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Foundlings, book one of The Peleg Chronicles is Historical Fiction "Fantasy" that takes place in the time period of Peleg, soon after the tower of Babel dispersion. In its pages we meet with dragons, giants, false priests, the death hunt, an under-city of the dwarven brotherhood, and many memorable characters. The story begins with Lord McDougal and his faithful shield-bea Foundlings, book one of The Peleg Chronicles is Historical Fiction "Fantasy" that takes place in the time period of Peleg, soon after the tower of Babel dispersion. In its pages we meet with dragons, giants, false priests, the death hunt, an under-city of the dwarven brotherhood, and many memorable characters. The story begins with Lord McDougal and his faithful shield-bearer, Fergus Leatherhead, departing their lands with giants at their backs, while before them lie in wait denizens of the bog-land and forest. Ever ready to protect and serve others, they gather in tow an assortment of displaced adventurers and find themselves embroiled in a mysterious search for the foundlings. Foundlings weaves together the Biblical principles of chivalry, truth, courage, duty, faith and love within the framework of Genesis, and a bold adherence to its historicity. It's an exciting page turner that leaves you wanting more, but more importantly it leaves the reader with Godly heroes to think on and emulate, and a young earth creationist view of history that conforms to the Word of God.


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Foundlings, book one of The Peleg Chronicles is Historical Fiction "Fantasy" that takes place in the time period of Peleg, soon after the tower of Babel dispersion. In its pages we meet with dragons, giants, false priests, the death hunt, an under-city of the dwarven brotherhood, and many memorable characters. The story begins with Lord McDougal and his faithful shield-bea Foundlings, book one of The Peleg Chronicles is Historical Fiction "Fantasy" that takes place in the time period of Peleg, soon after the tower of Babel dispersion. In its pages we meet with dragons, giants, false priests, the death hunt, an under-city of the dwarven brotherhood, and many memorable characters. The story begins with Lord McDougal and his faithful shield-bearer, Fergus Leatherhead, departing their lands with giants at their backs, while before them lie in wait denizens of the bog-land and forest. Ever ready to protect and serve others, they gather in tow an assortment of displaced adventurers and find themselves embroiled in a mysterious search for the foundlings. Foundlings weaves together the Biblical principles of chivalry, truth, courage, duty, faith and love within the framework of Genesis, and a bold adherence to its historicity. It's an exciting page turner that leaves you wanting more, but more importantly it leaves the reader with Godly heroes to think on and emulate, and a young earth creationist view of history that conforms to the Word of God.

30 review for Foundlings

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    Pleasant enough, "Foundlings" is rather bland. The characters are loosely drawn, the world - a promising premise - is hazy, and the plot is rather slow. The author is clearly attempting to imitate the likes of Tolkien or Lewis, but the reader cannot help but *notice* his forced modifiers and belabored attempts to construct a "world." Peleg Chronicles (of which this is book 1) may *remind* you of other, more accomplished authors, but the reader is dependent on their better illustration to fill in Pleasant enough, "Foundlings" is rather bland. The characters are loosely drawn, the world - a promising premise - is hazy, and the plot is rather slow. The author is clearly attempting to imitate the likes of Tolkien or Lewis, but the reader cannot help but *notice* his forced modifiers and belabored attempts to construct a "world." Peleg Chronicles (of which this is book 1) may *remind* you of other, more accomplished authors, but the reader is dependent on their better illustration to fill in the gaps. There are also several choices made that are perplexing. Why brand the book no magic - no evolution - no humanism and the open the first paragraph with a witch over a cauldron casting a spell? Why illustrate a world that has distinct medieval overtones (ala Lewis, Tolkien and many other writers) without showing us the supposed lost brilliance of the post-flood world? There is a clear conflict between pagan polytheists and those who follow "the God of Noah", but no clear connection to either Noah, his descendants, the pre-flood world, Babel or how the message was inherited in now God fearing hearts. Why have believers quote long passages of Scripture not yet written without any explanation for the contemporary audience? Surely, Harding doesn't mean to imply they had the entire Bible (including Psalms and New Testament)? This book is fine to pass the time or satisfy a voracious child reader, but it's entirely forgettable. I was given the set, so I'll continue reading and posting reviews on Goodreads.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frode

