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Meet Mike. Mike wants to be a responsible human, but he's buried in student loans and job prospects are bleak in the down economy. What he needs is a well-paying job that provides health care. This is what leads Mike to accepting a job at NEOTAP, a government-run prison. But NEOTAP is unlike any other prison. NEOTAP is a place where the employees are treated no better than Meet Mike. Mike wants to be a responsible human, but he's buried in student loans and job prospects are bleak in the down economy. What he needs is a well-paying job that provides health care. This is what leads Mike to accepting a job at NEOTAP, a government-run prison. But NEOTAP is unlike any other prison. NEOTAP is a place where the employees are treated no better than the prisoners. Where your personal conversations are monitored. Wait, do you feel that? That's not the ever-loving presence of God you feel. It's NEOTAP, watching you right now. Worst of all, employees and prisoners alike are disappearing from NEOTAP. People who show up for work one day might be gone the next, their existence erased from all NEOTAP records. After becoming aware of the string of disappearances, Mike and Monica Whitten, a fellow NEOTAP employee, team up to discover the truth behind NEOTAP. But before Mike and Monica discover the violent uprising on the horizon, they will drink pumpkin spice lattes from Starbucks, they will watch movies on Netflix, they will form a meaningful relationship in hopes of one day achieving the five pillars of a happy life. Repeat after me: Go to work and do your job. Care for your children. Pay your bills. Obey the law. Buy products.


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Meet Mike. Mike wants to be a responsible human, but he's buried in student loans and job prospects are bleak in the down economy. What he needs is a well-paying job that provides health care. This is what leads Mike to accepting a job at NEOTAP, a government-run prison. But NEOTAP is unlike any other prison. NEOTAP is a place where the employees are treated no better than Meet Mike. Mike wants to be a responsible human, but he's buried in student loans and job prospects are bleak in the down economy. What he needs is a well-paying job that provides health care. This is what leads Mike to accepting a job at NEOTAP, a government-run prison. But NEOTAP is unlike any other prison. NEOTAP is a place where the employees are treated no better than the prisoners. Where your personal conversations are monitored. Wait, do you feel that? That's not the ever-loving presence of God you feel. It's NEOTAP, watching you right now. Worst of all, employees and prisoners alike are disappearing from NEOTAP. People who show up for work one day might be gone the next, their existence erased from all NEOTAP records. After becoming aware of the string of disappearances, Mike and Monica Whitten, a fellow NEOTAP employee, team up to discover the truth behind NEOTAP. But before Mike and Monica discover the violent uprising on the horizon, they will drink pumpkin spice lattes from Starbucks, they will watch movies on Netflix, they will form a meaningful relationship in hopes of one day achieving the five pillars of a happy life. Repeat after me: Go to work and do your job. Care for your children. Pay your bills. Obey the law. Buy products.

30 review for Go to work and do your job. Care for your children. Pay your bills. Obey the law. Buy products.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike Kleine

    Probably, Noah Cicero's best work to date. It's WAITING FOR GODOT meets the second season of the television series LOST meets DAVID LYNCH meets BLAIR WITCH PROJECT meets the book 1984 meets IT'S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA meets the movie CUBE meets BRAVE NEW WORLD meets SVU meets ARCHER meets the book ANTHEM meets FIREFLY meets the play NO EXIT by Jean-Paul Sartre meets THE TRIAL by Franz Kafka meets the movie WHITE LIGHTNING meets the book THE POSSESSED meets LOCK UP. It's worth spending your m Probably, Noah Cicero's best work to date. It's WAITING FOR GODOT meets the second season of the television series LOST meets DAVID LYNCH meets BLAIR WITCH PROJECT meets the book 1984 meets IT'S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA meets the movie CUBE meets BRAVE NEW WORLD meets SVU meets ARCHER meets the book ANTHEM meets FIREFLY meets the play NO EXIT by Jean-Paul Sartre meets THE TRIAL by Franz Kafka meets the movie WHITE LIGHTNING meets the book THE POSSESSED meets LOCK UP. It's worth spending your money on, I think.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Maddux

