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A decade in the research and writing, biographer Frank Brady's Citizen Welles is the first comprehensive life story, definitive for our time, of Orson Welles through to his death in 1985. Welles's influence on several generations of American filmmakers, from Kubrick to Spielberg, for example, is incalculable. Welles's creative achievements, from the best known --- his all- A decade in the research and writing, biographer Frank Brady's Citizen Welles is the first comprehensive life story, definitive for our time, of Orson Welles through to his death in 1985. Welles's influence on several generations of American filmmakers, from Kubrick to Spielberg, for example, is incalculable. Welles's creative achievements, from the best known --- his all-time great movie Citizen Kane and his notorious radio show The War of the Worlds --- to his pioneering presentations in the popular theater of the classics of Shakespeare, Shaw, Ionesco, and his stardom as an actor are at the heart of Brady's biography. But Brady tells, too, the more personal side of Welle's life, such as his amours with Rita Hayworth and Dolores Del Rio and the confounding tragedy of Welles's sad final years, in part, Brady shows, the consequences of tee early success. The young Welles toured with Katherine Cornell; starred on Broadway in Shaw's Heartbreak House, when he made the cover of Time; acted in Hamlet in the Gate Theatre in Dublin. His films such as The Magnificent Ambersons, Othello, and Chimes at Midnight (his Falstaff may well be the greatest of all Falstaffs) were among the best of all time. Brady clarifies the whys and wherefores of Welles's extraordinary success and his end, when Welles was uniformly rejected by Hollywood as a noncommercial iconoclast. The great continuing popular interest in posthumous Orson Welles is vivid evidence of the shortsightedness of that view. ------ “Brady encircles his outsize subject with equal parts of anecdote and scholarship. He does not attempt the intimate tone of Barbara Leaming’s authorized 1983 biography or try for the high-skid fashion of Charles Higham’s Orson Welles: The Rise and Fall of an American Genius (1985). Citizen Welles covers more ground and digs deeper, revealing an artistic nomad whose life had too many ups, downs and lateral movements to be treated as a sales chart.” Time Magazine “Citizen Welles may well be definitive.” The New York Times Book Review “Brady’s quiet but unrelenting passion for his subject pulsates beneath his variegated and vastly human portrait of stage, radio and film genius Orson Welles.” Publishers Weekly “Orson Welles has been called a genius so often it seems like his middle name. But Frank Brady’s Citizen Welles is the first book in the huge Welles bibliography to thoroughly document that claim.” Playboy “An excellent piece of work.” Charlton Heston -------------- Frank Brady is the author of ten books, including five biographies delving into the lives of such fascinating subjects as shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, singer-actress Barbra Streisand, newspaper tycoon Paul Block, chess champion Bobby Fischer, and movie director and actor Orson Welles. All of Dr. Brady’s works have been published by distinguished houses (Scribners, Macmillan, Grosset & Dunlap, Crown, etc.) and all have also been published in paperback, and translated and published in several countries. Some of his books have been optioned for the screen and others have been book club selections. His biography of Bobby Fischer, Endgame, became a New York Times bestseller and has been published in eleven countries. Dr. Brady has also been involved in broadcasting as a behind-the-scenes and on-air personality for both radio and television. A New Yorker by birth, Dr. Brady lives in Manhattan and is a professor of the Communications, Journalism and Media Studies Department of St. John’s University. He studied at Columbia University and New York University, where he was awarded a Ph.D. in communications.