    While this book starts a bit slow, the story picks up after the first 40-50 pages and becomes more engaging. The author weaves Scripture in throughout; sometimes it flows nicely, but other times it is a bit contrived. It is a good story, but one will need to read volumes 2 and 3 in order to round it out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Keigher

    I have never read a book where the author included sooooo much scripture!!! I absolutely loved that!!! It fit perfectly with the story line! I guess, the only down side, was it ended pretty much a cliff hanger so you would have to purchase the next book in the series......which I did.......but I really do not like it when authors do that. I recommend it because it is not only great for kids, it works well for adults. It has good characters a good plot and as I mentioned, finally..... finally a Chris I have never read a book where the author included sooooo much scripture!!! I absolutely loved that!!! It fit perfectly with the story line! I guess, the only down side, was it ended pretty much a cliff hanger so you would have to purchase the next book in the series......which I did.......but I really do not like it when authors do that. I recommend it because it is not only great for kids, it works well for adults. It has good characters a good plot and as I mentioned, finally..... finally a Christian author, not afraid to quote scripture. Soooooo many Christian authors seem to be terrified of being accused of actually being a Christian author. This author is not afraid! Still, I was not pleased with the ending. I guess this novel barely squeaks by...almost, as a stand alone....but really......!!! I did by the next, because, I really want to read it with my grandson, but I am not sure if I can afford, the next books in the series :-(

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen B

    I'd give this 2.5, not really a 2, but not really a full 3 either... I love a good fantasy book, especially Christian fantasy. But I couldn't get into this. Something about the pacing of the story really turned me off. It is non-stop action and I found the plot very confusing. It's almost as if we're dropped into the middle of a story that's been going on for awhile. Characters and locations are mentioned with no introduction or explanation and I found it really hard to develop any attachment to I'd give this 2.5, not really a 2, but not really a full 3 either... I love a good fantasy book, especially Christian fantasy. But I couldn't get into this. Something about the pacing of the story really turned me off. It is non-stop action and I found the plot very confusing. It's almost as if we're dropped into the middle of a story that's been going on for awhile. Characters and locations are mentioned with no introduction or explanation and I found it really hard to develop any attachment to what was happening. I imagine this is more a book for kids than adults. I could imagine boys might like it, but it was not for me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jerimy Stoll

    This was different. It is kind of like a giant tract. It is a slow burn and ends in a way that will make one feel compelled to purchase the next book in the series. Many of the main characters are young, and there are some good character building opportunities by the time one reaches the end. Still the story so far is fun. I would recommend this book to young adults, fantasy readers, Christian literature lovers, and Dungeons and Dragons nerds (I am a Dungeons and Dragons nerd, so the last recomm This was different. It is kind of like a giant tract. It is a slow burn and ends in a way that will make one feel compelled to purchase the next book in the series. Many of the main characters are young, and there are some good character building opportunities by the time one reaches the end. Still the story so far is fun. I would recommend this book to young adults, fantasy readers, Christian literature lovers, and Dungeons and Dragons nerds (I am a Dungeons and Dragons nerd, so the last recommended need not take offense).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Marie

    I realize that the lighthearted fantasy style is becoming more popular, but it's just not for me. This book is TOTALLY READABLE for people of all ages and that's awesome! It was perfectly clean (10/10) and very quirky and funny at times. However, I myself prefer more darkness/peril/death in my fantasy. So, I probably won't be returning for a reread of this one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Monique Valcourt

    Couldn't get past the first chapter. It was bland and I read several sentences multiple times because they were so hard to grasp. Characters were already boring me and the heavy God factor just turned me off, any overly religious book turns me off.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Esteban

    A rip-roaring yarn An imaginative rollick through early earth with dungeons and dragons, knights who are bold and have faith in "the God of Noah". Keen to read book 2. I am not entirely convinced that Job pre-dated the patriarchs but this doesn't detract from the story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Agarrado