    This is a bedtime story for anarchists, libertarians and other politically unrested people right now in America. Noah Cicero has a remarkable knack for laying bare all the stupid shit we have to put up with in modern America. He really stirred me up with this story. Mike just wants to be treated with a modicum of respect. Health benefits. That's really not too much to ask, although most employers act like you're asking them to squeeze water from a stone. He goes to work for super corrupt private p This is a bedtime story for anarchists, libertarians and other politically unrested people right now in America. Noah Cicero has a remarkable knack for laying bare all the stupid shit we have to put up with in modern America. He really stirred me up with this story. Mike just wants to be treated with a modicum of respect. Health benefits. That's really not too much to ask, although most employers act like you're asking them to squeeze water from a stone. He goes to work for super corrupt private prison NEOTAP. The fact that there are privately owned and run prisons at all in our real, waking lives is proof that America has failed and was built on high minded ideals that, when put into practice, prove to be nothing more than bullshit. I wish those capable of real political action would take this book and use it to pave the way for real change. Noah, thanks for showing what a despotic empire we currently live under. It might not pack as powerful a punch as 1984, but we don't get to choose the messages of our time, and this one will do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael Seidlinger

    There is life, and there is making a living. All too often, the two don't seem to get along. Pillar for pillar, a code of ethics works as well as an empty mantra: Words without meaning, words that stare right back at you from the page.

  4. 4 out of 5

    outis

    Such a dumb, blunt instrument for a disgruntled manifesto. The concept and thoughts driving this novel could have made for an interesting book, but this one wasn't it. It read throughout like a really bad junior high English assignment in its plot, its phrasing and its sophistication. Skip this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Christy

    noah cicero is AN IDIOT

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This is a strange book, and not easy to review. As I began it, I thought it would be a five-star winner. In the middle, I was completely unconvinced at the direction Cicero was taking. At the end, I began to suspect that the book was a many-layered onion of irony: pungent, intractable, angry, and pessimistic, perfectly content to masquerade as something simplistic without actually being so. I also think that most of the five-star and one-star reviews are taking the work more or less at face valu This is a strange book, and not easy to review. As I began it, I thought it would be a five-star winner. In the middle, I was completely unconvinced at the direction Cicero was taking. At the end, I began to suspect that the book was a many-layered onion of irony: pungent, intractable, angry, and pessimistic, perfectly content to masquerade as something simplistic without actually being so. I also think that most of the five-star and one-star reviews are taking the work more or less at face value, as a manifesto or (as advertised) a "political thriller." As either one of those things, it totally fails; as a subversion of them, though, which I contend it is, it works quite a bit better. Yes, a summary makes it sound like a political thriller: Michael Scipio, down-and-out after finishing college, takes a job at sinister, panoptical prison NEOTAP (the acronym is never spelled out). All of the employees are subjected to continuous negativity from their superiors, who intone a simplistic philosophy of crime and punishment that is almost North Korean in it support for conformity and intolerance of dissent. Of course, a few people are in the know, and they publish manifestos of a broadly anarcho-socialist bent. Nothing subtle about either side. Michael and Monica, another NEOTAP employee whom he hesitantly begins to date, are caught between the two sides, disturbed by NEOTAP, and begin to seek the truth (at their own peril, of course). This very slim volume is out of the ordinary for an "alt-lit" book (although Cicero seems to be more loosely related to that group than many others) in that it does have a plot, and while characters do use prescription drugs, the abuse thereof does not constitute 90% of the narrative's events (okay, perhaps I'm being a bit harsh, but still). It is written in an objective, unadorned monotone; you could call it Hemingway-derived, but to me it reads as deliberately un-literary altogether. There is no real attempt at characterization, no use of any of the MFA-inculcated tricks of the trade. Given the choice between showing and telling, Cicero usually just tells, and does so in very few words. By way of example: "Monica and I went to her bedroom to watch Netflix [...] We began to kiss. The kisses were soft and sometimes I would kiss her cheek and sometimes she would kiss my closed eyes" (98-99). Or another: "Monica [...] would say hi to everyone, have small talk about sports, computers, or random life things. Everyone knew that Monica loved ARby's and would eat Arby's at least three times a week. Sometimes people called her Arby's girl" (119). It rarely gets more florid than that, and indeed, much of the novel reads like a story problem from an introductory textbook on political theory or economics. You know, the sort of thing that goes "John is a widget manufacturer in Widgetville, USA. He has a wife and three kids. He has more widgets than he needs, but what he really wants is some groceries ..." It's a very odd, disconcerting kind of style, but calling it "good" or "bad" is beside the point. Cicero just isn't after verbal pyrotechnics or deep, subtle character sketching. It is always, at the very least, readable and interesting, and it works for this narrative. The novel hurtles, in its second half, through a very hasty exposition, indicting the government and its collusion with capitalist fat cats and the law enforcement-industrial complex, and comes to a breathless and sudden end. If we are meant to read it as a straight-up thriller or a manifesto for taking down the WalMarts of the world and returning to a local economy of gift and artisanship, I think you'd have to count it as a failure. The conspiracies we run across are at once too sinister and too obvious; the opposing manifestos do not progress all that far beyond dorm-room libertarianism. There is just not enough rope to draw out a suspenseful plot, either. The good news is, I don't think any of that is really Cicero's goal. He is candid in interviews and other places about his disgust with contemporary America and its wretched economy, so there's no question that a lot of this satire is meant to strike at the heart of the conspicuously-consuming, arriviste, late-capitalist bourgeoisie. This is where the first few chapters of the novel shine. The rest, I think, is exaggerated on purpose, because I think that Cicero is skeptical of all systems of political thought, and uneager to set up a "hero" or "heroine." I don't want to give the ending away, but for me, it certainly casts doubt on all the pretentious grandstanding that various characters indulge in, and presents a bleak ending even more frightening than the relatively stock dystopian descriptions of NEOTAP. The ending is strange, but for me, it saved the book. If you like alt-lit, offbeat political writing (but NOT conventional thrillers!), or just want to support a good indie press and an interesting, low-profile author, give this a whirl.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richard Kelly