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A decade in the research and writing, biographer Frank Brady's Citizen Welles is the first comprehensive life story, definitive for our time, of Orson Welles through to his death in 1985. Welles's influence on several generations of American filmmakers, from Kubrick to Spielberg, for example, is incalculable. Welles's creative achievements, from the best known --- his all- A decade in the research and writing, biographer Frank Brady's Citizen Welles is the first comprehensive life story, definitive for our time, of Orson Welles through to his death in 1985. Welles's influence on several generations of American filmmakers, from Kubrick to Spielberg, for example, is incalculable. Welles's creative achievements, from the best known --- his all-time great movie Citizen Kane and his notorious radio show The War of the Worlds --- to his pioneering presentations in the popular theater of the classics of Shakespeare, Shaw, Ionesco, and his stardom as an actor are at the heart of Brady's biography. But Brady tells, too, the more personal side of Welle's life, such as his amours with Rita Hayworth and Dolores Del Rio and the confounding tragedy of Welles's sad final years, in part, Brady shows, the consequences of tee early success. The young Welles toured with Katherine Cornell; starred on Broadway in Shaw's Heartbreak House, when he made the cover of Time; acted in Hamlet in the Gate Theatre in Dublin. His films such as The Magnificent Ambersons, Othello, and Chimes at Midnight (his Falstaff may well be the greatest of all Falstaffs) were among the best of all time. Brady clarifies the whys and wherefores of Welles's extraordinary success and his end, when Welles was uniformly rejected by Hollywood as a noncommercial iconoclast. The great continuing popular interest in posthumous Orson Welles is vivid evidence of the shortsightedness of that view. ------ “Brady encircles his outsize subject with equal parts of anecdote and scholarship. He does not attempt the intimate tone of Barbara Leaming’s authorized 1983 biography or try for the high-skid fashion of Charles Higham’s Orson Welles: The Rise and Fall of an American Genius (1985). Citizen Welles covers more ground and digs deeper, revealing an artistic nomad whose life had too many ups, downs and lateral movements to be treated as a sales chart.” Time Magazine “Citizen Welles may well be definitive.” The New York Times Book Review “Brady’s quiet but unrelenting passion for his subject pulsates beneath his variegated and vastly human portrait of stage, radio and film genius Orson Welles.” Publishers Weekly “Orson Welles has been called a genius so often it seems like his middle name. But Frank Brady’s Citizen Welles is the first book in the huge Welles bibliography to thoroughly document that claim.” Playboy “An excellent piece of work.” Charlton Heston -------------- Frank Brady is the author of ten books, including five biographies delving into the lives of such fascinating subjects as shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, singer-actress Barbra Streisand, newspaper tycoon Paul Block, chess champion Bobby Fischer, and movie director and actor Orson Welles. All of Dr. Brady’s works have been published by distinguished houses (Scribners, Macmillan, Grosset & Dunlap, Crown, etc.) and all have also been published in paperback, and translated and published in several countries. Some of his books have been optioned for the screen and others have been book club selections. His biography of Bobby Fischer, Endgame, became a New York Times bestseller and has been published in eleven countries. Dr. Brady has also been involved in broadcasting as a behind-the-scenes and on-air personality for both radio and television. A New Yorker by birth, Dr. Brady lives in Manhattan and is a professor of the Communications, Journalism and Media Studies Department of St. John’s University. He studied at Columbia University and New York University, where he was awarded a Ph.D. in communications.

53 review for Citizen Welles: A Biography of Orson Welles

  1. 4 out of 5

    Suzie

    I can only pray that the copyediting was improved in later editions, because that was the sloppiest work I've ever seen. As to the content... I can see why this biography is popular with a certain kind of Welles fan. Brady acknowledges Welles' faults, but the text sometimes borders on the sycophantic. Countless fawning descriptions of Welles' admittedly remarkable voice litter the discussion of his radio work. Reports of negative reviews are always immediately tempered with direct quotes of whate I can only pray that the copyediting was improved in later editions, because that was the sloppiest work I've ever seen. As to the content... I can see why this biography is popular with a certain kind of Welles fan. Brady acknowledges Welles' faults, but the text sometimes borders on the sycophantic. Countless fawning descriptions of Welles' admittedly remarkable voice litter the discussion of his radio work. Reports of negative reviews are always immediately tempered with direct quotes of whatever positive reviews Brady could scrape together. There is precious little detail about Welles' private life--especially after his career kicks off--which perhaps is a kindness to Welles, given his propensity for cheating on his wives and alienating his allies. (Sadly, it also means we miss reading about his many solid friendships, and while we are told repeatedly about the famous Welles charm, we aren't really given a clear picture of it. Brady tells instead of showing.) Still, his professional life is messy and dramatic enough to hold anyone's attention. Brady may have better served Welles' later years by breaking the biography into two volumes. I shudder to think how frustrating and depressing the second volume would be--Simon Callow will be helping me find out, one of these days--but at least it would have allowed Welles' last twenty years or so to be fleshed out more. Brady's account feels like little more than a list of failures and incomplete masterworks. On a side note, it also annoyed me inordinately that he referred to Micheál MacLiammóir and Hilton Edwards as "friends", an offense of understatement that I believe he later committed against another homosexual couple as well. Distractingly ridiculous.

