich and wealthy but at the time he had found out he had a tumor in his organisms. This book is great, I recommend to anyone that'll take the time to read it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    JAM

    For a biography this is a good book, but for who it is about it brought the rating down. I liked this book but I just don't like the person it's about. He was extremely mean and rude, but I liked his determination for perfection. Don't know if I would recommend this book though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Loved this book! Fascinated by such an intriguing visionary.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rayman

    The book Steve Jobs: The man who thought different is truly an insight of a man who against all odds was able to succeed and still be relevant today. We start as Steve Jobs is born to parents who were not married and had complications so, therefore, he is put up for adoption and is adopted into a family of Clara and Paul. He grew up and often was seen as cold and uncaring for relationships. He originally wanted to go to college but could not keep up with the tuition payment and later didn't see The book Steve Jobs: The man who thought different is truly an insight of a man who against all odds was able to succeed and still be relevant today. We start as Steve Jobs is born to parents who were not married and had complications so, therefore, he is put up for adoption and is adopted into a family of Clara and Paul. He grew up and often was seen as cold and uncaring for relationships. He originally wanted to go to college but could not keep up with the tuition payment and later didn't see the purpose so he eventually dropped out. He then started a company with his friend after being a part-time worker at Atari. We then see the transition from barely making ends meet to overnight success. We see apple continues to foster growth but has a power struggle which leads to Jobs losing management duties and resigning from the company. He then founded NeXT, and later went on to make the first computer-animated film, which was a hit. He later returned to Apple after NeXT was bought. He then changed music forever through the handheld, however, began being seriously affected by his Cancer. The book was divided into three parts and the last part focuses on his fight with pancreatic cancer. It shows the effect on the people around him and the outcry of hundreds after he died. The second part showed Steve's personal life. Steve was so relentless that when he found out that his college girlfriend was pregnant he left and did not reconnect with his daughter until she was a young adult. I personally liked the book as it gave a realistic view of an icon. The book used a sort of dramatic irony as the reader had the hint Steve was dying of Pancreatic Cancer but the media and fans were informed that he is doing "better than ever". I would recommend this book to people who want to see the history of the essential item in our lives.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Haik

    I re-read this book over the winter and man, just as great as the first time. I think this book is a great way to outline the life of Steve Jobs. The book details his childhood and how he was a troubled student and an orphan, then moves on to his teen years. The book spends the most time talking about the formation of Apple and the different devices/products that were made before the official idea of "Apple". We get a detailed explanation of many of Steve Jobs's and Steve Wozniak's creations. Th I re-read this book over the winter and man, just as great as the first time. I think this book is a great way to outline the life of Steve Jobs. The book details his childhood and how he was a troubled student and an orphan, then moves on to his teen years. The book spends the most time talking about the formation of Apple and the different devices/products that were made before the official idea of "Apple". We get a detailed explanation of many of Steve Jobs's and Steve Wozniak's creations. The book ultimately ends with the death of Steve from his cancer. A great book for people who want a general knowledge of Jobs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kian Haghighi

    Steve Jobs:The Man Who Thought Different is a great biography of the man who built Apple, Steve Jobs. The book follows Steve’s ideas through high school, college, and finally through his career. Not only does the book show what he did, but also why he did what he did. That part of the book is more important for readers then what he did and showed a full picture of who Steve Jobs was.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Seif

    Although this book wasn’t made by the original autobiographer, it was easy to read and was very engaging. It has lots of advice that you can adopt in your personality and learn from Steve. You wont be able to be like Jobs, but you can learn from him. “Stay hungry, stay foolish”

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    An adult view of Steve's life. Very different from the kid biography and I learned a lot more.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brenton

    Really insightful and hard to put down. A life and journey that is just wonderful plus changed the landscape.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

    The book was good although some parts were a little hard to read. The way the author went in to detail and how much detail got real boring real quick. But if you are a "techy" then you might understand these parts better. If you like computer science books then this might be the book for you. I am kind of what they call a "techy" and it was even a little boring for me. It all depends on if you like an actual story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    CoryS

