counter create hit Slave Girl - I Was an Ordinary British Girl. I Was Kidnapped and Sold into Sex Slavery. This is My Horrific True Story - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Slave Girl - I Was an Ordinary British Girl. I Was Kidnapped and Sold into Sex Slavery. This is My Horrific True Story

Availability: Ready to download

From the age of three, the very people who were meant to be looking after and protecting Sarah Forsyth were sexually abusing her. Somehow she managed to overcome the hurt and heartbreak of a horrific childhood, and build a new and happy life for herself as a nursery nurse. Then, one day, Sarah spotted a newspaper advert for a job in a creche in Amsterdam. Thrilled by the p From the age of three, the very people who were meant to be looking after and protecting Sarah Forsyth were sexually abusing her. Somehow she managed to overcome the hurt and heartbreak of a horrific childhood, and build a new and happy life for herself as a nursery nurse. Then, one day, Sarah spotted a newspaper advert for a job in a creche in Amsterdam. Thrilled by the prospect of a fresh start away from Newcastle and all the memories it held, she eagerly signed up. But within minutes of arriving in Amsterdam her life began to fall apart. There was no creche and no job: Sarah was a victim of sex-trafficking. Fed cocaine and cannabis, and forced at gunpoint to work as a prostitute in the red light district of Amsterdam, Sarah was turned from a young innocent English girl into a desperate and terrified crack whore. Riddled with fear about what her pimps would do to her if they caught her trying to run away, it took Sarah almost a year to find the strength to fight back and escape. But, unlike many of the girls that she was forced to live and work beside, she did get away. Sarah Forsyth is a survivor. This is her heartbreaking story.


Compare
Ads Banner

From the age of three, the very people who were meant to be looking after and protecting Sarah Forsyth were sexually abusing her. Somehow she managed to overcome the hurt and heartbreak of a horrific childhood, and build a new and happy life for herself as a nursery nurse. Then, one day, Sarah spotted a newspaper advert for a job in a creche in Amsterdam. Thrilled by the p From the age of three, the very people who were meant to be looking after and protecting Sarah Forsyth were sexually abusing her. Somehow she managed to overcome the hurt and heartbreak of a horrific childhood, and build a new and happy life for herself as a nursery nurse. Then, one day, Sarah spotted a newspaper advert for a job in a creche in Amsterdam. Thrilled by the prospect of a fresh start away from Newcastle and all the memories it held, she eagerly signed up. But within minutes of arriving in Amsterdam her life began to fall apart. There was no creche and no job: Sarah was a victim of sex-trafficking. Fed cocaine and cannabis, and forced at gunpoint to work as a prostitute in the red light district of Amsterdam, Sarah was turned from a young innocent English girl into a desperate and terrified crack whore. Riddled with fear about what her pimps would do to her if they caught her trying to run away, it took Sarah almost a year to find the strength to fight back and escape. But, unlike many of the girls that she was forced to live and work beside, she did get away. Sarah Forsyth is a survivor. This is her heartbreaking story.

30 review for Slave Girl - I Was an Ordinary British Girl. I Was Kidnapped and Sold into Sex Slavery. This is My Horrific True Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sibel Hodge

    Last year I wrote Trafficked: The Diary of a Sex Slave to try and raise awareness about trafficking, so after my research for it I was expecting a lot of the horrific ordeal that Sarah describes in her book, but many others will not be. This book is a must-read and is very well-written. You will cry while reading Sarah's heart-breaking story, and you will feel disgusted, sick, and angry, but it's a story that needs to be read. No one should have to go through this. Slave Girl addresses a lot of Last year I wrote Trafficked: The Diary of a Sex Slave to try and raise awareness about trafficking, so after my research for it I was expecting a lot of the horrific ordeal that Sarah describes in her book, but many others will not be. This book is a must-read and is very well-written. You will cry while reading Sarah's heart-breaking story, and you will feel disgusted, sick, and angry, but it's a story that needs to be read. No one should have to go through this. Slave Girl addresses a lot of common misconceptions surrounding prostitution - mainly that these women must’ve got into it by choice. Society doesn’t pay attention to the reason prostitutes are doing what they’re doing. They don’t stop and think how they got into that situation - far better to ignore it than have to deal with the horrendous fact that trafficking is a huge global problem that makes a hell of a lot of money for those involved, from the bottom right up to the very top. That woman working on a street corner or in a sauna or massage parlour that you see every day could be trafficked. In the UK, it is not hidden from view, but blatantly in your face - street corners, massage parlours freely advertising in phone boxes, on the net, in newspapers, and yet very little is done to protect these women from trafficking. Another misconception is that victims can just escape - it’s not as simple as that. As Sarah says “ Not all prisons have bars and walls - some are in the mind.” Victims hardly ever speak out because they're subjected to unimaginable abuse and violence, or their families are threatened. They cannot escape because they are brainwashed into believing their captors and they don't know who to trust. In Sarah’s case, she was further bound to her captors after being fed drugs just to get through her living hell. An addiction she’s still struggling to deal with. Sarah's previous history with abuse may have made her more vulnerable, but it could easily happen to you, or your daughter, or your sister, or your wife. She put her trust in the wrong person. A mistake that was a tragedy for her and could've cost her life. It did cost others mentioned in the book their lives. It proves that a normal person who accidentally slips up could be in the same situation. In fact, it's going on under your nose right now. Together, we can all do something to raise awareness. This is not someone else’s problem - it’s everyone’s problem. I applaud Sarah for having the strength and courage to share her story, and break the common misconceptions that surround trafficking. She is one of the lucky ones who managed to escape, but she is far from healed. Everything that’s happened to her is an ongoing struggle to deal with. I really hope that one day she will heal the invisible psychological wounds.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eva Leger