  2. 5 out of 5

    z

    - prolly the best Welles biography out there: just the facts, very few remarks on Welles' movies (McBride) or on his inner demons (Callow) or his sex life (Leaming) - prolly the best Welles biography out there: just the facts, very few remarks on Welles' movies (McBride) or on his inner demons (Callow) or his sex life (Leaming)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    While it contains some errors and misapprehensions (pointed out succinctly in Rosenbaum's "Discovering Orson Welles," overall the book seems even-handed and shies away from Welles' personal life. I'd have preferred more citing of sources, but overall a satisfying overview of his life and work. While it contains some errors and misapprehensions (pointed out succinctly in Rosenbaum's "Discovering Orson Welles," overall the book seems even-handed and shies away from Welles' personal life. I'd have preferred more citing of sources, but overall a satisfying overview of his life and work.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    One of the best bios I've ever read. The Steven Spielberg/Rosebud/Wife/Welles Play story is heartbreaking and revealing. An under-appreciated man. One of the best bios I've ever read. The Steven Spielberg/Rosebud/Wife/Welles Play story is heartbreaking and revealing. An under-appreciated man.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hodges

    This year is the centenary of Orson Welles, born in 1915 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. To honor this I looked for a good biography of the man, who lived a life that almost seems too incredible to be true. I found the right one with Frank Brady's Citizen Welles, originally published in 1989. It covers the life of Welles from soup to nuts, from his early years as a child prodigy, to his astounding successes as a young man in the theater and then radio, to his making the greatest movie ever to come out of This year is the centenary of Orson Welles, born in 1915 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. To honor this I looked for a good biography of the man, who lived a life that almost seems too incredible to be true. I found the right one with Frank Brady's Citizen Welles, originally published in 1989. It covers the life of Welles from soup to nuts, from his early years as a child prodigy, to his astounding successes as a young man in the theater and then radio, to his making the greatest movie ever to come out of Hollywood, and then the pathos of his later life, when the man was lauded as a genius but no one would give him money to make films. "Orson Welles had a remarkably complex life, filled with contrasts and extremes, and just getting down the bare facts of his various adventures and many careers over a half-century of relentless activity spanning several continents," writes Brady, and he's not kidding. It's interesting to note that Welles only directed 12 films, but almost all of them were classics (some identified as so only years later) but also directed many plays; wrote, directed, and acted in countless radio scripts, as well as acting in many films directed by others. To those in a later generation, he may have been best well-known as a wine pitchman. Welles seems not to have been born so much as emerged fully-formed from the forehead of Zeus. At a very young age he was putting on puppet shows, which led to a fascination with the theater. He attended a boarding school and and learned to love acting. He was orphaned as a teenager (his father was an inventor, who many say was the model for Joseph Cotten's character in The Magnificent Ambersons) and went to Ireland, where he managed to get work with in a Dublin theater company. Then he went to London and had some success there before returning to New York. Welles' life on Broadway in the '30s is enough for a book in itself, and in fact has been made into two films. He and John Houseman partnered for the WPA to mount several landmark productions, including the "Voodoo" Macbeth, the modern-dress Julius Caesar, and Marc Blitzteins' opera, The Cradle Will Rock. Brady's chapter on the latter reads like a thriller, as the theater where the show was to take place was closed by the government. Houseman and Welles found a different theater, and lead a march down the New York streets. In order not to violate union rules, the performers sang from the seats, not the stage, with Blitzstein playing on stage. After reading it I felt like I'd been there. The most lucrative career Welles had was for the radio. He was an immensely popular radio star, trading quips with Charlie McCarthy and producing, writing, and directing adaptations of classic works. The most famous, or infamous, was his 1938 Halloween broadcast of H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, which created a panic among the citizenry. For many years I lived a short walk away from Grovers Mill, the purported landing of the Martians, and there's a water tower still there that someone took a shot at, thinking it was a Martian spacecraft. All along there was a mutual interest between Hollywood and Welles to make films, but it wasn't until William Schaefer and RKO came along that Welles made a three-picture deal. He struggled to find the right property to be his first film. He had always wanted to make Cyrano de Bergerac, for example. He finally hit on the story that was first called American, about a man who becomes successful but loses his innocence. In what would prove to be unusual, it was based on an original screenplay (all of Welles' films after that would be based on published works), co-written by Herman Manckiewicz (there would be, and perhaps still is some controversy about how much Welles actually contributed to the script). But what would cripple the film's success, and