counter create hit The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys, 1942 - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys, 1942

Availability: Ready to download

The renowned naval historian chronicles three WWII convoy missions to Russia through dangerous Arctic waters and relentless Luftwaffe attacks. During the Summer of 1942 Britain and America jointly agreed to supply desperately needed arms to Soviet Russia. Determined to stop this potentially decisive operation, the Germans relentlessly hounded the Allied convoys from the sky The renowned naval historian chronicles three WWII convoy missions to Russia through dangerous Arctic waters and relentless Luftwaffe attacks. During the Summer of 1942 Britain and America jointly agreed to supply desperately needed arms to Soviet Russia. Determined to stop this potentially decisive operation, the Germans relentlessly hounded the Allied convoys from the sky. And the Arctic sea battleground could not have been more inhospitable. The British and American merchantmen and their gallant naval escorts suffered grievous losses. The cold was so intense that there were pitifully few survivors from the many vessels sunk in the running battles that raged. In Road to Russia, acclaimed naval historian Bernard Edwards vividly chronicles three of these courageous and harrowing voyages: convoys PQ13 and PQ 17, bound from Iceland to North Russia, and the Westbound convoy QP13. Attacked by aircraft and U-boats, PQ13 and PQ17 lost between them a total of thirty ships while QP13, untouched by the enemy, ran into a British minefield off Iceland with the loss of seven ships. The Road to Russia is an important addition to the bibliography of this bitterly fought campaign.


Compare

The renowned naval historian chronicles three WWII convoy missions to Russia through dangerous Arctic waters and relentless Luftwaffe attacks. During the Summer of 1942 Britain and America jointly agreed to supply desperately needed arms to Soviet Russia. Determined to stop this potentially decisive operation, the Germans relentlessly hounded the Allied convoys from the sky The renowned naval historian chronicles three WWII convoy missions to Russia through dangerous Arctic waters and relentless Luftwaffe attacks. During the Summer of 1942 Britain and America jointly agreed to supply desperately needed arms to Soviet Russia. Determined to stop this potentially decisive operation, the Germans relentlessly hounded the Allied convoys from the sky. And the Arctic sea battleground could not have been more inhospitable. The British and American merchantmen and their gallant naval escorts suffered grievous losses. The cold was so intense that there were pitifully few survivors from the many vessels sunk in the running battles that raged. In Road to Russia, acclaimed naval historian Bernard Edwards vividly chronicles three of these courageous and harrowing voyages: convoys PQ13 and PQ 17, bound from Iceland to North Russia, and the Westbound convoy QP13. Attacked by aircraft and U-boats, PQ13 and PQ17 lost between them a total of thirty ships while QP13, untouched by the enemy, ran into a British minefield off Iceland with the loss of seven ships. The Road to Russia is an important addition to the bibliography of this bitterly fought campaign.

30 review for The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys, 1942

  1. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    A look at the Murmansk convoys which tried to aid the Russians during WWII. Mistakes were made, but there is no denying the bravery and fortitude shown by Allied merchant and naval seamen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Green

    Great book. I liked the fact you really got the detail on the Convoy's battling their way through the German attacks. Staggering to read how little the Russians helped and to find out that the Merchant Sailors pay was stopped when their ships were sunk and that they never received a campaign medal from the Bristish Government (like Bomber Command). Five Star book. Great book. I liked the fact you really got the detail on the Convoy's battling their way through the German attacks. Staggering to read how little the Russians helped and to find out that the Merchant Sailors pay was stopped when their ships were sunk and that they never received a campaign medal from the Bristish Government (like Bomber Command). Five Star book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas White

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  5. 4 out of 5

    tudur

  6. 5 out of 5

    charlie

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katie Costie

  8. 5 out of 5

    denisrawson

  9. 5 out of 5

    m larkin

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jon Vanderstouwe

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debby Cash

  12. 4 out of 5

    George

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peter A Burquest

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert C Queen

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Button Watkins

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Hanoch

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christian Cederberg

  20. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andy Stolworthy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Owen Meagher

  23. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Mercer

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Bonnell

  25. 5 out of 5

    barry reynolds

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charles Bazzard

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mrs Jackie Lewis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Norman Kincaid

  29. 4 out of 5

    Henry Down

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.