    I found this whole book to be very unbelievable to be brutally honest. It took me awhile to decide whether to be honest or not but in the end I have to be. Forsyth came across as lying to me. And I wouldn't say that without having very strong feelings. I could always be wrong but I pegged A Million Little Pieces from the first few pages, long before the truth came out, and The Angel at The Fence too. So maybe I have a nose for these things. If anything comes out about this woman in the future I I found this whole book to be very unbelievable to be brutally honest. It took me awhile to decide whether to be honest or not but in the end I have to be. Forsyth came across as lying to me. And I wouldn't say that without having very strong feelings. I could always be wrong but I pegged A Million Little Pieces from the first few pages, long before the truth came out, and The Angel at The Fence too. So maybe I have a nose for these things. If anything comes out about this woman in the future I have a feeling it won't be about the truthfulness of this book and her experiences. I think it will be someone outing her. I'm not sure if Tate was taken in or if he's part of this but I think it's a fraud. "Respectable sources", what exactly is that? My Mom is a respectable source to me but not to everyone else in the world. Why can't the reader know who this "respectable source" is? Then we're expected to believe this about the dogs? This womans abusers always used big ferocious dogs to scare her. When she was at home, in care, when she was kidnapped, in every country, all the time, dogs. I could go on and on and on but I don't really feel like it. It didn't come off as true to me and I would bet actual real money that this is a fake. I think she knew some things, whether she traveled to Amsterdam to research this book or whether she went there to be a sex worker on her own or with a boyfriend, whatever the case, I doubt she was actually tricked. Too many unreal situations and it has nothing to do with (as she says) "people not wanting to believe these things can happen". I read dozens of mis-lit books and memoirs all the time and I'm very knowledgable about what horrors humans cause. I believe all she said is "possible", just not that it happened to her. I'm only giving Slave Girl 2 stars because it's an easy read and parts were actually entertaining.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Wow, this book is like nothing else i have read before, a first person account of being kidnapped, this book genuinly makes you see the seedy city of Amsterdam in a different light, I really think this book should be read to all teenagers at school to show how cruel the world can be and it shows what can happen to young people who travel abroad alone. before i read this book i did want to experiance Amsterdam, but now I would never set foot in such a cruel, false place.

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.J. Rodeo

    This book claims to try to raise awareness about sex trafficking, but I have some doubts about this. First of all, this book cannot be considered a real reliable source. It is supposed to be a first-hand account of a British woman who was a victim of forced prostitution. But from the outset, it is clear that the words are not coming from her. They are a words of a journalist who is using Sarah's story to convey his view. Second, the message is that the sex trafficking and prostitution is merely th This book claims to try to raise awareness about sex trafficking, but I have some doubts about this. First of all, this book cannot be considered a real reliable source. It is supposed to be a first-hand account of a British woman who was a victim of forced prostitution. But from the outset, it is clear that the words are not coming from her. They are a words of a journalist who is using Sarah's story to convey his view. Second, the message is that the sex trafficking and prostitution is merely the fault of governments and crime gangs, and that the women are just mindless victims who had made some innocent mistakes and now have to suffer. This is just ridiculous and I believe that this is an insult to women to suppose that they have no role in their predicament. Few women are so gullible to be deceived so easily. I imagine that most of them are aware that there are some risks, and when they put their fate in the hands of the others, they are somehow a complicit in the crime. Not that they deserve the horrible fate of slavery, but many of them are not as innocent as this book presumes. Third, I really doubt that the people involved in publishing this book merely wanted to convey a message. I can imagine that this book must have been very controversial and that it had sold a lot of copies. Therefore that publishers must have gained a lot of profit. And most of this profit is because of a detailed depiction of the rape and torture of a stupid British girl. I cannot see how this book is different from the snuff films that the book pretends to condemn.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina Rutter