Welles' career, was how much Citizen Kane would end up being similar to the life of William Randolph Hearst. Brady devotes two long and thrilling chapters to Kane, and it struck me that if Welles had started his career with anything else, perhaps the non-offensive Cyrano, how things might have been different. Hearst was not an easy man to anger. He controlled many of the newspapers in the country, and not one of them would issue take any advertisements or do any press on Kane, except for vitriolic columnist Hedda Hopper, who strafed the film. Although filmmakers who saw the film realized it was the most amazing thing they had ever seen, and would rewrite the way films were made, it was not a big success with the public. It's interesting to note though that it did receive several Oscar nominations (four for Welles); he won only for screenwriting. The Magnificent Ambersons followed, and what followed would be repeated several times throughout his career--the picture was taken away from him in the editing room. The released film is still great, but Welles was done as a golden boy. A documentary he was making in South America, It's All True, had the plug pulled on it after Schaefer was removed at RKO, and Welles, for the rest of his life, would struggle to find financial backing for his films. Instead he worked for hire, trying to raise money by acting to make his own films. The most famous of these roles was as Harry Lime in Carol Reed's The Third Man, one of the most famous cameos in film history. I find it interesting that Brady glosses over the controversy of whether Welles wrote the "Cuckoo clock" speech--Brady says he did, and that nobody disputes it. Welles says he got it from a German play. What I didn't know is that for years Welles had a hit radio show in England playing the character of Harry Lime. Welles managed to somehow make films--The Stranger, The Lady from Shanghai, Macbeth, and a long gestating film of Othello, that was finally released in 1950 and won the Palm D'or at Cannes. In the '50s he made a film I'd frankly never heard of--Mr. Arkadin, which was again taken away from him and there exist a multitude of versions. I have a copy right now ready to watched from Netflix. He also scored a great triumph with Touch of Evil, which he was able to direct because of the influence of Charlton Heston (despite his gun fetish, Heston did do some noble things). The film was indifferently released, being on the bottom half of a double feature, but again, over the years, people have understood its greatness, both in his direction and his performance as a corrupt sheriff. There are several films that Welles tried to make but never came to fruition, including Don Quixote (which also proved to be a Waterloo for Terry Gilliam), a picture called The Big Brass Ring, which was never made because he couldn't get a big star to play a homosexual character, and something called The Other Side of the Wind. He earned a living appearing on television talk shows and in commercials, known primarily for being fat, a somewhat sad existence for someone with so much talent. To the very end he was trying to raise money for film projects, notably King Lear. Brady is clearly a fan, but the book is not a hagiography. I did find it interesting that while discussing Welles' three marriages and his affair with Delores Del Rio, there is nothing to the rumors about bisexuality. What comes across most is Welles' huge appetite, not only for food but in all the good things in life. His genius is also apparent. When he adapted Shakespeare, he often rewrote him, and incorporated lines from other plays (Julius Caesar contained lines from Coriolanus). One of his projects was called The Five Kings, which took several of Shakespeare's histories and boiled them down into one, very long evening. The play was not a success, and closed early. He also directed a stage musical version of Around the World in 80 Days, which included elephants on stage. Welles was also a charming man, a great storyteller. He had a regular table at Ma Maison where he would have lunches with people he hoped would give him money. A very interesting one of these occasions was when he lunched with Amy Irving, hoping she would appear in a film he was trying to make. She was at the time married to Steven Spielberg, who was riding high after E.T., and joined Irving at the lunch. Spielberg was such a Welles fan that he bought one of the sleds used as Rosebud in Citizen Kane, but Welles said it was a fake. Spielberg probably was aware that Welles might cast Irving to get him to invest, and Spielberg didn't give Welles a penny. Welles even had to pick up the check. The life of Orson Welles comes across as one of the great "might have been" stories of all time, even with him making the film acknowledged by most as the greatest of all time. He was a man whose success was front-loaded in life--Citizen Kane is at the halfway point of Brady's book, even though Welles was only 25 when he made it and would live another 45 years. Not to dump on Spielberg, but I wish he would have said, "How much do you need and you have full creative control." Brady notes the irony of Welles receiving very high honors, especially only the third AFI Life Achievement Award (following John Ford and James Cagney). He was surrounded by dozens of Hollywood greats, singing his praises, but he couldn't get a film financed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    In most autobiographies, the narrator's lie. When the author is known for magic and taking "the mickey out" of the news, reading that author's autobiography becomes an exercise in subtext and irony. Frank Brady published his biography on Orson Welles nine years before Peter Bogdanovich published This Is Orson Welles, co-authored by the man himself. To