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The next best thing to having Mark Bittman in the kitchen with youMark Bittman's highly acclaimed, bestselling book "How to Cook Everything" is an indispensable guide for any modern cook. With "How to Cook Everything The Basics" he reveals how truly easy it is to learn fundamental techniques and recipes. From dicing vegetables and roasting meat, to cooking building-block m The next best thing to having Mark Bittman in the kitchen with youMark Bittman's highly acclaimed, bestselling book "How to Cook Everything" is an indispensable guide for any modern cook. With "How to Cook Everything The Basics" he reveals how truly easy it is to learn fundamental techniques and recipes. From dicing vegetables and roasting meat, to cooking building-block meals that include salads, soups, poultry, meats, fish, sides, and desserts, Bittman explains what every home cook, particularly novices, should know. 1,000 beautiful and instructive photographs throughout the book reveal key preparation details that make every dish inviting and accessible. With clear and straightforward directions, Bittman's practical tips and variation ideas, and visual cues that accompany each of the 185 recipes, cooking with "How to Cook Everything The Basics" is like having Bittman in the kitchen with you. This is the essential teaching cookbook, with 1,000 photos illustrating every technique and recipe; the result is a comprehensive reference that's both visually stunning and utterly practical. Special Basics features scattered throughout simplify broad subjects with sections like "Think of Vegetables in Groups," "How to Cook Any Grain," and "5 Rules for Buying and Storing Seafood." 600 demonstration photos each build on a step from the recipe to teach a core lesson, like "Cracking an Egg," "Using Pasta Water," "Recognizing Doneness," and "Crimping the Pie Shut." Detailed notes appear in blue type near selected images. Here Mark highlights what to look for during a particular step and offers handy advice and other helpful asides. Tips and variations let cooks hone their skills and be creative.


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The next best thing to having Mark Bittman in the kitchen with youMark Bittman's highly acclaimed, bestselling book "How to Cook Everything" is an indispensable guide for any modern cook. With "How to Cook Everything The Basics" he reveals how truly easy it is to learn fundamental techniques and recipes. From dicing vegetables and roasting meat, to cooking building-block m The next best thing to having Mark Bittman in the kitchen with youMark Bittman's highly acclaimed, bestselling book "How to Cook Everything" is an indispensable guide for any modern cook. With "How to Cook Everything The Basics" he reveals how truly easy it is to learn fundamental techniques and recipes. From dicing vegetables and roasting meat, to cooking building-block meals that include salads, soups, poultry, meats, fish, sides, and desserts, Bittman explains what every home cook, particularly novices, should know. 1,000 beautiful and instructive photographs throughout the book reveal key preparation details that make every dish inviting and accessible. With clear and straightforward directions, Bittman's practical tips and variation ideas, and visual cues that accompany each of the 185 recipes, cooking with "How to Cook Everything The Basics" is like having Bittman in the kitchen with you. This is the essential teaching cookbook, with 1,000 photos illustrating every technique and recipe; the result is a comprehensive reference that's both visually stunning and utterly practical. Special Basics features scattered throughout simplify broad subjects with sections like "Think of Vegetables in Groups," "How to Cook Any Grain," and "5 Rules for Buying and Storing Seafood." 600 demonstration photos each build on a step from the recipe to teach a core lesson, like "Cracking an Egg," "Using Pasta Water," "Recognizing Doneness," and "Crimping the Pie Shut." Detailed notes appear in blue type near selected images. Here Mark highlights what to look for during a particular step and offers handy advice and other helpful asides. Tips and variations let cooks hone their skills and be creative.

30 review for How to Cook Everything The Basics: All You Need to Make Great Food--With 1,000 Photos