    I have been searching for many years for just this book. I was always curious to read a first person account of someone who has been forced into the sex industry.From other things I have read and documentaries I have watched on this subject this woman's story rings true to me. She is honest about things she doesn't even have to bring to light. From the age of three Sarah Forsyth was sexually abused by her father, around the age of eleven she was removed from her abusive father and placed in a car I have been searching for many years for just this book. I was always curious to read a first person account of someone who has been forced into the sex industry.From other things I have read and documentaries I have watched on this subject this woman's story rings true to me. She is honest about things she doesn't even have to bring to light. From the age of three Sarah Forsyth was sexually abused by her father, around the age of eleven she was removed from her abusive father and placed in a care home only to find the same abuse awaited her there. After surviving her nightmare childhood she follows her dream to care for children and goes to school to become a nursery nurse. Everything was going great for Sarah for the first time in her life until her relationship fell apart and she ended up moving back home to her mother. While dreaming of a fresh start Sarah comes across an add that seems to be to good to be true. The sad thing is it really was to good to be true. If your interested in reading about a real survivor of human trafficking then you wont want to miss this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    OMG. I believe that she was a raam prostituut here in Amsterdam but I also believe she did this out of her own free will, or because she needed drugs. Yes I know there have been women who were abused and forced to sell themselves but Sarah is not one of those. I know a girl who some days hired a room there where she then sold herself to get money for drugs. She still looked very pretty. She was only 20. (alas she also died of an accidental overdose that year) That happened 10 years before this so c OMG. I believe that she was a raam prostituut here in Amsterdam but I also believe she did this out of her own free will, or because she needed drugs. Yes I know there have been women who were abused and forced to sell themselves but Sarah is not one of those. I know a girl who some days hired a room there where she then sold herself to get money for drugs. She still looked very pretty. She was only 20. (alas she also died of an accidental overdose that year) That happened 10 years before this so called story happened but she was not forced into having a pimp and I do not think she earned 100 guilders for 10 minutes. Lol That alone could tell you it was fake. to be continued