    Steve Jobs is known as one of the most successful people of our age. To me he had always been just a ripoff Bill Gates, so I decided it was time I actually learned what made him so special. Jobs was the child of a couple that wasn’t capable of giving him the care he would need so they gave him to the Job’s family with the promise that Steve would end up going to college.Steve was the only child of his adoptive parents. His father would instill within him his drive for perfection in the products Steve Jobs is known as one of the most successful people of our age. To me he had always been just a ripoff Bill Gates, so I decided it was time I actually learned what made him so special. Jobs was the child of a couple that wasn’t capable of giving him the care he would need so they gave him to the Job’s family with the promise that Steve would end up going to college.Steve was the only child of his adoptive parents. His father would instill within him his drive for perfection in the products he made. In school he managed to skip a year and befriended another genius, Wozniak. Wozniak and Steve together made an excellent team, making money selling illegal “blue boxes.” During this time period Steve starting to develop his odd eating habits. You’d think there's only so much that can go wrong with your diet till Jobs uses it as a excuse to not bath himself. Eventually Wozniak and Steve started Apple, in the Jobs family garage, after Steve dropped out of collage. They would make the apple computer, which would sell well enough for them to expand. They made several new products with steve, until the board could no longer tolerate Steve’s drive for perfection, in absolutely everything. Jobs would on to start another computer company as well as buy pixar from george lucas. He would help to revolutionize the way movies would be animated with them. Eventually Steve made his way back to a falling apple, only to pull a miracle with the creation of the IMac. He would revolutionize the music field, and with it the phone industry. Poetically ending in the industry where he began. He would eventually die of cancer do to his resistance to aid that was being thrown his way. When he finally gave in to the Surgery it had spread to other organs signifying the his doom. This book had a very interesting personality to which the story of Jobs was told. I quite enjoyed reading the way Jobs and the people around had creative ways of analyzing all the little things that happened. These were sprinkled throughout the rest of the story when the oddities would reappear. My only criticism of the book is the way they kept going back to one particular speech from Jobs. While I understand how it helps move the plot forward, I got quite tired of it by the end of the story. It seemed to me that at least every other paragraph began with jobs giving a speech at that one particular college graduation, and this struck me as rather lazy. Overall, I quite liked it, even if parts were a bit repetitive. Definitely worth at least one read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robbie