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Gail

    August: Y'all, I bought a cookbook. I can bake sweets that will make you cry mercy and beg for just one more hit. But actual cooking? Yeah, not so much. November: So I've had this cookbook roughly three months. Am I a 5 star chef yet? Well. No, not exactly. I still have a deep affection for take out pizza. I don't use fresh herbs. I screwed up a dip recipe by making it so spicy literally no one was able to eat it. Sometimes what I make tastes good, but it looks a bit like it was dropped from a grea August: Y'all, I bought a cookbook. I can bake sweets that will make you cry mercy and beg for just one more hit. But actual cooking? Yeah, not so much. November: So I've had this cookbook roughly three months. Am I a 5 star chef yet? Well. No, not exactly. I still have a deep affection for take out pizza. I don't use fresh herbs. I screwed up a dip recipe by making it so spicy literally no one was able to eat it. Sometimes what I make tastes good, but it looks a bit like it was dropped from a great height. And I still haven't made a pancake that doesn't have the consistency of a flip flop. Gordon Ramsey would be ashamed. HOWEVER. I'm not a total lost cause. I haven't lost any digits, haven't cut myself at all actually! Which I feel is impressive for someone who once cut her face on a peephole. I feel decently capable of making my own meal, even if the meal isn't 100% perfect or made entirely from scratch. If you ask me if I want to go out for Mexican food, the answer is always yes, but making my own meals more often has been noticeably better for my budget and my waistline. (Just hit the 25 lb mark! Woo!) Plus, I liked how detailed How to Cook Everything was, without talking down to you. Bittman explains basic techniques and tips really well. Want to know how to boil water, hold a knife properly, or what al dente means? Bittman has you covered. I'm far from being an expert, but now I don't feel like I'm throwing potatoes at sharp objects until something comes out edible. Not everything was a success, and y'all know I haven't tried every recipe in this book. But currently my favorite by far is the Panzanella Caprese (p 126). (Fancy shit for tomatoes, bread and cheese in a bowl. But say you make something for dinner using big Italian words and people automatically assume you are talented.) I usually skip the soaking the bread stage cause I like the extra crunch and I use dried basil cause I'm lazy. But it's delicious, I make it once or twice a week now! I'm still pretty far from being any sort of expert cook. I wouldn't last a hot second on [insert basically any cooking show under the sun here]. But I can say that How to Cook Everything has delivered - I can kinda sorta cook! Or I can cook good enough for me, and that's all that really matters anyway. And I continue to make the best pecan pies in the south.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    Ordinarily the reader should exercise a great degree of scepticism when faced with a book that describes itself with superlatives. How to cook everything? All you need? Yet, this time, such caution might be a tad unnecessary. This is a book that could be one of those truly great first cookbooks for a younger person, perhaps someone off to college or someone moving out from the hotel of mother and father. Yet probably nobody except top chefs should feel a embarrassed by this book as you might thin Ordinarily the reader should exercise a great degree of scepticism when faced with a book that describes itself with superlatives. How to cook everything? All you need? Yet, this time, such caution might be a tad unnecessary. This is a book that could be one of those truly great first cookbooks for a younger person, perhaps someone off to college or someone moving out from the hotel of mother and father. Yet probably nobody except top chefs should feel a embarrassed by this book as you might think you know everything but… Nothing is taken for granted. The author starts with a great overview about setting up your pantry (store cupboard) and your kitchen with the necessary (rather than “desirable” or “faddy”) tools. It was pleasing to see the tool list split between the “absolute minimum” and “other handy tools” – a good thing if you are on a tight budget. A further extensive list of items for baking and roasting is made for those who want to try their hand at that – if you don’t, don’t buy the stuff. Simple, huh? Everything is taken one step at a time whilst the text is informative and concise in nature. The reader is not patronised – you have to read the text carefully to get the most out of the book rather than just look at the pretty pictures, but is that such a hard thing to do? Even, ‘speaking’ as a more experienced cook, the text seems to be friendly, approachable and informative and certainly some ageing memory cells have become refreshed in the process. It is surprising how much we can forget, take for granted or perhaps never learned – especially if one has not received formal culinary training. All of the various preparation and cooking techniques are explained in surprisingly few words and pictures, yet one does not feel cheated. You might think that terms such as mincing, slicing, boiling and sautéing are familiar, after all they appear as common words in recipes, but often they might not be as familiar as you think. Many of us think we know every term but sometimes there can be a subtle meaning we’ve never learned. With this book there’s no misunderstanding. Not entirely sure what sautéing is? No problem. A few seconds research and your mind is refreshed. There is no need to feel ashamed – and if you have poor self-confidence and don’t live alone then you can make a protective book cover out of brown paper and write on it “very advanced cooking recipes” or something similar! The book is quite light on self-reinforcement that “you can do it!”. This is not a bad thing as such faux encouragement can begin to grate after a time. The author set “in a nutshell” five key points which this reviewer feels encapsulate things perfectly: Anything you cook at home will be good, read the recipe before starting, it is okay to serve dishes warm or at room temp, trust your senses and be safe – but not insane – about cleanliness. After the first few sessions ‘back at school’ you start to be let loose on cooking breakfast, the most important meal of the day it is said. Here you find the recipes begin to be mingled between words of advice and various mini tutorials. All the way through the book are brilliant, everyday colour photographs that just seem to grab the text and encourage you to read, read and read. It is not “visual pornography” in an aspirational way but just good, honest, clean in-your-face imagery. Don’t understand? You need to get this book and see for yourself. The real basic, staple foods are covered in great detail. Nothing is left to chance. For example making scrambled eggs has two full pages with lots of hints, tips and photographs (fried eggs also get two pages). The book goes beyond the do this and that, so loved by many other cookery books, and actually tells you why a particular methodology is important. This is great to see as there is a much greater likelihood that you will recall this in the future (and possibly have use for the same knowledge when making other recipes). Naturally, each recipe is easy to read and understand, has all the key information you should require and it even has an estimation of the time taken to make the dish. A book that understands how great and helpful such a small thing can be! The recipes and knowledge just keep on flowing. After the breakfast chapter, everything else is filed within appetisers & snacks, salads, soups & stews, pasta & grains, vegetables & beans, meat, poultry, seafood, breads & desserts. There is even a mini tutorial about how to make your own menus, a separate broken out list of lessons within the book, such as “preparing seafood, trimming whole fish” and a very comprehensive index. This is more than JUST a good recipe book. This is more than JUST another teach your self to cook book. As a combined unit it is a very comprehensive, great basic primer for the beginner, the adventurous cook and, dare we say it, even for the person who thinks they know everything but might just admit that they could always see ‘how someone else does things….’ Would it be hyperbole to say that this could be THE first book you should buy if you don’t have any other resources? Possibly… go to a bookstore, pick it up, look at it and see if you really do put it back. Can you? How to Cook Everything – The Basics: All You Need to Make Great Food, written by Mark Bittman and published by Wiley. ISBN 9780470528068, 496 pages. Typical price: GBP13. YYYYY. // This review appeared in YUM.fi and is reproduced here in full with permission of YUM.fi. YUM.fi celebrates the worldwide diversity of food and drink, as presented through the humble book. Whether you call it a cookery book, cook book, recipe book or something else (in the language of your choice) YUM will provide you with news and reviews of the latest books on the marketplace. //

