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Battleground Iraq: Journal of a Company Commander

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This gripping journal of a company commander from 2003 to early 2004 in some of the most dangerous areas of post-Hussein Iraq discusses tactics, techniques, and procedures as they evolved in the struggle to maintain order and rebuild the country. The journal tells of the dichotomy of combat operations versus nation building. It vividly captures the stresses of combat and c This gripping journal of a company commander from 2003 to early 2004 in some of the most dangerous areas of post-Hussein Iraq discusses tactics, techniques, and procedures as they evolved in the struggle to maintain order and rebuild the country. The journal tells of the dichotomy of combat operations versus nation building. It vividly captures the stresses of combat and corresponding emotions as they accumulate over time in a combat outfit. It reinforces the ideal of camaraderie among soldiers and deals with the emotional impact of losing friends in battle. Understanding these could prove invaluable to those who courageously serve our nation and will continue to endure them in this and future conflicts.


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This gripping journal of a company commander from 2003 to early 2004 in some of the most dangerous areas of post-Hussein Iraq discusses tactics, techniques, and procedures as they evolved in the struggle to maintain order and rebuild the country. The journal tells of the dichotomy of combat operations versus nation building. It vividly captures the stresses of combat and c This gripping journal of a company commander from 2003 to early 2004 in some of the most dangerous areas of post-Hussein Iraq discusses tactics, techniques, and procedures as they evolved in the struggle to maintain order and rebuild the country. The journal tells of the dichotomy of combat operations versus nation building. It vividly captures the stresses of combat and corresponding emotions as they accumulate over time in a combat outfit. It reinforces the ideal of camaraderie among soldiers and deals with the emotional impact of losing friends in battle. Understanding these could prove invaluable to those who courageously serve our nation and will continue to endure them in this and future conflicts.

42 review for Battleground Iraq: Journal of a Company Commander

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Personal journal of a company commander in Iraq from 2003-2004. Full of fighting, heat and "Groundhog Days." (Days like the movie where you wake up and do the exact same thing over and over again.) Why I started this book: Downloaded the RBDigital App and this book before our library training. Why I finished it: Compelling narrative. I binged it in under 24 hours. So interesting to read a first hand account from the very beginning of the Iraq War. Personal journal of a company commander in Iraq from 2003-2004. Full of fighting, heat and "Groundhog Days." (Days like the movie where you wake up and do the exact same thing over and over again.) Why I started this book: Downloaded the RBDigital App and this book before our library training. Why I finished it: Compelling narrative. I binged it in under 24 hours. So interesting to read a first hand account from the very beginning of the Iraq War.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

    My son (Army ROTC) may be in Battleground Afghanistan in a few years. Captain Brown's obsession with cleanliness, physical training, field practice, and what's for dinner were instructive. His frank observations about the impact of a democratic military on a tribal society were informative. The losses he and his unit suffered in one year were eye-opening. His diary is my introduction to 21st century war, a see-saw between the boring "groundhog days" of laying about and the terror-anger-controlle My son (Army ROTC) may be in Battleground Afghanistan in a few years. Captain Brown's obsession with cleanliness, physical training, field practice, and what's for dinner were instructive. His frank observations about the impact of a democratic military on a tribal society were informative. The losses he and his unit suffered in one year were eye-opening. His diary is my introduction to 21st century war, a see-saw between the boring "groundhog days" of laying about and the terror-anger-controlled violence of being hunted, hunting and killing--and then having diplomatic teas with the population that has come to respect you through fear. I can only hope that my son will negotiate the confusions, conundrums and disparities of war with as sane an eye as Captain Brown's.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    Around ANZAC Day (Australian New Zealand Army Corps), the Australian equivalent to America's Memorial Day, I like to attend the local march and service as well as read a book related generally to war. Granted, I don't limit myself to only Australian material - rather I read anything that, to extend the concept, helps me think about not just the Aussies but the Allied forces in general. This time, with Battleground Iraq, I read about Captain Todd S. Brown, of the U.S. Army is Iraq (primarily Sama Around ANZAC Day (Australian New Zealand Army Corps), the Australian equivalent to America's Memorial Day, I like to attend the local march and service as well as read a book related generally to war. Granted, I don't limit myself to only Australian material - rather I read anything that, to extend the concept, helps me think about not just the Aussies but the Allied forces in general. This time, with Battleground Iraq, I read about Captain Todd S. Brown, of the U.S. Army is Iraq (primarily Samarra) during 2003-04. Brown captures both the chaos and the mundanity of modern-day conflict in the Middle East. With a great sense of humour and generally good moral judgement, his journal tells a very vivid and engaging story of a bunch of guys over the other side of the world, fighting a people they will never understand. Often times, it was refreshingly "un-PC". He doesn't hold back in expressing his disgust at the practices of particularly the Iraqi male renegades. Nor does he keep to himself, his disagreement with the whole "hearts and mind" argument in rebuilding the country. "The only thing these people understand is violence," he continues to assert. All round, this provided an unapologetically honest look into the U.S. forces fighting in the Middle East. Knowing how much has changed since then, how much even the necessity of that invasion in the first place has been called into question, makes the book all the more dramtically ironic.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    The seemingly inexhaustible use of military lingo, the wisdom clearly earned in combat, the efforts to make inroads with Iraqis, and the enduring humor despite the tragic costs of war all combine impressively upon the reader. One does get a sense of the shaping of the mind of a military commander.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Clear and disturbing insight into the realities of Iraq in 2004. Makes you reflect on how tragically mismatched the tools, training and tasking where to the mission of speed-dialling a tribal based dictatorship of the 19th century ionto an open westernstyle democracy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chad Handley

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Tue

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jake Wynn

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  11. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael Damron

  13. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  14. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caeon

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  17. 4 out of 5

    The Audio Book Master

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Cornwall

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mjmgopackgogmail.Com

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joe Holman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Pearson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian Sansom

  26. 5 out of 5

    Morrigan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chikere

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joe Holman

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jruck

  31. 5 out of 5

    Traci

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  33. 4 out of 5

    Troy Fisher

  34. 5 out of 5

    Rich Lovering

  35. 5 out of 5

    Carla

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  37. 5 out of 5

    Devin

  38. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Sullivan

  39. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jason Christman

  41. 4 out of 5

    Natalia Hule

  42. 5 out of 5

    Jake

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