    good

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Forster

    I'm writing this review on my MacBook Pro, whilst listening to music on iTunes. My iPhone sits beside me and my mum is currently using my iPad. I love Apple products and I use them everyday - in fact, I'd feel lost without them. Most of you will either own at least one of Apple's products, or know somebody who does. Even if you don't, you surely must've watched or heard of a Pixar film, such as Toy Story or Finding Nemo. It's pretty clear what sort of impact that Apple and Pixar have had on the I'm writing this review on my MacBook Pro, whilst listening to music on iTunes. My iPhone sits beside me and my mum is currently using my iPad. I love Apple products and I use them everyday - in fact, I'd feel lost without them. Most of you will either own at least one of Apple's products, or know somebody who does. Even if you don't, you surely must've watched or heard of a Pixar film, such as Toy Story or Finding Nemo. It's pretty clear what sort of impact that Apple and Pixar have had on the world of technology today. I'm a huge fan of Apple, and as soon as I heard of the biography, entitled Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson, I really wanted to pick it up and read all about the company. However, as much of a fan as I am, there was, to simply put it, no way that I was going to read a 600-750 page biography. The book is huge and I'm afraid that I just wouldn't have the patience to read it all - I was intimidated by it. When I was told by Bloomsbury that Karen Blumenthal had written a biography that was aimed at the 'iPhone texting, white-headphone-listening, iTunes downloading generation', I absolutely pounced at the chance to read it. At a much more digestible 320 pages (including photographs) and straight to the point, this gave me just the insight that I wanted into Steve Jobs and Apple's life. I admit that at the start of the book, I wasn't really getting into it. I think that this was partly because I was learning things that I didn't really know about Jobs - he certainly had a bit of a dark side and was quite fiery, but not in a very good way. I think that it's fantastic that Blumenthal did include all of those harsher details though, as it helped me to get to know what Jobs was really like behind the scenes. I went from somebody that, before opening the book, admired Jobs and his creativity, to taking quite a strong dislike to him. However, I came to understand that he was young, he had a strong personality and was determined. Although he wasn't always the most socially acceptable, he had faith in himself and what he was doing, something to admire. I'm glad to say that when I hit the half-way part of the book, I had learnt why he was acting the way he did and began to honour him a lot more. I felt as though Blumenthal was giving him a fair representation, showing both his good and bad sides - of course nobody is perfect. I thought it was really interesting to see how both Jobs and his companies progressed. It was inspiring to see that although Jobs did hit a lot of difficulties, he still kept going and wasn't afraid to take many risks. I also learned a whole lot things that I had no idea about before reading the biography, some facts were really quite surprising. Alongside the facts about business and technology, particularly towards the end, we learned more about how Jobs dealt with the news of his very poor health and the fact that he had cancer - it was incredibly heartfelt, and I was shedding a tear by the end. It's so sad that such a hugely creative mind is no longer with us, but through learning about him and his products, I'm sure that Apple will still have even more genius to unveil. Steve Jobs once said "Your time is limited... have the courage to follow your heart and intuition" - no other words could be more appropriate to his actions in his, sadly shortened, life. Blumenthal has done his story justice though, and has certainly made me want to abide by his words of "stay hungry, stay foolish." A fantastic biography, for both teenagers and adults alike, that I'd recommend to anyone wanting to learn more about Jobs, Apple and/or Pixar.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    This was a book bought for me by my grandmother because she knew I liked non-fiction, and thought that reading the story of Steve Jobs would be inspiring, but inspired was not the reaction that this book gave me. This book made me absolutely abhor Steve Jobs, from what I read he seemed like a greedy self centered man that knows little about computers and just happened to be in the right place at the right time. For starters he created none of the architecture for the apple computers all of the w This was a book bought for me by my grandmother because she knew I liked non-fiction, and thought that reading the story of Steve Jobs would be inspiring, but inspired was not the reaction that this book gave me. This book made me absolutely abhor Steve Jobs, from what I read he seemed like a greedy self centered man that knows little about computers and just happened to be in the right place at the right time. For starters he created none of the architecture for the apple computers all of the work was done by Wozniak, he was the one who approached Steve with the idea of creating computers and he knew that Steve had previously sold equipment to steal cable to other students, and that Steve might know if anyone might want a computer. Steve's claim to fame in starting the company is that he borrowed cash from his parents, and let Woz work in his garage. The actual programming for the apple 2 was based off of a operating system that Bill gates designed for the apple 1 that he published because the original apple did not come with an operating system installed. Once the apple 2 took of Steve was able to partner with John Sculley who ran all of the business interactions of apple. They ended up relegating Steve to the creative design team. When he ended up on the team Steve wanted the apple 3 to be as small and sleek as possible which caused the apple 3 to not come with any on-board memory like it was originally designed, and not even a built in port for a floppy disks, which meant if you wanted to save anything like for example the operating system for the computer you had to buy an external device from a third party developer. These trends continue and Steve gets fired from apple. He ended up investing what he made in apple into a company that would become today's Pixar, but the book specifically details how Jobs had no direct involvement with the company other than funding. On a personal front Jobs did not do any better, he ended up having a child with a college girlfriend and upon finding out she was pregnant left her. He did not end up establishing a stable relationship with his daughter until she was a young adult. Overall I did find the book very interesting because it gave me a different view on Steve Jobs, it is one I do not think the author intended but it is the on I came to when presented with the facts.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amit Sarker