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aidan Cross

    Ideally I would love to have been able to give this book five stars and commend the author for having the courage to share such a disturbing story and raise awareness of the all-too-real evils of human trafficking and sex slavery. However, there were numerous points of the story that seemed illogical, self-contradictory or just did not ring true, and after conducting a bit of background research on both Sarah Forsyth and her ghostwriter, journalist Tim Tate, I am inclined to question the truthfu Ideally I would love to have been able to give this book five stars and commend the author for having the courage to share such a disturbing story and raise awareness of the all-too-real evils of human trafficking and sex slavery. However, there were numerous points of the story that seemed illogical, self-contradictory or just did not ring true, and after conducting a bit of background research on both Sarah Forsyth and her ghostwriter, journalist Tim Tate, I am inclined to question the truthfulness of this story and the intentions behind writing it. Several of the numerous discrepancies and oddities in the story are: 1) The nature of Sarah's supposed abduction. She claims 'Sally' met her at Schipol Airport dressed blatantly like a prostitute while still under the pretence of being a nursery nurse, and that John Reece then held her at gunpoint in the car she was driven away in. While the two of them had apparently worked to deceive Sarah into thinking she was going to be working as a nurse, and had pulled off this stunt successfully so far by sounding friendly and professional on their phone calls, would they really have made the truth so blatant as soon as Sarah arrived at the airport, and thus given her a chance to escape - or risk being seen by someone who may have raised the alarm? Wouldn't it have made more sense for Sally to have worn normal clothing for the meeting and at the very least kept up the charade during the car journey before revealing the truth? 2) The nature of Sarah's escape - as well as seeming unlikely that the Yugoslav pimps upon fleeing Amsterdam would have simply left the way open for their girls to escape and expose their crimes, Sarah is very quick to seek out the help of the police, even after explaining through the whole book that the police in Amsterdam were in cahoots with the pimps and thus there was no use in seeking help from them. So why would she be so quick to run into a police station when previous experience would suggest they would just return her straight to the pimps? Would it not have made more sense to have gone to the British Embassy for help? 3) The fact that Sarah's family did not come looking for her, report her missing, nor even become suspicious the whole time she was in Amsterdam. The apparent reason is because Sarah's mother claims Sarah did call her several times after arriving in Amsterdam, and Sarah assumes this was an impostor due to the line being 'noisy'. Surely a mother will know her own daughter's voice no matter how noisy the line is? The Geordie accent is a difficult one to fake, and surely no impostor could have convinced her mother so firmly that she was Sarah without giving at least some clue that something was amiss. Likewise the calls can not have been that frequent, and surely Sarah's mother must have felt uneasy about having no address or phone number to contact her daughter on, or when her daughter spent more than a year abroad without ever offering to pop home for a visit, come home for Christmas etc? It is extremely tough to believe Sarah's family would not have twigged that something was wrong, and lends more credence to the idea that Sarah DID indeed call her mother from Amsterdam despite her claims otherwise, and that she and her mother knew full well what work Sarah was doing there before she went. (A post on the Fleshtrade blog claiming to be from Sarah's ex-boyfriend claims Sarah spoke to him several times on the phone from Amsterdam and that she is a compulsive liar.) 4) The fact that Sarah not only willingly re-establishes touch with her kidnapper Sally, but begins a relationship with her - and to add insult to injury, wilfully co-runs a brothel with her? This is the point where alarm bells really go off - Sarah at this point claims her and Sally always had some form of affection and chemistry between them and now was their chance to explore this, yet there is no indication of this earlier in the story; they bond briefly over the shared hopelessness of their situation but there is no hint of any real affection for one another and Sarah expresses nothing but resentment for her captor early on. It seems far more likely that Sarah is not being truthful of the exact nature of her initial acquaintance with Sally and casts doubt on the claim she was 'kidnapped'. 5) There is a fair degree of blaming others despite blatant self-destructive behaviour, and wallowing in self-pity towards the story's end, that makes Sarah more difficult to sympathize with. It does not ring true how she blames the hospital doctors for getting her addicted to morphine instead of crack and thus lengthening her life as an addict; surely trained and experienced doctors would know better than this? 6) The nature of her relationships with other people constantly seems to change throughout the book depending upon how much pity Sarah wants directed at herself. As well as the aforementioned illogic regarding Sally, there's also Sarah's mother - one minute they're really close and share a loving family bond, the next she's claiming their relationship is awkward and they hardly see each other? And also her wife Tracy - what seems particularly unusual is how Sarah says even her own wife does not believe her about the more horrific and fantastical elements of her story. (She is also immediately condescending about anyone who dares question her story - if she has nothing to hide and it is all truthful, why would she need to be so aggressively defensive about her version of events?) She also admits to being violent with her partner, which does her no favours. (And as many other reviewers have mentioned, it's worth reading up on the case of Sarah spitting at a hospital nurse and potentially infecting her with Hepatitis C as has been reported in the news - she is clearly no angel.) 7) The fact that her description of the Red Light District in Amsterdam is actually highly inaccurate, and anyone who has been there should be able to verify the author has greatly distorted this for sensationalist purposes. I have been to the RLD as a tourist (naturally this book had me feeling ashamed at having done so, and while I question its accuracy I have no intention of going there again) and the girls in the windows appear perfectly healthy, fit, attractive and seemingly happy there. It is quite likely that the latter point is an act they have mastered in order to keep drawing punters in, but even so it is not an act that a hopeless junkie would be physically or mentally capable of pulling off convincingly. In short, there is no way that these women are simply 'living on a diet of drugs and m&ms' as Sarah claims; her description is more akin to the disease-ridden and drug-addicted prostitutes you are more likely to find walking the streets of any big city. Likewise Sarah is extremely demeaning of the punters who visit the girls and even the tourists who pass through the area, she basically says they are all evil and feelingless, knowingly raping the girls. While I do not deny there are many men of this nature who use prostitutes, it appeared to me that most punters and tourists in this particular area are quite ordinary people - either local businessmen, young lads on a stag do or nervous young men looking naively for a decadent thrill - not the kind of people who would in any sense wish any harm on the girls or disrespect their humanity, rather just normal people under the naive impression that there is no criminal element to the RLD and thinking the girls are content in their jobs. I do not deny for a minute that these criminal elements exist and that many of the girls are there against their will, there have been too many stories of this nature to refute it, but the nastier elements of Amsterdam's RLD present themselves in a far more subtle form than this book would have you believe. With these concerns in mind, I conducted some background research online into the case. The episode of The Cook Report that featured Sarah is available to view online and would seem to corroborate the bare bones of her story, also featuring her diary entries that are quoted in the book, but certain sources - namely the aforementioned news article about her spitting at a nurse, as well as the refutations of the story by posters on fleshtrade.blogspot.com claiming to have known Sarah, and the online conduct of co-writer Tim Tate, cast huge doubts on the truthfulness of 90% of the details. While it does appear reasonably likely that John Reece did pimp her out and abuse her, and was convicted of such (though it is extremely curious that there is not one single news story about his conviction online), whether or not he and Sally actually 'kidnapped' her or forced her into the work she did is debatable, while it is quite likely there was more to her and Sally's (there is good evidence online that Sally's real name is Esther) relationship at the start than the book claims, and as for the more horrific and nightmarish elements of the story - namely the Yugoslav pimps Gregor and Pavlov, the dogs (Pavlov's dog anyone?) being fed human flesh, and the murder of the poor Thai girl in a snuff movie - there is no evidence that these things ever happened at all or that the aforementioned pimps even existed. I do not dispute that such things do happen, nor the fact that there are many unfortunate girls who are made to live through this kind of hell. I just see no evidence that Sarah Forsyth is one of them. The online conduct of Tim Tate, himself an investigative journalist and author, is also frequently questionable and unprofessional. Whilst he has previously been successfully sued for distorting truths in a publication ("Children For the Devil", in which his central claims, while not discredited, are based heavily on speculation and not hard evidence), he appears to scour the net looking for negative reviews of his work and posting aggressive personal attacks on anyone who dares voice a negative opinion or question him. Not the approach of a respectable journalist so much as a sensationalist who gladly distorts truths and embellishes details for the sake of causing a stir - which also explains why a lot of Slave Girl reads more like a badly-written Hollywood movie plot than a true-life account. While Sarah Forsyth herself may have a knack for compulsive lies and exaggerations, it seems this - along with whatever genuine suffering she has been through - is being exploited by Tate in an effort to line his own pockets; thus he is effectively pimping her out in his own way for his own financial gain. If I am wrong and Sarah's story is true, and Tate is indeed making a genuine effort to expose and overcome the all-too-real evil of human trafficking and slavery, then I wholeheartedly apologize. But the evidence suggests this particular story needs to be taken with a huge grain of salt, and Tate's unprofessional conduct certainly does no favours for himself, nor for the thousands of genuine victims of sex trafficking or the people who are genuinely working to overcome this cruel trade. In getting to the root of and combating the evils of human trafficking, there is only room for truth, and definitely not outright lies and exaggerations concocted for self-serving purposes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Delia Curtis