    Honestly, I found this book to be quite boring and bland. Will still be reading the next two books of this series though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    This is one of those books that makes Christians run away from Christian Fiction like it's going to suck all desire to read another book ever again out of you. Not because it's the worse book I've ever read, because it's not. It had an interesting premise (Which it failed to deliver) and... seriously, my mind is blanking right now. First, it's set in a post flood world. Cool, right? I mean, it's something different (to me at least) and could have been turned into an epic, life giving setting. Ins This is one of those books that makes Christians run away from Christian Fiction like it's going to suck all desire to read another book ever again out of you. Not because it's the worse book I've ever read, because it's not. It had an interesting premise (Which it failed to deliver) and... seriously, my mind is blanking right now. First, it's set in a post flood world. Cool, right? I mean, it's something different (to me at least) and could have been turned into an epic, life giving setting. Instead, it was never developed - at all - and in the end was really just another fantasy world, and a rather flat one anyway. World building is important people! The characters were all a joke. Like, seriously, they were all completely silly. Except maybe one. Now this wouldn't be so bad, except 1. the book was not sold as a comedy, and therefore was rather harsh to just discover, and 2. with the weak world it just sucked all other life from it, because it removed the last shred of seriousness the book might have had. Speaking of things the book was sold as, Non Magic was pretty much at the top of the list (which makes sense, since there was nothing else to sell the book on) and it opens with... a witch over her cauldron talking about a curse? O.o Umm, seriously? First of all, you make a big deal about it never being magical, and then you OPEN it with a WITCH and a CURSE. I won't get into the whole no-magic thing, because I don't mind magic in my novels. But if you believe no-magic, isn't a witch worse? So, if all of this is wrong, there at least has to be a good plot to tie this together, right? Wrong! There is no plot. There's a flimsy sub plot that is pretending to be a plot. It's basically they're all running around trying to find each other... There's no arc to justify it as a series. Which leads to annoying thing number.... 22? Ending the book on a cliffhanger. First of all, there really isn't a climax. There's the story just moving along slowly, and then bang! Something kinda interesting (but not really deserving of the name climax) happens and book ends. This is a book, not a TV show. Give us something worthwhile to want us to get the second book, not twist our arm to do so (though you kinda have to to get us to, so I can't blame you). I don't mind a bit of one, but some resolution please. (I forgot, there was nothing to resolve. Pardon me) And last, but not least, the classic issue of "Let's quote huge chunks of Scripture as conversation". My main issue with this, and I didn't check yet so I might be mistaken, but they were quoting parts of the Bible that weren't written yet. Anyway, I'll read the next, because they already happen to be on my shelf. (A gift. And I kinda stretched the truth and told that person they were fine but with issues. But I digress) But the quality of writing, plot, and story is not worth much to anyone looking for enjoyment. I am probably making it sound much worse than it actually is, as rants have a tendancy to do so, and I could see where some might like it, but alas, tis not much here to like for me. *CHRISTIAN FICTION BONUS ROUND* One unbeliever already saved One unbeliever set up to be saved soon (view spoiler)[Main Evil Bad Guy showing signs of kindness. I see him repentent by book three (hide spoiler)]

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tony Breeden

    Foundlings, book one of Matthew Christian Harding’s Peleg Chronicles is set some time in the post-Flood world in a story that pits the followers of the God of Noah against the Cult of the Dragon. Harding’s writing reminds me of Beowulf, Tolkein or [to a lesser degree] Hickman and Weis’ secular Dragonlance Chronicles. The back cover promises that there will be no magic, no humanism and no evolution in this fantasy adventure and Harding keeps those promises without sacrificing a good story. He pep Foundlings, book one of Matthew Christian Harding’s Peleg Chronicles is set some time in the post-Flood world in a story that pits the followers of the God of Noah against the Cult of the Dragon. Harding’s writing reminds me of Beowulf, Tolkein or [to a lesser degree] Hickman and Weis’ secular Dragonlance Chronicles. The back cover promises that there will be no magic, no humanism and no evolution in this fantasy adventure and Harding keeps those promises without sacrificing a good story. He peppers his character’s speech with allusions to the Book of Job and the Psalms and heroic rhetoric praising the God of Noah and the merits of honor and battle. The allusions to Beowulf are quite on purpose; Harding’s book explores the possibility that Beowulf’s exploits reflect actual historical events in a post-Flood world still plagued by dinosaurs, reptilian sea monsters, and lyftfloga [flying pterosaurs]. The characters face numerous foes, both human and otherwise, relying on God’s strength and provenance. The characters of Foundlings are probably its strongest attribute. The Quixotic Lord McDougal the Friendly, the Just, the Dead; his loyal but emotionally constipated shield-bearer Fergus Leatherhead; the dwarf Gimcrack; the giant Oded the Bear; the intrepid young Ranger Thiery; the brave Susie and her bear Griz; Igi Forkbeard; and all the rest are well-sketched and draw you into the tale very quickly. Readers should keep in mind that Foundlings is something of an introductory adventure in the spirit of The Fellowship of the Ring. In fact, my only complaint is that the story follows two strong protagonists whose storylines intermingle but never quite meet. I would’ve preferred a stronger antagonist as well. Perhaps in the next book… I recommend Foundlings especially for young boys and teen readers with a taste for adventure. I look forward to reading book 2 of the series. You can find out more about the Peleg Chronicles at http://MatthewChristianHarding.com. -Rev Tony Breeden From the Bookwyrm’s Lair Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kendra Ardnek