critique Brady for not getting everything correct about Welles would make about as much sense for critiquing Welles for trying to fake us out on a In most autobiographies, the narrator's lie. When the author is known for magic and taking "the mickey out" of the news, reading that author's autobiography becomes an exercise in subtext and irony. Frank Brady published his biography on Orson Welles nine years before Peter Bogdanovich published This Is Orson Welles, co-authored by the man himself. To critique Brady for not getting everything correct about Welles would make about as much sense for critiquing Welles for trying to fake us out on a couple of points. To appropriate a Welles' tale, we knew the scorpion stung before we gave it a ride.So to be fair to Brady, his biography is a respectable work of research. Brady has a good eye for useful detail. Put together with some of the blind spots Bogdanovich himself acknowledges in the introduction to This Is Orson Welles, the two books help make some sense of one of the most maligned and entertainingly evasive artists of our time.Count my grandparents--whom I love--among those who thought Orson Welles didn't play fair. I heard about "The War of the Worlds" broadcast from them before I ever saw Citizen Kane. Welles was one of many celebrities who wasn't "nice."Brady focuses on more than manners, more than 'Kane.' While Welles the director may have been what mattered most to Welles himself, the topic can't be discussed without an in-depth look at how the sub-topics of radio broadcaster, theatrical director, stage actor, screen actor, magician, pundit and film editor all contributed to the autuer. Brady's research on all of Welles' work supports and goes beyond that of Welles himself. For example, Brady writes about Welles early radio and theater work, "One of the problems Welles had to confront from the very beginning...was caused by his overinvolvement in so many projects and his procrastination" (147). While overinvolved, Welles would imbue his works with a worldview that was present at least as early as his stage production of Julius Caesar in which Welles played Brutus, a good man of principle, "committed to the demands of his conscience but somewhat bewildered" by how to respond to crisis (124). Brady then quotes Welles himself: "[Brutus is] the classical picture of the eternal, impotent, ineffectual, fumbling liberal, the reformer who wants to do something about things but doesn't know how....He's dead right all the time--and dead by the final curtain. He's Shakespeare's favorite hero--the fellow who thinks the times are out of joint, but who's really out of joint with his time." (124) Welles not only describes much of his approach to Shakespeare but to many of his characters: Charlie Kane, Mike Vargas, Jake Hannaford. These are the despicable idealists he would later tell Bogdanovich about. While more than one critic has commented on Citizen Kane' s similarity to Mr. Arkadin, no one has yet linked 'Arkadin' to Welles' radio production of Archibald MacLeish's The Fall of the City. While Brady correctly on the play's "symphonic effect," will revolutionize movies as "sound montage" in Citizen Kane, Brady's block quotes also capture the critique of fascism: The city of masterless men will take a master. There sill be shouting then: Blood after! (108)What is striking in Brady's choice of quotes is how well they support the theory that Welles dramatized post-modern indeterminacy before academics rendered it in their less dramatic opacity. Welles and MacLeish, on the radio risked it when the city's conqueror arrives and lifts the visor of his helmet:There is no one. No one at all. No one. The helmet is hollow. The metal is empty. The armor is empty. I tell you there is no one at all there. (108)It might as well be the cockpit of Arkadin's plane or Thompson's literal definition of Rosebud. The richness of Brady's research makes a web of nearly inexplicable connections far beyond the tired one of Hearst, Hearst, Hearst. As implied by Brady's title, Welles himself is the media giant, too mulit-faceted to be defined; the idealist corrupted. Just when we thought Netflix had advanced studies of Welles with the release of The Other Side of the Wind, they follow up with Mank David Fincher's half-bright biopic, which at best dramatizes Hearst's fake news of Upton Sinclair's and at worst perpetuates the long-discredited Pauline Kael theory that Welles had nothing to do with Citizen Kane's screenplay (irony of irony: Fincher steals Joseph Mankiewicz' propaganda against Sinclair and attributes it to his brother Herman, who is Kael's creator of 'Kane' ... which she labeled a "shallow masterpiece," anyway). Any book or movie about Welles that discusses W.R. Hearst as the sole model for Charles Foster Kane or Marion Davies as the sole model for Susan Alexander Kane is at best third-rate. By mentioning farm machinery heir Harold McCormick and second-wife Ganna Walska, who sang at the Chicago Civic Opera, Brady does some heavy-lifting, that if Citizen Kane is a roman a clef, then the sources were many,--like Kane himself--too diverse to be summed up by something as simple as "a sled" or "W.R. Hearst" (230-263). If Brady's book has a flaw, it is that Welles has been prolific since his death. The Murch re-edit of Touch of Evil, the digital restorations of the sound quality of Chimes at Midnight and release of The Other Side of the Wind continue to prompt reassessments of Welles' work. Citizen Welles is as good a primer for Welles' current Act IV as there is. Act V could include The Deep, The Merchant of Venice, Treasure Island, The Dreamers and perhaps even restorations of The Magnificent Ambersons and The Lady from Shanghai.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard Stueber