    Eye opening. Never thought things like that happened I hope they found and imprisoned the pims. Very eye opening never thought that things like that happened hope they found all the the pond and imprisoned them for a very long time

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise Bell

    Loved this book from start to finish, pulls at the heart strings

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Paterson

    Disturbing read told with no self pity warts and all

  11. 5 out of 5

    Frankie Yates

    * POSSIBLE SPOILERS * I had wanted to read this for a long long time and am giving it 2 stars because it was a very interesting and gripping read, I really struggled to put it down and finished it in 2 days. However, I am not convinced that the events that took place were true and have gone on to do some research. I don't disbelieve the abuse from her father, but the rest I'm unsure of. I won't go into too much detail why I thought so because many other reviewers have the same opinions as myself, * POSSIBLE SPOILERS * I had wanted to read this for a long long time and am giving it 2 stars because it was a very interesting and gripping read, I really struggled to put it down and finished it in 2 days. However, I am not convinced that the events that took place were true and have gone on to do some research. I don't disbelieve the abuse from her father, but the rest I'm unsure of. I won't go into too much detail why I thought so because many other reviewers have the same opinions as myself, but will state a few points below: - Wherever Sarah went, dogs were used as a threat towards her. I found this to be a strange coincidence. - She apparently survived on only drugs and M & M's for the entire time (over a year). - There was a journalist heavily involved in writing this book, which makes me think that the story has probably been heavily exaggerated if it were true anyway. Tate goes around finding bad reviews and comment on on them trying to start an argument. - Sarah says she went on to date Sally for a while and assist her in running a brothel. Do I even need to explain this one?!?! - She also says she escaped from a detention centre, went to the police and explained she didn't want to be there and they were fine with it and sent her somewhere else. That doesn't sound right to me at all. - There was also a 'sequel' written, which makes me think this is more about money and publicity than anything else. - Also there's a guy called Pavlov who has dogs. That just sounds like it was made to be a joke. Pavlov's dogs, really? I do believe she was pimped out by John Reese, but not so sure that he kidnapped her. She may have even gone over to Amsterdam by choice, possibly for research to write this book. I cannot find any information at all on John Reese or his conviction. On fleshtrade.blogspot there are many comments from people who claim to know Sarah personally and someone claiming to be Sally, saying that Sarah is a compulsive liar. There are comments from someone who claims to have been at the care home with her and says she ruined the workers lives by falsely accusing them of abuse, 'Sally' also says that Sarah returned to England with her before running back to Amsterdam on her own to continue prostituting herself. Sarah also intentionally tried to give a nurse hepatitis C by spitting into her mouth (just google it). As much as I wouldn't wish this to happen to anyone, I really hope someone wouldn't go to this extent to lie about such things.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    I bought this book recently at Asda for £1.50. This goes a bit against the grain for me as a purchase. I don’t really enjoy ‘misery (auto)biography’ as a genre but I found some of the questions raised in this publication interesting not to mention harrowing (as needs to be said). Forsyth is, I assume, a pseudonym for the author or protagonist who is aided by Tate as the writer or ghost writer of this account. It charts Forsyth’s difficult life as she is raised in an environment of sexual abuse a I bought this book recently at Asda for £1.50. This goes a bit against the grain for me as a purchase. I don’t really enjoy ‘misery (auto)biography’ as a genre but I found some of the questions raised in this publication interesting not to mention harrowing (as needs to be said). Forsyth is, I assume, a pseudonym for the author or protagonist who is aided by Tate as the writer or ghost writer of this account. It charts Forsyth’s difficult life as she is raised in an environment of sexual abuse at the hands of her own father and then subsequently by a series of ‘care’-home workers. In later years, she studies to be a nursery nurse and accepts a job abroad working in Amsterdam. On arriving at Schiphol airport, she is met by a representative who takes her to her ‘lift’ where she is then forcefully taken at gunpoint to work in the sex industry in Amsterdam. Following so far?? If it seems a lot to take in, this was also my main concern whilst reading the book. I found myself to be ever-questioning the validity of my reading such was/is the dramatic squalor and deprivation of Forsyth’s drug-addicted account of a time where she acted as a ‘slave girl’ to someone else’s profit. This too is questioned by reviews on other book site reviews that I have read. To this point, will I ever really know of the authenticity of this account? Probably not, no. My visions of Amsterdam, however, have changed on account of reading this book as it raises questions about what really goes on in the Red Light District with police sympathising, sex trafficking and the like. Amsterdam and the Dutch authorities clearly want us to believe that the legalisation of paying for sex via prostitution is ok and even quite a jolly affair. Upon reflection, I now personally question this notion thanks to the statistics, facts, figures and clear displays of broken identities as portrayed by Forsyth and Tate. I have given four stars for the review due to the thought provoking nature of this book but ultimately would like more ‘approval’ to the veracity of the account as well as possibly widened / multi-sourced research.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Casey