    I know as a writer the idea of planning a book seems soul crushing, but sometimes it is very much needed. I want to say upfront that there is a lot to this book. I felt early on that it had potential to be amazing. In the end, I had a lot of complaints, but it is mostly because I felt it underdelivered. It isn’t a bad book though. I think it is still rather entertaining, but it is kind of riddled with issues. First the story. It was an interesting story. Early on it was very intriguing. But, as t I know as a writer the idea of planning a book seems soul crushing, but sometimes it is very much needed. I want to say upfront that there is a lot to this book. I felt early on that it had potential to be amazing. In the end, I had a lot of complaints, but it is mostly because I felt it underdelivered. It isn’t a bad book though. I think it is still rather entertaining, but it is kind of riddled with issues. First the story. It was an interesting story. Early on it was very intriguing. But, as the book went into the second half the story kind of careened out of control and became an over the top story that went in every direction. It started as kind of a post college life exploration and ended up a conspiratorial, religious, political, mystery. The issue isn’t so much the subject matter, but there was no preparation for it. It just switched gears maniacally. The characters. This is probably the weakest part of the book. The characters are very flat and easily interchanged. Each one is separated by a different-ish history. They have different names and likes and concerns, but they are all the same too. They all speak with the same speech patterns and seem to predict what the other will say. It feels like made up conversations in someone’s head as opposed to a give and take like a real conversation. The writing. The quick complaint there are a couple grammatic errors. A word left out of a sentence once or twice. The bigger problem is the lack of personality. The narrator felt very bland and didn’t convey emotions very well. He also tended to list out actions while the storyline paused instead of utilizing actions to move the story. There were choppy sentence structures and huge run on paragraphs. I think the biggest issue was the book felt unplanned. He spent much of the book setting up the plot and once it got going the rising action, climax, and epilogue were severely rushed. It appears the author either got tired of writing and crammed everything at the end or he didn’t know where it was going and it just ended quickly. Either way a bit of planning would have done wonders for this one. It was an ok book, could have been much better. Might be worth a read. It is short and interesting even if it kind of falls apart a little bit in.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Why are you alive? "They had taken her power as a human. They had locked her out of her own power. Her power was there since she was born but the government and the media did everything they could to divert her away from her own power. Her own primitive power of feeling and poetry." (143) Noah clearly and beautifully fictionalizes all my anxieties regarding the modern world. You're not crazy if you don't want it. The tone and character development was reminiscent of Steinbeck's In Dubious Battle. A Why are you alive? "They had taken her power as a human. They had locked her out of her own power. Her power was there since she was born but the government and the media did everything they could to divert her away from her own power. Her own primitive power of feeling and poetry." (143) Noah clearly and beautifully fictionalizes all my anxieties regarding the modern world. You're not crazy if you don't want it. The tone and character development was reminiscent of Steinbeck's In Dubious Battle. Another chilling novel about discontent and revolution. I'm adding this to the hypothetical list of books I want to use in a course that's themed "Literature of the Social Apocalypse: Well, What Can We Do?"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Austin