    For Christmas a few years ago, my Gma and Gpa got me this book. It's by Matthew Christian Harding, and is the first book of a trilogy called "The Peleg Chronicles." Now, if you know your Bible, you would know that Peleg was a man who lived between Noah and Abraham, which gives you a hint on what its time era is. It took me a while to get into it, but mostly because, at first, I found some of it slightly confusing, mostly shifts between chapters and characters, and the book has a slightly peculiar For Christmas a few years ago, my Gma and Gpa got me this book. It's by Matthew Christian Harding, and is the first book of a trilogy called "The Peleg Chronicles." Now, if you know your Bible, you would know that Peleg was a man who lived between Noah and Abraham, which gives you a hint on what its time era is. It took me a while to get into it, but mostly because, at first, I found some of it slightly confusing, mostly shifts between chapters and characters, and the book has a slightly peculiar writing style that takes getting used to, but once I got into it, I devoured it. It's a rather new genre, without a real label, but it's category on Amazon is Christian Fantasy and Sci-fi. It doesn't even really fit with the normal young-earth genre book. There's no magic, and it takes place in the post-tower-of-babel era. There are dwarves, dragons, sea serpents, and pagan priests who want to make human sacrifices of some of the characters, and tons of adventure and excitement. Since it was written by a man, it's not surprising that the cast is mostly male. Of the protagonists, there were only two girls, Suzie and Mercy. There also appear to be three more women in the other two books, Mercy's aunt and cousin, and the Witch Elsa, who is one of the villeins. The one thing I wonder about this book is some of the names, like Mercy and Strongbow, sound rather English and I would have thought that people living in that era and that people group wouldn't be speaking English, but something more like Hebrew, but that aside, I guess an author has a right to name his characters whatever he wishes. The character that I liked best was Thiery, one of the titular foundlings. The first thing I liked was his name. Don't ask why, I just liked it. Thiery, Thiery, Thiery ... It has a nice ring to it. Anyways, in the beginning of the book, he doesn't have any idea who his parents were, but he is an aspiring ranger of sorts and serves under slow-witted man named Oded, whose father was a giant. Oded follows the true faith, as does Thiery. Thiery then adopts the other titular foundling, Suzie, and makes her his sister, which causes some confusion to those who know who Thiery's father is when they assume that she is his real sister. He is very protective of his adopted sister. I also liked that he had a pet wolf. I personally believe that all growing boys need a pet wolf. Well, at least a pet dog.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hemmeke