    Amazing book. So well written and to the point that I continued to turn page after page until 3.30 in the morning,it never misses a beat. One thing I loved about this book was it's shear honesty and no-holds-barred way of intising the reader into the terrifying and sorted reality that Sarah Forsyth faced from childhood until the book was written in her early 30's. Abused from the age of 3 by her father and respective 'child care' home workers, Sarah does an amazing job of not only recapping her t Amazing book. So well written and to the point that I continued to turn page after page until 3.30 in the morning,it never misses a beat. One thing I loved about this book was it's shear honesty and no-holds-barred way of intising the reader into the terrifying and sorted reality that Sarah Forsyth faced from childhood until the book was written in her early 30's. Abused from the age of 3 by her father and respective 'child care' home workers, Sarah does an amazing job of not only recapping her terrible childhood and early adolecent ordeals, but providing the reader unthinkable true statistics, thus drawing us into and making us pay attention to the inhumane treatment that so many children face. I truly cared about her story. Sarah answered an advert for a supposed nursery nurse job over in Amsterdam, thinking she would be starting a great new life. Upon landing at the airport, Sarah ignored the voice inside her that told her to get out - run- get back on the plane. From there we are taken into a fast paced scene by scene recap of Sarah's terrifying ordeal as she was held at gunpoint, forced to hand over her passport and taken to a seedy hotel where she would learn to become a sex worker in the windows of the notorious red-light-district and fed cocaine, hash and rock until she was dependant. It's not a nice read but its written so well and so in depth that I couldn't put it down and would definetly read it again. What was so brilliant I found was the honesty in admitting and owning her mistakes (especially after her escape which just shows the psychological ramifications of an abused childhood and degrgated existence that was lived in fear and loathing as well as the effects of drug dependancy) I wish Sarah the absolute best and applaude her courage and bravery in telling this amazing and horrific story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roxy

    This book was brutal. An extremely brave memoir. It is so disturbing to think of the prevalence of abuse in this world. From the abuse of trust committed by someone who is supposed to love, nurture and protect you unconditionally. To the abuse of power from figures in a place of authority that are supposed to be ensuring your wellbeing. Then the level of dehumanisation she went through at the hands of strangers. I can understand a mans desire for sex with a stranger. I can understand a man payin This book was brutal. An extremely brave memoir. It is so disturbing to think of the prevalence of abuse in this world. From the abuse of trust committed by someone who is supposed to love, nurture and protect you unconditionally. To the abuse of power from figures in a place of authority that are supposed to be ensuring your wellbeing. Then the level of dehumanisation she went through at the hands of strangers. I can understand a mans desire for sex with a stranger. I can understand a man paying for sexual favours. I can’t understand how her first customers would continue even though she was crying, with seemingly no regard for her. The level of barbarity is astounding – the chapter outlining the fate of one of the girls, continuing to make millions for her owner after her death in a snuff film – how can any human have so little concern for another human being? The fact that there is even a market for this type of thing is appalling. That a girl can be nothing more than a commodity to be traded, bought and sold, treated as though they are inanimate is abysmal. If even the people who are meant to put a stop to this type of thing are being bought/paid off and are in on it, what hope does this world have in ever evolving. This book was a gripping and, at times, uncomfortable read that I could not put down.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Midnite

    This book is quite different from any other book I have read..because its so true. This is a heart rending story of Sarah's life, from the earliest age she was abused by the very people who were meant to protect her. Then she sees a wonderful opportunity to follow her dream job and takes the courage to grab her chance to make her life better. How wrong could she have been. From the moment she stepped off the plane she was thrown into a sick seedy world of violence and forced prostitution. You will This book is quite different from any other book I have read..because its so true. This is a heart rending story of Sarah's life, from the earliest age she was abused by the very people who were meant to protect her. Then she sees a wonderful opportunity to follow her dream job and takes the courage to grab her chance to make her life better. How wrong could she have been. From the moment she stepped off the plane she was thrown into a sick seedy world of violence and forced prostitution. You will be shocked...and you need to be, you will cry, you will want to reach out and rescue this innocent girl. Everyone needs to read this book even if it to just show awareness for sex trafficking. So many people have been to Amsterdam and assume like me that the girls in the windows are wanting to be there because they trying to earn money to live; this I can accept but if they are being forced its completely unacceptable and something needs to be done NOW! This book completely opened my eyes and hopefully it will you too, please read this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    There can be no doubt that the story of Sarah Forsyth, as related in the pages of Slave Girl, is moving and that it is one that sheds a great detail of light on the darker side of the sex industry. It must be said that this is not the most comfortable read. Sarah dehumanises the action of servicing punters, avoiding any gratuitous sexual details and referring to it throughout the book as simply 'fucking'. This tone is maintained, helping the reader appreciate the seedy, animalistic world in whic There can be no doubt that the story of Sarah Forsyth, as related in the pages of Slave Girl, is moving and that it is one that sheds a great detail of light on the darker side of the sex industry. It must be said that this is not the most comfortable read. Sarah dehumanises the action of servicing punters, avoiding any gratuitous sexual details and referring to it throughout the book as simply 'fucking'. This tone is maintained, helping the reader appreciate the seedy, animalistic world in which she was imprisoned. Sarah does not come across as the most likeable person and the book is by no means well written but by God, what a brave thing for her to do in writing her story down. I suppose the only other gripe would be her constant need to apparently protect those who she encountered in the sick, criminal fraternity under whose slavery she was forced to work. She does this by changing the names in the book, making it less believable and also begging the question;why does she use her own real name? Nonetheless, while I didn't enjoy reading this, it is a story worth knowing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Court