    Steve Jobs, a man who thought different was truly an amazing book to read. It talks about how one adopted youth who was a hippie and relied heavily on drugs had decided to create one of the world’s most innovating things in the world. The book really transforms his biography into a compelling story which makes you feel as if you’re in the story yourself. I think that the book should be read by many people because it allows me to think about how this could possibly relate to my life and how at so Steve Jobs, a man who thought different was truly an amazing book to read. It talks about how one adopted youth who was a hippie and relied heavily on drugs had decided to create one of the world’s most innovating things in the world. The book really transforms his biography into a compelling story which makes you feel as if you’re in the story yourself. I think that the book should be read by many people because it allows me to think about how this could possibly relate to my life and how at some point, I could be alert on what I’m doing, and not end up what Steve Jobs did. However, the book at some point even inspired. It really wanted me to make new innovations myself and I really wanted to focus my career on that. Although the story focuses on the biography of Steve Jobs itself, the way its written and wrapped around his life clearly makes me so inspired and willingness to want to do what he did. To be honest, the author’s words really made me feel as if I was in the story because the author so descriptive. In some cases, the author would say the colors and the captions of what the room looked like. And in some way, it appeared as if the book itself was a third person diary of Steve Jobs. Everything seems to be so professional and real in the book. The author seems to have much knowledge in this genius man and really wanted to express his writing fluently so that we can understand. I also like the writing style of the author because the author in some sense made it seem as if without Steve Jobs, so much could’ve never happened and really took the time to explain that. Although there were negative points in Steve Jobs’s career, the author always tried to look for some way to turn that idea around, and make it into an inspiring moment. Some really good examples that I liked which the author used was when Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak made an illegal black box which would allow someone to make international calls without paying for it. This should’ve clearly been a negative point for some people, but in my opinion, the author says that this was such a genius tool that Jobs used and used that example to support her writing.l Overall, I really liked the book and clearly recommend it to people who have the chance to read it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I began this book intrigued by the public's fascination with this man and the products he popularized and completed it just as puzzled, if not more. The author clearly describes the deep contradictions within the man, and while, a case can be made that he changed the music, film, and communications industry, I suppose, I also found myself wondering why, in some respects, I should care. I guess I'm somewhat of a Luddite in that I don't need to have access to music and the latest Web news or email I began this book intrigued by the public's fascination with this man and the products he popularized and completed it just as puzzled, if not more. The author clearly describes the deep contradictions within the man, and while, a case can be made that he changed the music, film, and communications industry, I suppose, I also found myself wondering why, in some respects, I should care. I guess I'm somewhat of a Luddite in that I don't need to have access to music and the latest Web news or email at every moment of the day, and I wonder about so much acclaim being given to someone who popularized all the technology upon which so many of us now rely. What does it mean? Of what significance is all this? The frame for this biography about Steve Jobs, the man who became the face of Apple, is a 2005 commencement speech he gave at Stanford. The author weaves in information around the three stories he told to the graduates at that ceremony, leaving readers to decide for themselves how they feel about the man. As successful as Jobs was in his business efforts, he also experienced failures, and had to overcome challenges. It's never quite clear--other than his having been adopted--what formed his unique personality and drive to succeed and to control so many aspects of the company he was trying to run. As it becomes clear that he is dying despite his best efforts to keep the cancer at bay or to simply deny its existence, I wondered about the ethics of a company keeping secret the health of its leader. I wondered, too, about what would make someone become more interested in his work than his immediate family, and wished there had been more of those elements explored in this book. Still, some of this man's philosophy resonates with me: "Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life..." Ah, yes, and I would add: "Don't waste it trying to please everyone around you." Teen readers will enjoy reading this title and trying to tease out this man's motivations and understand his personality while smiling at the black and white photographs of the young Jobs.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ye