  3. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    I love this book! I was searching for a cookbook for a friend who was lamenting that she wants to learn to cook but felt uncertain of even the basics, so when I saw this at the library, I snapped it up to see if it lived up to its title. Indeed, it does! I consider myself a moderately experienced, self-taught cook, and what I loved about this book was that it didn't take anything for granted. For example, not sure what the difference is between a "rolling boil" and a "gentle boil?" No worries, Bi I love this book! I was searching for a cookbook for a friend who was lamenting that she wants to learn to cook but felt uncertain of even the basics, so when I saw this at the library, I snapped it up to see if it lived up to its title. Indeed, it does! I consider myself a moderately experienced, self-taught cook, and what I loved about this book was that it didn't take anything for granted. For example, not sure what the difference is between a "rolling boil" and a "gentle boil?" No worries, Bittman explains it to the reader and also provides photographs showing the difference. Confused about the difference between "minced" and "chopped?" Again, Bittman explains and illustrates the two techniques. After going over the basic and more advanced tools a cook should arm herself/himself with, and reviewing important cooking terms, Bittman then delves deeper into specifics about everything ranging from vegetables to poultry to bread making. For example, in the breakfast section, he explains about eggs - from how to tell if one is fresh to how to poach one. In fact, following his instructions, I was finally able to make an omelet that didn't dry out or fall apart when I folded it (for some reason, eggs are my nemesis - I can create an intricate dessert or a tasty soup from scratch, but hard boiled eggs never turn out right - grr!). So whether you're an experienced cook or just starting out, consider adding this great reference book to your cookbook shelf.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andria

    This is my go-to cookbook for basically everything. I had to teach myself to cook and after a lot of trial and error this was the one that met all my needs. Most cookbooks, even beginner cookbooks, assume the reader has knowledge of certain things like knife handling, differences between cuts of meat, the difference between braising and broiling, etc. none of which I knew. This book has it all. Most helpful are the pictures that accompany every recipe. As a beginning cook, I really needed the vi This is my go-to cookbook for basically everything. I had to teach myself to cook and after a lot of trial and error this was the one that met all my needs. Most cookbooks, even beginner cookbooks, assume the reader has knowledge of certain things like knife handling, differences between cuts of meat, the difference between braising and broiling, etc. none of which I knew. This book has it all. Most helpful are the pictures that accompany every recipe. As a beginning cook, I really needed the visual reference to check on things like doneness and consistency and in many cases Bittman will show not only the ideal but a spectrum (i.e. too rare, too well done). I haven't made every recipe in this book and not all of them are winners, but even the ones I wouldn't make again have valuable notes and taught me skills I learned to apply to future work in the kitchen. Great book, would recommend it to anyone, but especially beginners.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I love this book! We got it from the library and liked it so much we had to get our own. Get this: It even inspires me to cook!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This book has given me a couple of easy recipes to add to my repertoire. I also like that it provides basic menus for the average cook. Only downside — it’s a whopper!!! The sheer size of the book might intimidate any novice. 🙋🏽‍♀️

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Cookbook club title. A great resource for new cooks; much more accessible than the Joy of Cooking. A few techniques I want to try.