    reading this reminded me of reading ayn rand's 'anthem' in high school except the political structure more closely resembles reality here and rand's novel was much more optimistic might feel differently about it after re-reading, which i intend to do, probably without updating this review, probably writing a more in-depth reivew somehwere elsewhere this book is scary. don't read it in the middle of the night alone

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Read. Read in public. Only read this in public. Have some meaningful conversations on the cover and title alone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leftjab

    Enjoyable read, if bleak. Cicero is also a poet – the book is written in a terse, absurdist minimalist style that allowed me to breeze through it quite quickly. Reminded me a bit of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest that turns into Fight Club. (At first, I thought of something like Joe Vs. The Volcano or some Charlie Kaufman-esque aspects to this – rather than the heavy hitters Kafka or Beckett. I don’t find the less high-falutin’ reference points to be a knock against Cicero – I’d rather the writ Enjoyable read, if bleak. Cicero is also a poet – the book is written in a terse, absurdist minimalist style that allowed me to breeze through it quite quickly. Reminded me a bit of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest that turns into Fight Club. (At first, I thought of something like Joe Vs. The Volcano or some Charlie Kaufman-esque aspects to this – rather than the heavy hitters Kafka or Beckett. I don’t find the less high-falutin’ reference points to be a knock against Cicero – I’d rather the write work on something enjoyable than tout his education so to speak. Even Orange is the New Black – that portrait of life on both sides of the prison system reminded me of a season or two of that show.) Maybe the best aspect of Go To Work is the bleakest aspect – if the American dream has gone from aspiration to the directives of the title, the paranoid panopticon surveillance state will grow – people aren’t contributing beyond literally watching others. I enjoyed his observations on crime and justice – but man, this is where we are. What is the point? I feel there’s a conservative rebuttal of the novel as little more than privileged whining where the author should just be happy he’s getting a paycheck – what does that paycheck mean, really?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jodie

    Okay, this novel has really got me in a tizzy. I read this novel solely because it was described to me as "an Orwellian experience" and I seem to have learned my lesson. The writing was shabby and hard to follow and the author's attempted use of stream of consciousness writing was lost in the shambled story. I thoroughly enjoyed the first part of the book but it feel as though when the second part came up, the author was rushing to finish and he didn't mind if he left plot holes unfilled. Almost Okay, this novel has really got me in a tizzy. I read this novel solely because it was described to me as "an Orwellian experience" and I seem to have learned my lesson. The writing was shabby and hard to follow and the author's attempted use of stream of consciousness writing was lost in the shambled story. I thoroughly enjoyed the first part of the book but it feel as though when the second part came up, the author was rushing to finish and he didn't mind if he left plot holes unfilled. Almost as soon as the focus shifts from Mike to Monica the tone shifts just enough to cause alarm but not enough to let us know the story is now being told from a different character's perspective. The vocabulary choices become more and more juvenile, ultimately leading up to a climax that is barely that. I feel like the idea behind this novel was very intriquing and I found myself agreeing with the revolution's ideals a lot throughout this novel however, in my opinion, the book would have been much better had the author chosen to nurture his idea more and build a comprehensive and well-flowing plot before releasing his work.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian Alan Ellis