    The Peleg Chronicles Matthew Christian Harding can tell a gripping tale. This trilogy imagines life on earth after the flood and before Abraham, when real giants and dragons roamed the earth (see Genesis 6:4; Joshua 13:12; Isaiah 27:1; Job 41). He portrays well the antithesis, the intense spiritual and physical battle between the sons of light and the sons of the serpent. There are evil men, followers of the dragon, who persecute followers of Noah’s God. The latter must encourage each other with The Peleg Chronicles Matthew Christian Harding can tell a gripping tale. This trilogy imagines life on earth after the flood and before Abraham, when real giants and dragons roamed the earth (see Genesis 6:4; Joshua 13:12; Isaiah 27:1; Job 41). He portrays well the antithesis, the intense spiritual and physical battle between the sons of light and the sons of the serpent. There are evil men, followers of the dragon, who persecute followers of Noah’s God. The latter must encourage each other with God’s Words and fight together to save the princess and survive. Orphans discover their real identity. Dragon priests seek to kill and destroy, and they hold great sway over the king. Graveyards, live burials and human sacrifice are involved, but no gratuitous gruesomeness is depicted. Intense for very young ones, but generally if you can read at this level you can handle it. I wouldn’t recommend reading out loud to your 3-5 year old, but it’s perfect for 9-12 year old boys. Girls, too, but… well, it isn’t Jane Austen. Excellent pacing, plot and character development. He holds forth forgiveness and redemption by God's mercy, even after heinous sins. Harding is keen to show the power of the Word of God to encourage, and so he liberally suffuses the trilogy with Scripture not actually written until later. A bit strange, but suspension of disbelief (ironically!) goes a long way. This shows well how the godly are to meditate on, find strength in, and have the Word much on our lips in our speech with others. Also, he has a strong polemic against magic. The bad guys use it, try it, and entice the good guys with it, but the sons of light must resist it. This is perfectly appropriate and good in a book reimagining the real world of Genesis 10-11. Though self-published these books deserve more attention from readers. Word to the wise: get all three, because they are one story together, with cliffhangers at the end of the first two. See for yourself, here – www.MatthewChristianHarding.com

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben Russell

    Lord Of The Rings Meets The Bible - that was my first impression as I read through this great book for middle grade readers! This is, first of all, a Christian book! Characters often stir themselves up with scripture from the Bible or hymns that praise God. They run into obvious challenges and violence, but there's no language, no bad situations and the characters are a lot of fun! The story takes place some time after the fall of Babylon, when men were dispersed across the planet. It follows a n Lord Of The Rings Meets The Bible - that was my first impression as I read through this great book for middle grade readers! This is, first of all, a Christian book! Characters often stir themselves up with scripture from the Bible or hymns that praise God. They run into obvious challenges and violence, but there's no language, no bad situations and the characters are a lot of fun! The story takes place some time after the fall of Babylon, when men were dispersed across the planet. It follows a number of interesting characters but all of them are tied together by Lord McDougal, an unlikely hero. McDougal is a lanky, unpolished and sometimes clumsy Lord (that means he's upperclass.) He has recently been cursed by a witch, so he has lost most of his life's possessions. Plus everyone, except McDougal's trusty servant Fergus, have either left him or died. But McDougal keeps trooping along, serving God and his fellow man as he sees fit. Adventure stirs up immediately as our character fights giants, dragons, priests that serve other gods and more! McDougal has the uncanny ability to stir up trouble because he takes his duty (as Lord, judge and servant of God) very seriously. A team of adventurers is built by the end of this book including the dwarf Gimcrack, Igi Forkbeard, and Oded the Bear. You and your kids will still love this story. I have a more in depth review on my blog at http://creationtales.com/blog/155-boo...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lori Twichell

    Touting no magic, evolution or humanism, Harding’s books are a vivid adventure fantasy that will delight readers of all ages. As I was reading, I was transported to this world as surely as I was Narnia or Helm’s Deep. I loved this book. One of my favorite parts of Harding’s writing was the way that he included scripture. It’s always felt like a misstep to me when an author has a character suddenly spouting scripture as if that’s the way we all speak in every day language. But Harding’s character Touting no magic, evolution or humanism, Harding’s books are a vivid adventure fantasy that will delight readers of all ages. As I was reading, I was transported to this world as surely as I was Narnia or Helm’s Deep. I loved this book. One of my favorite parts of Harding’s writing was the way that he included scripture. It’s always felt like a misstep to me when an author has a character suddenly spouting scripture as if that’s the way we all speak in every day language. But Harding’s characters deftly weave wisdom and knowledge from the Word of God into their every day language without it feeling forced or taking the reader out of the story. In fact, the way that he crafts the tale and the dialogue, it gives the reader a strong connection to the characters that helps draw you deeper into the story. It’s nearly impossible to explain how very much I loved this story. The characters were a delight. The plot twisted and turned in ways that caught me off guard, but left me completely entertained. I enjoyed everything about the way that Matthew Christian Harding crafted this story and I can’t wait to finish the rest of the series. I cannot more highly recommend this book to anyone – of any age. Parents, this is a perfect book to read with your children. And if you have a teenager who enjoys fantasy? Perfect! Don’t miss this one. It’s a treasure you’ll be glad you found! Review copy provided by the author. Thank you!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Judah