    WOW! What a book! Would it be wrong to say a 'good read'? It is truely shocking to know that this cruelty happens to children, women - to any human. It is horrific the behaviour of other people, selfishly harming, both mentally and physically, another living person. No compassion for the abusers whether they find the right path eventually or not. I believe Sarah Forsyth's account of events that have taken place in her life, she is a survivor!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    Read in one sitting, couldn't put it down. Not for the faint of heart. Incredibly raw and bluntly honest insight about sex trafficking and the long term effects on the "survivors." Incredibly moving and I can only hope the book has shed light on a dark corner and raised awareness about what is going on all around us each day.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I couldn't put this book down. I had to keep reminding myself that this was a true story and not a work of fiction, it was so horrific. I have been to Amsterdam many tims and have never been to the red light district (unlike many tourits),after reading this I will never set foot in that area.

  20. 4 out of 5

    K.D. McQuain

    There is some dispute over whether or not this is a true story or not. I have no idea if all of the events happened to the author or not but it doesn't affect the readability. This is a believable telling of a story that befalls women all over the world.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A book that almost defies being rated at all, because sometimes such things seem a bit trivial. I couldn't put it down, not due to it being a page-turner but the extent of the writer's misery, laid bare in the book, just made it so horribly compelling. Even the ending was bittersweet and, as far as I can tell, remains so. How do you come back from an experience like that and recover. The answer is that you don't. Not entirely. Not without the softening effects of time, and even then never comple A book that almost defies being rated at all, because sometimes such things seem a bit trivial. I couldn't put it down, not due to it being a page-turner but the extent of the writer's misery, laid bare in the book, just made it so horribly compelling. Even the ending was bittersweet and, as far as I can tell, remains so. How do you come back from an experience like that and recover. The answer is that you don't. Not entirely. Not without the softening effects of time, and even then never completely. Since finishing it, I have read a number of accounts that doubt the truth of the story. Some appear to know - or even claim they are - characters from the book; others just don't think it's true. Seems fair; I don't want to imagine a world in which the things that happened to Sarah could really take place... Except that they do and we know they do. Perhaps it is embellished, but if so little as 50% of it is accurate then isn't that harrowing enough? And in any case, the book was written in collaboration with investigative journalist Tim Tate, who pretty much backs up Sarah's account, and that's good enough for me. What struck me most is that Sarah never comes across as an especially nice person. A victim, sure, and definitely shaped by her victimhood, but she's also difficult and truculent, lacking in virtue as she does nothing but keep herself alive. That made her all the more real to me. I would recommend this to anyone, difficult to read as it is.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    This is an autobiography which is both intense and heart-breaking. Sarah is a broken woman. Abused, first by her father and then in the care home she was placed in to keep her safe. Somehow, she started to turn her life around though, and Sarah trains as a nursery nurse. Her luck doesn’t hold though and at 19 she becomes a victim of human trafficking. Forced – quite literally at gun point – Sarah becomes a sex worker in Amsterdam’s red light district. What follows is a downward spiral into despai This is an autobiography which is both intense and heart-breaking. Sarah is a broken woman. Abused, first by her father and then in the care home she was placed in to keep her safe. Somehow, she started to turn her life around though, and Sarah trains as a nursery nurse. Her luck doesn’t hold though and at 19 she becomes a victim of human trafficking. Forced – quite literally at gun point – Sarah becomes a sex worker in Amsterdam’s red light district. What follows is a downward spiral into despair fuelled by drugs. Slave Girl is Sarah’s story. It’s a harrowing account of her life, the people that failed her and her own self-destructive behaviour. This is not a woman who hides behind being a victim, but instead she faces what happened to her with honestly, openness and with the voice of a survivor. As you can expect Slave Girl is a very difficult read at times but it’s just one girls story set in a world where thousands of girls meet a similar fate. “I am many thangs – some good, some bad. I am weakness and I am strength. I am fear and I am love. I am despair and I am hope. But I am one thing above all else. My name is Sarah Forsyth. I am a survivor.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    This was a heartfelt and moving tale of an incredibly difficult life. Sarah has suffered more throughout her life that most people can ever imagine. I found everything related to be believable and utterly terrible. I only hope that this story can make more people aware that this kind of awful atrocity actually happens in the real world. In real life, right now, other women, men and children, are going through something very similar to what Sarah suffered. And until we stop burying our heads in the This was a heartfelt and moving tale of an incredibly difficult life. Sarah has suffered more throughout her life that most people can ever imagine. I found everything related to be believable and utterly terrible. I only hope that this story can make more people aware that this kind of awful atrocity actually happens in the real world. In real life, right now, other women, men and children, are going through something very similar to what Sarah suffered. And until we stop burying our heads in the sand, nothing is going to change. Sarah was very brave in deciding to make her story public, and I wish her every success in the future. I know nobody who has never suffered as she has can begin to understand the scope of her misery, but I hope she knows that there are, and always will be, people that are rooting for her. All my love, Sarah!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda-jayne Williams