    “I did another body count in the morning. Two more people had disappeared. I didn’t ask anyone where they went. I knew I would not get an answer. I didn’t know what I was doing at NEOTAP. The place seemed terrible to me.” The latest novel by Noah Cicero locks you into the claustrophobic mind-fuck that is NEOTAP, a prison where the employees are just as screwed as the prisoners themselves. Protagonist Mike takes the job for its healthcare benefits, before realizing he has just given away whatever “I did another body count in the morning. Two more people had disappeared. I didn’t ask anyone where they went. I knew I would not get an answer. I didn’t know what I was doing at NEOTAP. The place seemed terrible to me.” The latest novel by Noah Cicero locks you into the claustrophobic mind-fuck that is NEOTAP, a prison where the employees are just as screwed as the prisoners themselves. Protagonist Mike takes the job for its healthcare benefits, before realizing he has just given away whatever freedoms he once had. Shit. The bleak, Orwellian-as-fuck subject matter keeps you glued and guessing until the Natural Born Killers-shit-hits-the-fan-like finale pumps you full of lead and sadness. This is a very ambitious work by a brave young writer willing to evolve his craft, taking readers into strange and unexpected places. Worth the trip.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Austin

    Like a bad dream I'm awkwardly at a loss for words. I am not sure what to say about this piece. I didn't like it, but it does make me think which I do like. It was as if Alex Jones wrote a novel based in the not-too-distant future where his velvet revolution failed, FEMA camps are a reality and violent revolution becomes necessary. I like the satire and condemnation of modern America and conspicuous consumption, but don't really like how it was laid out. From the title, to the story, to the writi Like a bad dream I'm awkwardly at a loss for words. I am not sure what to say about this piece. I didn't like it, but it does make me think which I do like. It was as if Alex Jones wrote a novel based in the not-too-distant future where his velvet revolution failed, FEMA camps are a reality and violent revolution becomes necessary. I like the satire and condemnation of modern America and conspicuous consumption, but don't really like how it was laid out. From the title, to the story, to the writing style it just did not do work for me. I found Noah to be like a bad comedian who has only one thing wrong: His timing, material and delivery.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    Dos citas que resumen el libro: --- our culture is based off self interest not self sacrifice the capitalist system requires self interested people to do things for money if everyone went around doing things for free the whole system would fall apart are you trying to destroy economic system of america --- The Five Pillars of Modern Society: 1. Go to work and do your job. 2. Care for your children. 3. Pay your bills. 4. Obey the law. 5. Buy products

  16. 5 out of 5

    Greg Benham

    Moronic and awful. That's why you should always read the Kindle sample first.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sean Mullins

    I'll start with the one positive element: the novel's core concept is somewhat intriguing, and is what kept me slogging through to the end. Unfortunately, the execution leaves much to be desired. The writing is incredibly wooden, as if it were generated by machine learning, or perhaps by an alien that possesses only a passing understanding of basic human social behavior. Nearly every scene or interaction is a series of short, simple sentences and statements, with no real attempt to paint a convi I'll start with the one positive element: the novel's core concept is somewhat intriguing, and is what kept me slogging through to the end. Unfortunately, the execution leaves much to be desired. The writing is incredibly wooden, as if it were generated by machine learning, or perhaps by an alien that possesses only a passing understanding of basic human social behavior. Nearly every scene or interaction is a series of short, simple sentences and statements, with no real attempt to paint a convincing picture, or place the reader in the scene in any way. It almost feels intentional. The characterization is abysmal. At no point do our heros feel any more compelling than their soulless, bureaucratic antagonists, because their speech and behaviors don't deviate in any discernible way from them. Every display of emotion rings hollow on the page, as if characters are performing their emotions, rather than experiencing them. The structure of the story itself is bizarre - it just sort of…ends, without any real resolution. The only saving grace is that there wasn't really all that much to resolve in the first place, without writing that builds a sense of place, or characters that express convincing needs and desires. TL;DR - Don't waste your time. This novel barely feels human, let alone interesting or exciting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Catney

    i liked this book a lot. i don't know. i'm not good at book reviews, but i think i want to say that this is a beautiful book, or that it moved me, or something like that. fuck yeah.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brent Barnhart

    Part Two went off the rails.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fawzy