    A unrealistic waste of paper passing itself off as good writing. A pre-flood world without any magic (except that the evil characters totally have magic), in which one dimensional "characters" shuffle around in something that resembles a Fantasy written by Jack Chick after an all night drinking binge. The main character is a unlikable prick who shuffles around as "the chosen one", meaning he's a pious irritable prick (did I mention he was a prick?) who harasses people about God and quotes huge chu A unrealistic waste of paper passing itself off as good writing. A pre-flood world without any magic (except that the evil characters totally have magic), in which one dimensional "characters" shuffle around in something that resembles a Fantasy written by Jack Chick after an all night drinking binge. The main character is a unlikable prick who shuffles around as "the chosen one", meaning he's a pious irritable prick (did I mention he was a prick?) who harasses people about God and quotes huge chunks of Scripture in an attempt to overload the reader. Seriously, we see at one point a troop of soldiers, our lead runs out and spazzes out at them for being sinners (because as every protestant knows, yelling at people that they're broken is totally going to make them convert), there is appropriately a natural disaster, and the lone survivor is not allowed into our lead's cave until he's willing to talk more about God. ^This. There is just so much wrong about this. Theologically, morally, and literary. And I've not even touched the dinosaurs/dragons (because Young Earthers , you know?) I probably sound really mean, but this sort of thing does damage to the body of Christ. Oh, and it's badly written and it's a trilogy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Hess

    I picked this book up for several reasons, but most importantly because as a Christian author myself I like to read how other Christian authors write so that I can improve upon my own works. The author of Foundlings has created an interesting fantasy world, with the heroes facing danger with the bravery of one who believes in the one true God. It was a bit difficult at first following along as several characters and stories are introduced and woven together, but it is worth it to see how they al I picked this book up for several reasons, but most importantly because as a Christian author myself I like to read how other Christian authors write so that I can improve upon my own works. The author of Foundlings has created an interesting fantasy world, with the heroes facing danger with the bravery of one who believes in the one true God. It was a bit difficult at first following along as several characters and stories are introduced and woven together, but it is worth it to see how they all work together by the end of the first book. The writing style and descriptions of the characters were well developed and godly principles are given throughout the book making it a great read for children. My only criticisms have to do with the context of the book, where several names don't fit the cultural placement of the story and direct quotes from the Bible that would not have been written yet, both of which took me out of the story several times. I don't think either would greatly upset a child reading the stories, but as an adult it did feel strange. Overall, this would be a great read for young fans of fantasy stories.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    This was an excellent book. It surpassed my expectations for a small, Christian book. The author fills the book with Christian imagery. The men quote the Bible on a regular basis, especially the Psalms, even though they not been written yet. But most of all it was a great story, filled with humor, danger, and heroism. The characters are real and the storied kept our attention. We are looking forward to the next two volumes. There were a couple of things I didn't like. There is an appendix that p This was an excellent book. It surpassed my expectations for a small, Christian book. The author fills the book with Christian imagery. The men quote the Bible on a regular basis, especially the Psalms, even though they not been written yet. But most of all it was a great story, filled with humor, danger, and heroism. The characters are real and the storied kept our attention. We are looking forward to the next two volumes. There were a couple of things I didn't like. There is an appendix that presents the Gospel. It felt forced and awkward. Second, the book cover declares that it has no magic, which is true to a point. But it has dragons, dwarves, giants, priests chanting things, witches, curses, dangerous swamps, miraculous escapes, giant animals, etc. So there is not magic like Harry Potter. But the book still contains most of the elements of fantasy that readers of Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings enjoy. In other words, it is not as far away from magic as the authors would like us to believe.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan Larkins