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I originally picked out this book because I was interested in how Bill Gates stole the apple software. What this book most impressed me is that it really shows Steve Jobs' life in the form of his Stanford commencement speech. The book first started out with describing the 3 stories he said in his Stanford commencement speech. The book is divided into 3 parts, each for the story he gave at the commencement speech. The first part is on how he spent his childhood and he built Apple. The second pa I originally picked out this book because I was interested in how Bill Gates stole the apple software. What this book most impressed me is that it really shows Steve Jobs' life in the form of his Stanford commencement speech. The book first started out with describing the 3 stories he said in his Stanford commencement speech. The book is divided into 3 parts, each for the story he gave at the commencement speech. The first part is on how he spent his childhood and he built Apple. The second part is on how he was fired from Apple and he he started NeXT and his family.The third part was on how he got cancer and how his legacy remains. The first part showed hoe Steve Jobs wasn't a typical teenager and how he was an iconoclast from the beginning of his childhood. He was a trouble maker and without proper guidance he would have never succeeded. "'I'm one hundred percent sure that if it hadn't been for Mrs.Hills in fourth grade and a few others, I would absolutely have ended up in jail'"(13,Blumenthal). The second part showed how he started NeXT and how he redeemed himself from getting fired from Apple. "Without Apple, Jobs was shaken and devastated, unsure what to do next. But then, he said, "'Something slowly began to dawn on me: I still loved what I did'" ( 134, Blumenthal). But then disaster turned opportunity, for Jobs he started 2 struggling companies which would later on be 2 of the greatest companies in the world. The third part showed me how he deals with himself. He controls a lot of things: Apple, money,and his employees, but the one thing he can't control is his cancer. He did anything but the surgery. Even when he was almost dead he didn't mellow down. He still yelled at his employees did everything he used to. All of his life makes him into a : inventor, visionary, iconoclast, genius, adopted, dropout, and fired. Steve Jobs taught me that you should do what you love and don't give up on it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Individuality, The Trait That Changed Things Adopted, dropout, fired, genius, iconoclast, inventor, visionary, these seven words appear on the back cover of Steve Jobs the Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal and they represent and describe Steve Jobs the creator, founder, and leader of Apple computer. Before reading, I thought this book would be about Steve Jobs and his legacy and works throughout his lifetime that revolved around creating some of the most popular and used devices today Individuality, The Trait That Changed Things Adopted, dropout, fired, genius, iconoclast, inventor, visionary, these seven words appear on the back cover of Steve Jobs the Man Who Thought Different by Karen Blumenthal and they represent and describe Steve Jobs the creator, founder, and leader of Apple computer. Before reading, I thought this book would be about Steve Jobs and his legacy and works throughout his lifetime that revolved around creating some of the most popular and used devices today. Though the biography is about those topics, in the book you also see various different sides of Steve Jobs through his life and his struggles that he faced with relation to his company Apple, but also his personal struggles with family and health, and coworkers. The fact that the author wrote the book so we get to view all aspects of Jobs life even the bad parts makes the book very interesting. I encourage others to definitely read this book! Although the technology terminology and conversations can get a bit confusing and in my opinion boring overall the book is a great read because it tells inspiring rags to riches story that conveys many positive messages like to be your own person, and if at first you don’t succeed, try again. Steve Jobs the Man Who Thought Different embodies the importance of individuality. Steve Jobs was always different than others, even at a young age. In school he refused to follow instructions or be told what to do, he always wanted to do things his own way. Jobs’ teachers discouraged him for not acting like all the other kids, and his peers bullied him. However, what makes Jobs different than others makes him special and ultimately successful because he thought differently then other technology businesses. Steve Jobs developed various features that were never done before like creating various digital typefaces, the iPhone, a phone with just a screen and no buttons, Pixar, a company that creates computer-animated movies and more. This quote from the book was the script in Apple’s “Think Different” commercial, “Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. While some see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do” (Blumenthal 191). This quote though talking about Apple being revolutionary I think also perfectly fits in with Jobs’s life. Jobs was different, he wanted everything to be his way, every detail on every device he created to be perfect, and these different personality traits helped Jobs create unheard of creations and revolutionized the world. This shows readers that you should never want to be like anyone else because the best person you can be is you which is a great message. Success never comes easily, this is shown time and time again throughout the book when Jobs is trying to create devices and they have issues, do not work properly, or are poorly received by the public. However every time Jobs got knocked down or set back he got back up and tried again. For example, after the Apple II came out they created the Apple III also nicknamed the Lisa. The computer came out late and had a design issue where some users were complaining that their chips were not secure. Apple came out with a fix that was short term and was humiliating to the company. Though the Apple III was a predicament and shameful experience for Apple that did not discourage Jobs and the rest of Apple to give up, the moved past it and tried again “…The Apple III was a dud that never sold well…Jobs dearly wanted to run the Lisa project”(95 Blumenthal). Although the computer was a fail it only made Jobs want to fix it and and produce a new version even more. This is not the only time Steve faced a setback “The Macintosh had made a huge splash in the computer world just as technology’s boy wonder had turned thirty. Then, he said, ‘I got fired’” (Blumenthal 133). This quote from the book is the part during Jobs commencement speech when he told the future graduates about how he got fired from Apple, the company he had founded and worked on for 10 years. Jobs, clearly was devastated. He had hired a guy to work for him that eventually fired him and took away his company. Did this stop Steve Jobs? No. Jobs created a new company called Next and purchased a system called Pixar that was computer graphics equipment. Both the companies struggled for a while but eventually Pixar developed animation and partnered with Disney to create Toy Story which was a huge success making 29 million dollars the first weekend and eventually many other movies. Jobs had helped Pixar become a strong company. As for Next, the company was eventually bought ironically by Apple. Apple needed a company that could bring better software after its recent and public troubles with developing new products that worked well and Next provided just that. Apple paid 400 million dollars for Next, but they did not view it as just getting software. This was a package deal and along with the software they were getting Steve Jobs to return to Apple. Imagine if Jobs after he got fired just gave up, it would have been so easy to quit, but he didn’t. Jobs knew he had a passion for what he did so although he faced many hardships he never gave up and look what happened. In the end Jobs got reunited with Apple, created various successful devices millions of people use every day, revolutionized technology, developed 2 other successful companies and more. Steve Jobs The Man Who Thought Different is a powerful and empowering story about a man who revolutionized technology as we know it and all highs and lows throughout the way. Everyone should read this book because in life you will always be faced with hardships but you cannot be defeated by your losses you have to move on and learn from them just like Steve Jobs displays throughout this entire biography. “Steve Jobs, he trusted that the dots would connect. He believed the reward is the journey. He followed his heart. He didn't settle for okay. He did what he loved. And if he didn't love what he did, if didn't believe it was a great work, he redid it again and again…” (267 Blumenthal). This quote talks about how Steve Jobs followed his heart and pursued his passion. How he turned left when others were trying to force him to go right. Jobs colored outside the lines. He broke the rules. He changed all of our lives as we know it. He was different, he did amazing things. What will you do?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vinuoc C.