    Our generation is becoming self-aware of our slavery. Sam Pink with his short novel "Person" and now Noah Cicero with "Go to Work" are indications of a new generation of talented young writers carrying on the torch from Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates. Western culture is a culture that easily enables mental slavery. Its institutions make it easy for man to enslave itself with "pipe dreams" inspiring him to chase cookie cutter happiness. Good grades will lead to college, career, marriage, big Our generation is becoming self-aware of our slavery. Sam Pink with his short novel "Person" and now Noah Cicero with "Go to Work" are indications of a new generation of talented young writers carrying on the torch from Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates. Western culture is a culture that easily enables mental slavery. Its institutions make it easy for man to enslave itself with "pipe dreams" inspiring him to chase cookie cutter happiness. Good grades will lead to college, career, marriage, big house, kids, suburbia, bbqs...family vacations which are not all inherently evil but the idea that everyone needs to follow the same path in order to find lasting happiness is a falsehood. There are many things that can be blamed on this. The assembly Line turned man into a robot doing the exact same task in endless repetition. Then normal food became fast food. Hour lunch turned into half hour lunch. Highways were built for trucks and urban sprawl was born and you got Office Space by Mike Judge and hundreds of communities that look exactly the same with the same houses, restaurants (Chilli's next to a Friday's next to an Olive Garden) and Office Parks with artificial lakes. Now we sit all day staring into screens doing basically almost the same tasks as Ford Assembly Line workers. Work is never just work. Work is what defines us, specially in America. We are born and pushed into institution after institution until we are dead inside. Your identity goes through many transformations. We are so far from what man used to be, and now we are turning into something else, a creature that is vain, distracted, selfish, a kind of mechanical agent clouded by noise pollution. Noah Cicero's "Go to work," captures the modern workplace as good as the movie Office Space. We follow Michael as he interviews and is hired by a prison called NEOTAP. It's the same story - go to college, get into debt, and then get a job for a company to pay off said debt, get married, buy house, have kids, and get more debt. Eat shitty food, get sick, get into more debt then die. Michael has just acquired his first debt from college so now he must work like an indentured servant to pay it back. Of course he's not getting paid all that good but at least he has Health insurance now. The first few pages of "Go To Work" are so perfect they almost read like Kafka's The Castle. There also echoes of 1984 as you get deeper into the book. As Mike begins his employment with NEOTAP he is taught about The Five Pillars of Modern Society where the novel's excellent title comes from: 1. Go to work and do your job. 2. Care for your children. 3. Pay your bills. 4. Obey the law. 5. Buy products. He is told that "If a person does these five things every day of their life they will be responsible and achieve a high level of efficiency. These are the cornerstones of modern society. If everyone in a modern society does these five things, then modern society will run smoothly." This is what we have always been told. We are worth what we can afford to spend. You are born to consume products. Acquire debt. Get married and have kids in order to get into a 30 year mortgage. Mike is told not to ask questions. Then co-workers and inmates start disappearing and he is repeatedly told not to ask questions. He meets Monica, a co-worker, and falls in love. They try not to ask questions. More people disappear. They start asking questions and things start to get quite serious. Noah Cicero easily goes from The Castle to 1984 then Office Space, followed by a little bit of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo in the shorter, but more confident second part of the novel. The main character Mike is a full dimensional human that most people can relate to. Specially if you're out of college and searching for a job or are already part of the Rat Race. As the novel progresses Noah Cicero turns up the intrigue and suspense which ultimately pays off. His story challenges and destroys the things that most Americans feel they need in order to lead meaningful lives just because that's what their parents told them. Go to Work is an eye opening fast read that will make you think about where you eventually want to be in your own life. Do you want to be the missing? Do you want to be the cubicle worker that ignores their own unhappiness? The revolutionary that risks their life for a better world? The boyfriend/girlfriend of the missing? Do you want to be you without having to compare to what society says you should do? Do you want a job and get paid? Or like the TV on the Radio song, "Red Dress," do you continue to "live a life not worth dying for." This is the novel that will help you take your first step. Buy it. Read it. Cherish it. Then pass it to someone else that needs ponder the important things.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Austin