    Another biography of the great Orson Welles. Unlike "Young Orson" by Patrick McGilligan which mainly went up to 1940 this one covers his entire life from his birth in Kenosha, Wisconsin up to his last day on which he appeared on the Merv Griffin show. Both are well worth reading for fans of cinema history. Another biography of the great Orson Welles. Unlike "Young Orson" by Patrick McGilligan which mainly went up to 1940 this one covers his entire life from his birth in Kenosha, Wisconsin up to his last day on which he appeared on the Merv Griffin show. Both are well worth reading for fans of cinema history.

  8. 5 out of 5

    sam

    Started reading this but couldn't get more than twenty pages into it. Too full of "child prodigy" bull, slick biographical prose and outlandish, obviously untrue anecdotes. I'll come back and skim it, but it seems thin on facts. Started reading this but couldn't get more than twenty pages into it. Too full of "child prodigy" bull, slick biographical prose and outlandish, obviously untrue anecdotes. I'll come back and skim it, but it seems thin on facts.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Raspanti

    Excellent biography on an American genius.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    A serious, well-documented biography of Welles.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom Bourne

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liam Atchison

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Hollander

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sibley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul Brenzel

  16. 4 out of 5

    Noran Miss Pumkin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Neal Dodson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  19. 4 out of 5

    John P

  20. 5 out of 5

    Willow Garduño

  21. 4 out of 5

    mr j e cook

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 4 out of 5

    David D. Dempsey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kasparius

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Shin

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Mayans

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Losasso

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shay Rapaport

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bob Iannaccone

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  31. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  32. 4 out of 5

    MrE2Me

  33. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  34. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  35. 5 out of 5

    Angel

  36. 4 out of 5

    Seth Miesters

  37. 4 out of 5

    Miraj (Papyrus) Khaled

  38. 4 out of 5

    Judah

  39. 4 out of 5

    CAROLE BORDEN

  40. 5 out of 5

    David Dunlap

  41. 4 out of 5

    Dan Sullivan

  42. 4 out of 5

    David

  43. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  44. 5 out of 5

    Ian Rosales Casocot

  45. 5 out of 5

    Rajit

  46. 5 out of 5

    Coral

  47. 5 out of 5

    aldo zirsov

  48. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  49. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  50. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  51. 5 out of 5

    Richbunnell

  52. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

  53. 5 out of 5

    Katie

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