    I felt like this was two separate tales. One in which Sarah suffered sexual abuse during her childhood and the other in which she was trafficked into prostitution. I have read a number of reviews in which readers have questioned as to whether this is a true version of events and I have to agree that part of me has also questioned this, which if all of this was true is a sad reflection on society as it indicates that we would rather question whether something like this could happen- maybe be are I felt like this was two separate tales. One in which Sarah suffered sexual abuse during her childhood and the other in which she was trafficked into prostitution. I have read a number of reviews in which readers have questioned as to whether this is a true version of events and I have to agree that part of me has also questioned this, which if all of this was true is a sad reflection on society as it indicates that we would rather question whether something like this could happen- maybe be are so uncomfortable with any notion it may be true which we should be. I also kept thinking how could one person be so unlucky, to escape child sex abuse to then forced to become a prostitute. One thing it did make me think about is the red light district itself. I don't think anyone really thinks about the true nature of it...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    It was terrible what happened to her While yes, she went thru horrible stuff, BUT there are FAR WORSE THAN what HAPPENED to her like WHAT ABOUT the LITTLE KID'S being trafficked by these SICK ASSHOLES? And THEM getting raped and KILLED? I've heard of WAY WAY WORSE stories then this ONE and she just kept going on about her self and all the older women and NOTHING about the REALLY INNOCENT BABIES BECAUSE she was warned NOT to go there but she was VERY stubborn and went any ways and that was a VERY It was terrible what happened to her While yes, she went thru horrible stuff, BUT there are FAR WORSE THAN what HAPPENED to her like WHAT ABOUT the LITTLE KID'S being trafficked by these SICK ASSHOLES? And THEM getting raped and KILLED? I've heard of WAY WAY WORSE stories then this ONE and she just kept going on about her self and all the older women and NOTHING about the REALLY INNOCENT BABIES BECAUSE she was warned NOT to go there but she was VERY stubborn and went any ways and that was a VERY stood l STUPID thing to do! Even I knew about not to EVER accept a job out of the country back then!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Malika-Liki

    A poignant testimony of a sex slave traffiv victim and survivor. Sarah had it all : chid rape and abuse, foster care and sexual abuse, kidnapping and enslavement in prostitution in Amsterdam. I loved the testimony from the heart of the sexual hell and how she asked herself and the readers about the normality of this new enslavement, of the negation by the "normal persons" the client, the society, of the horror itself of sex trade and prostitution. Sarah Forsyth was lucky to be counted among the A poignant testimony of a sex slave traffiv victim and survivor. Sarah had it all : chid rape and abuse, foster care and sexual abuse, kidnapping and enslavement in prostitution in Amsterdam. I loved the testimony from the heart of the sexual hell and how she asked herself and the readers about the normality of this new enslavement, of the negation by the "normal persons" the client, the society, of the horror itself of sex trade and prostitution. Sarah Forsyth was lucky to be counted among the rare survivors but will have to bare the scars all her life.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    It wasn’t written very well, but what an eye opener into the world of human trafficking. Although I knew sort of about how the girls are acquired, I didn’t know to what great lengths are taken to keep the family unaware their daughters are in trouble. I also was very interested in how the author felt during each part of her horrific ordeal. It felt like she was captive forever when in fact it was only a few months. She is lucky to be alive. I truly hope that she can live a life worth living.

  28. 5 out of 5

    ELINOR OSBORNE

    Scary as this is a true story. This is truly terrifying and cannot believe some people are so evil. Gripping book which I couldn't put down. Such a sad story. Definitely recommend this book to anyone as such an amazing read. Loved.the book and couldn't put it down . I have read the book twice and its still.the best book I have read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wright

    Probably the hardest book I have read due to the content. If you are able to, read this. This book highlights things about Amsterdam I didn't know about. You end up really feeling for anyone having to go through what Sarah or any other sex worker had to go through. It's not always a choice as Sarah explains.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Susan Peacock

    This is a harrowing read... especially given it is a true story. I can't bring myself to say this was a great book as it feels like saying it's a great story but this is not a story, it's real. I have to give it 5 stars as it deserves it. If you like non-fiction then I would recommend this. Well done to Sarah for being brave enough to share her story.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.