    I started reading this book after selecting it from the bookshelf in the ELA classroom. As Steve Jobs was a very inspiring person to me, I started reading the book, and it proved to be very interesting. In the biography, I was mostly interested by the entire timeline, especially parts describing his friendships and collaborations with his friends and buddies who were also interested in the same topics as him. However, the sections of the story, in my opinion, were very tedious and the repetition I started reading this book after selecting it from the bookshelf in the ELA classroom. As Steve Jobs was a very inspiring person to me, I started reading the book, and it proved to be very interesting. In the biography, I was mostly interested by the entire timeline, especially parts describing his friendships and collaborations with his friends and buddies who were also interested in the same topics as him. However, the sections of the story, in my opinion, were very tedious and the repetition of these sections made computer talk seem like a reward for the few pages of his family life. One of the interesting parts of the book were The author showed Steve Jobs' life with symbolism of the revolution he led in the 1990's and 2000's using Jobs' personality; "a genius, a jerk, a perfectionist, a know-it-all, a friend, a competitor. (pg. 162)" The author uses a different tone to match every part of the story, and it was very well written, even if the story got repetitive at times. The plot line shows the change in Steve Jobs, both in his body and mind. The end of the story shows great regret for Steve Jobs' decision which ended his life, where he chose to ignore his pancreas cancer based on his mentality that "just like he went out of his way his entire career to make sure customers couldn't tinker with his products, he went out of his way to avoid doctors tinkering with his body. (pg. 233)" After finally getting a liver transplant, the disease had spread and it was too late for him to do anything. The book shows great sadness and depression, revealing pictures of loyal fans who placed flowers, iPhones and iPads outside of his home. Overall, this story was very grasping and had a great plot and mood, keeping the pages turning. The story shows more to Jobs than you see from the eye.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul-Kaan Chulliat