    I'm awkwardly at a loss for words. I am not sure what to say about this piece. I didn't like it, but it does make me think which I do like. It was as if Alex Jones wrote a novel based in the not-too-distant future where his velvet revolution failed, FEMA camps are a reality and violent revolution becomes necessary. I like the satire and condemnation of modern America and conspicuous consumption, but don't really like how it was laid out. From the title, to the story, to the writing style it just I'm awkwardly at a loss for words. I am not sure what to say about this piece. I didn't like it, but it does make me think which I do like. It was as if Alex Jones wrote a novel based in the not-too-distant future where his velvet revolution failed, FEMA camps are a reality and violent revolution becomes necessary. I like the satire and condemnation of modern America and conspicuous consumption, but don't really like how it was laid out. From the title, to the story, to the writing style it just did not do work for me. I found Noah to be like a bad comedian who has only one thing wrong: His timing, material and delivery.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Off-the-charts level good. As crazy as the things that go on in this novel sound, they are dead in the money the kinds if things that are circulating on the cutting edge of conspiracy. Cicero's tightest work to date. I read it in one sitting because I couldn't put it down. Taken as a kind of conceptual trilogy, Best Behavior, Insurgent, and this novel form a kind of working-through response to the utterly absurd lives we lead in a late capitalist society. Get all three of these novels immediatel Off-the-charts level good. As crazy as the things that go on in this novel sound, they are dead in the money the kinds if things that are circulating on the cutting edge of conspiracy. Cicero's tightest work to date. I read it in one sitting because I couldn't put it down. Taken as a kind of conceptual trilogy, Best Behavior, Insurgent, and this novel form a kind of working-through response to the utterly absurd lives we lead in a late capitalist society. Get all three of these novels immediately.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J K

    This strikingly questions the work-sleep-buy-stuff-repeat that society is based on. The end isn't entirely what you'd expect - a quick read but not necessarily easy. Raises serious questions, then tries to break you with sheer absurdity, in the vein of Kafka as written by Orwell. It winds up in a violent flurry of adrenaline and tears. Besides, however seriously you want to take the message and the frustrations it highlights, the urine test scene and the telling-off afterwards is frickin' hilario This strikingly questions the work-sleep-buy-stuff-repeat that society is based on. The end isn't entirely what you'd expect - a quick read but not necessarily easy. Raises serious questions, then tries to break you with sheer absurdity, in the vein of Kafka as written by Orwell. It winds up in a violent flurry of adrenaline and tears. Besides, however seriously you want to take the message and the frustrations it highlights, the urine test scene and the telling-off afterwards is frickin' hilarious.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Evan Reyes

    Pretty hilarious 'political thriller'. I really liked the way the characters' thoughts and actions made me reflect on my own life and my place in society. It was hilarious when the characters had guns and were fighting people at the end of the novel. Would recommend for anyone who experiences existential terror or pain, even on a small scale, at times in their lives. I like Noah Cicero's prose style because he does not 'bullshit around' and is pretty 'to the point'.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Wegehaupt

    Holy shit everything about this book just worked for me. Best novella I've read in a long time. I don't give a 5-star lightly, but there wasn't a moment in the book that I was not completely into it. Insightful, cutting, righteously angry, critical, full of love and compassion for humans... A lot of powerful criticism of many problems in the US packed into a 150-page political thriller. It costs just a few bucks on Amazon... Go out and read it now!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    A thought-provoking novel about freedom, or rather, our belief that we are free. The premise is that in order to destroy our enemies, we have to become like them, but stronger. The problem is, once the organs of the state have a taste for this way of being, do they want to go back to how things were before? And what chance do we, as individuals, have in the face of so much power? A great read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Gwilliam

    This definitely sits somewhere between 3 & 4 stars for me, but I want to be generous. The whole thing feels a bit like an exercise in indie lit; it's a bit on the nose throughout. All things considered, though, it's better than fine, and not bad at all for something I finished in a single flight. This definitely sits somewhere between 3 & 4 stars for me, but I want to be generous. The whole thing feels a bit like an exercise in indie lit; it's a bit on the nose throughout. All things considered, though, it's better than fine, and not bad at all for something I finished in a single flight.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Oakley

    dude. what's up with books I've been reading lately starting with "mmhmm....wow....interesting....ahuh....good point" and ending with "what the efffing eff is going on?? why are they doing this to me??" my mind. is excited.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    This is by far one of the worst books I have ever read. I totally judged the book by it's cover. I read the back thinking it would be interesting like a modern version of 1984. NOPE! It sucked. Part one progressed slowly. Part two progressed so absurdly that I had to stop reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Tempel

    i get the whiff of a few bad influences in his life. ditch the motherfuckers, cicero.\\\

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