    I really enjoyed this book and wished I'd discovered it sooner. I somehow missed in the reviews I'd read before I started reading that it is a Christian fantasy novel and was rather surprised by the strong message and amount of scripture woven into this story from beginning to end. You can get a real feel for how the author perceives a Christan should live by the way each follower of the God of Noah lives in this book. He has a strong conviction and he's getting his message out in an unusual med I really enjoyed this book and wished I'd discovered it sooner. I somehow missed in the reviews I'd read before I started reading that it is a Christian fantasy novel and was rather surprised by the strong message and amount of scripture woven into this story from beginning to end. You can get a real feel for how the author perceives a Christan should live by the way each follower of the God of Noah lives in this book. He has a strong conviction and he's getting his message out in an unusual media. The characters are fun and the world thrilling. I look forward to the rest of the story in books 2 and 3. I think that even non believers can really enjoy the story as I did, although you may skip over some of the scriptures if you're not interested in the religious message. It's an easy read for an adult and I agree with others that it should appeal to children probably 10 and up as well. It gets 3 instead of 4 stars only because I think the audience it will appeal to is limited.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    This is an exciting adventure with delightful characters. This is the first book of the Peleg Chronicles. It's set at an unspecified date during the biblical days of Peleg -- sometime after Noah's flood, the tower of Babel and the dispersion. The author blends a thriving feudal society complete with knights, counts, and princesses with the dragons (think dinosaurs), giants, and a cave-dwelling group of men called dwarves with the ongoing attempts of darkness to smother the light. It's much like This is an exciting adventure with delightful characters. This is the first book of the Peleg Chronicles. It's set at an unspecified date during the biblical days of Peleg -- sometime after Noah's flood, the tower of Babel and the dispersion. The author blends a thriving feudal society complete with knights, counts, and princesses with the dragons (think dinosaurs), giants, and a cave-dwelling group of men called dwarves with the ongoing attempts of darkness to smother the light. It's much like a biblical fiction meets Tolkien, with no magic, evolution, or humanism thrown into the mix. One warning: Be sure to have the next book available before you finish the first.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alisha Pangborn

    This was a captivating book. Very God centered with endless adventure and even made me think on a deeper personal level on occasion. I did feel like the spirituality took precedence over a realistic plot at times. I think its intended for younger audience (upper middle school?), but a parent needs to know that while the one true God (the God of Noah) is the focus and the ultimate hero, the occult is very alive and real in this book. If you are not ready to talk to your kids about real evil you m This was a captivating book. Very God centered with endless adventure and even made me think on a deeper personal level on occasion. I did feel like the spirituality took precedence over a realistic plot at times. I think its intended for younger audience (upper middle school?), but a parent needs to know that while the one true God (the God of Noah) is the focus and the ultimate hero, the occult is very alive and real in this book. If you are not ready to talk to your kids about real evil you may want to wait on this one.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Peterson

    Oh my gosh!! This book was amazing!! Written very well, and ends with you sitting on the edge of your seat. It is a wonderrful solution to all the books that contain magic and humanism, and are loaded with evolution. It is a breath of fresh air! Love it, love it, love it!! If you are looking for a book that is "different", this is the one!! (And then you'll have to read the second one of course!!)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liza Janell

    overall decent book. strong biblical references throughout the story. i found myself "lost" several times in the plot, asking questions like "what just happened?". i think it was intentional in order to keep reader in suspense and engaged. its a quick read, story moves along at a good pace. good development of characters, some with endearing quirks, and a very likable cast. good choice for older children, teens, and adults. i look forward to reading the next books in series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tina James

    I had high hopes for this book and really wanted to love it, but I and my students were just disappointed. I was rooting for a fun Christian fantasy to inspire reluctant readers, but this didn't satisfy. There are too many puzzle pieces missing in the storyline making it difficult to follow. I found myself wanting pictures and maps so that I could make better sense of the plot.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joel Reed

    I read this book to my wife and children and we all loved it! The kids wanted me to start the next book right after we finished this. We'll definitely be reading the rest of the series. I look forward to more books by this author.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    As I was reading this my thoughts kept being--I can't wait for my kids to read it! Very enjoyable, well written always fantastic to see in a novel how God works in the hearts of men. Looking forward to the rest of the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yaara

    The author's imagination is wasted on evangelicalism. The story could have been exciting and adventurous, instead he opted to turn it into a thinly veiled sermon, making the greatest miracle of all finishing the story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Imaginative I thoroughly enjoyed the images of the post-flood world. But mostly I felt a bond with the author as I embraced his characters in the story. Reading someone's work gives you a glimpse of the writer himself. I like this author.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I did this as a read-a-loud with my children. They never wanted me to stop reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karie

    I quit. The heavy-handed evangelizing is killing this story.

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