    My first book was called “Steve Jobs”, I think it was not too hard to know what it talks about, Steve Jobs. So who is Steve Jobs and why did I choose this book? Steve Jobs is the creator of Apple. I decided to read this book because I like the make Apple and because I saw a movie about Steve Jobs which was named “Jobs”, that movie was very interesting, so I decided to read a book about it, and it turned out to be very interesting, because it was talking about the same thing but with more detail My first book was called “Steve Jobs”, I think it was not too hard to know what it talks about, Steve Jobs. So who is Steve Jobs and why did I choose this book? Steve Jobs is the creator of Apple. I decided to read this book because I like the make Apple and because I saw a movie about Steve Jobs which was named “Jobs”, that movie was very interesting, so I decided to read a book about it, and it turned out to be very interesting, because it was talking about the same thing but with more details, that helped me understand better. I wanted to say that it is a very good book, very interesting book, but some people or should I say most people that already know a little about him might want to skip the first chapters, which I did, I skipped about 2 to 3 chapters, and that action made me want to continue, otherwise I might have stopped which would have been a great mistake. An other thing about the book being possibly boring is the part where they start talking about Jobs daughter.It has more to do with family and way less with computers and business but it is still interesting. Personally that did not really catch my attention as much, because I was more interested in the computer and business part of the book, but I still read it because the movie I saw did not talk about that very much so I wanted to know a bit more. What I realy liked in this book is how they talk about arguing, and being in the middle of debates. I love arguing and debating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leonard

    I chose to read the book Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different because it is a book about Steve Jobs and because it describes him as “fired” and “dropout” on the back. One thing that impressed me was the characters. The book describes how all the characters that affected Jobs’ life in great detail, explaining how they started to when they left his life. On page 12 and 13, it describes how one teacher, Mrs. Imogene Hill helped transform Steve. “Within a few weeks of having Jobs in her class, I chose to read the book Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different because it is a book about Steve Jobs and because it describes him as “fired” and “dropout” on the back. One thing that impressed me was the characters. The book describes how all the characters that affected Jobs’ life in great detail, explaining how they started to when they left his life. On page 12 and 13, it describes how one teacher, Mrs. Imogene Hill helped transform Steve. “Within a few weeks of having Jobs in her class, Mrs. Hill had sized up her unusual student. She offered Jobs a sweet bargain: If he could finish a math workbook on his own and get at least 80 percent right, she would give him five dollars and a giant lollipop … ‘I’m one hundred percent sure that if it hadn’t been for Mrs. Hill and a few others, I would absolutely have ended up in jail,’ he said later” This shows how one very simple person, like Mrs. Hill, a teacher, affected Jobs because she taught him how to be interested in school. She also changed his life by changing Jobs from a “bad” student who would end up in jail to a person who would accomplish many difficult things. Before I read this part, I thought, “At this rate Jobs would not have had a nice career. So how did he?” When I read this part, however, everything made sense. This book helps explain how people you associate with can change you to become a person that is the exact opposite with something that are not important in other people’s lives.

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