  8. 5 out of 5

    M Barnes

    They said I was crazy...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Campbell

    Whether you are a kitchen novice, or a seasoned chef in need of a restart, you will be delighted by Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything-The Basics: All You Need to Make Great Food"! Both enlightening and elegant in its simplicity, this book does not overwhelm with too much "stuff". Instead, it lets the innate natural goodness of food ingredients combine with useful, useable utensils and soothingly successful cooking techniques. The results: brand new basics that are a blend of the familiar an Whether you are a kitchen novice, or a seasoned chef in need of a restart, you will be delighted by Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything-The Basics: All You Need to Make Great Food"! Both enlightening and elegant in its simplicity, this book does not overwhelm with too much "stuff". Instead, it lets the innate natural goodness of food ingredients combine with useful, useable utensils and soothingly successful cooking techniques. The results: brand new basics that are a blend of the familiar and the newly discovered. The photography is "at your table fresh"--offering a clear look at ingredients, preparation techniques, and the finished product. Mark Bittman's goal is to state the case for the many essential and appealing benefits of home cooking. He wants to make you want to be a cook. This fabulous resource for foodies offers no intimidation--just encouragement and enticement. My favorite book sections--other than the irresistible recipes--were "Building Flavor" and "Techniques". Both of these sections highlight the benefits of making the most of the ingredients that you are using without overcomplicating the food. Speaking of food: "Quick Pickle Spears"; "Sweet Potato Fritters"; "Warm Spinach Salad with Bacon"; "Risotto with Butter and Parmesan"; "Skillet Pork Chops with Apples"; "Panfried Trout with Tartar Sauce"; "Blueberry Cobbler"; and "Coconut Layer Cake" are just a sampling of the overall user-friendly, yet sensational, recipes found in this wonderful cookbook. Do something good for yourself: cook your own food and enjoy the process. It's that simple. Highly recommended for foodies and cookbook addicts. Review Copy Gratis Wiley Books

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jessie Qi

    By far the best cookbook I have ever read. The pictures are pleasing to the eyes. The instructions are simple and easy to follow. Background information are concise, things I always wanted to know but don't want to read about it in depth. Meal planning with this book is a breeze! Only complain is I wish it comes with multiple measurements for different serving size.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Penny Ramirez

    This would make a great wedding shower gift for a beginning cook.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Great intro book that would be a wonderful gift for one newly living on their own or getting married.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    You'll probably notice that I don't review many cookbooks. Well, the simple reason is that I'm rather hopeless in the kitchen! I have chronic health issues that make it hard for me to do simple tasks. I also seem to have a knack for burning things, and cutting fingers instead of vegetables. So I wanted a cookbook that started at the beginning. This does do that, yes, but it almost goes into overkill with detail. I'm not ready to revamp my pantry, spice cabinet, or supply of pots and pans or gad You'll probably notice that I don't review many cookbooks. Well, the simple reason is that I'm rather hopeless in the kitchen! I have chronic health issues that make it hard for me to do simple tasks. I also seem to have a knack for burning things, and cutting fingers instead of vegetables. So I wanted a cookbook that started at the beginning. This does do that, yes, but it almost goes into overkill with detail. I'm not ready to revamp my pantry, spice cabinet, or supply of pots and pans or gadgets. While the author really doesn't seem to expect a huge overhaul, it seemed a little overwhelming to me. Again, this is probably more my problem than it is any lack on the park of the author! I originally was going to start at the beginning -- with breakfast items -- and work my way through as I could. Instead, I realized that I can already handle some of these things (frying, scrambling, or hard boiling an egg, for instance), and that some of the others are just things I wouldn't want to go to the added work of preparing. I tend to rely on prepared foods simply because I have to pick and choose where my small amount of physical and mental energy goes each day. I think the book is a good, solid introduction to basic recipes for all sorts of foods. I just don't need to prepare my own salsa, or bake my own bread, at this point in my life. I am glad I borrowed it from the library, though, and had a good perusal of it. Cookbooks just aren't really my cup of tea.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tibor

    I am by no means a notable chef. In fact, I've mostly kept it to meal-prepping on Sundays and this is actually the first book I've read on cooking. Me, being an aspiring hobby cook, wanted to keep it simple. I don't need a ton of new and strange recipes, but rather straightforward explanations to learn the basics and fundamental techniques. The book not only tells you what to do but also what to look for when cooking. Is the meat already done? When is pasta al dente? How can you make different v I am by no means a notable chef. In fact, I've mostly kept it to meal-prepping on Sundays and this is actually the first book I've read on cooking. Me, being an aspiring hobby cook, wanted to keep it simple. I don't need a ton of new and strange recipes, but rather straightforward explanations to learn the basics and fundamental techniques. The book not only tells you what to do but also what to look for when cooking. Is the meat already done? When is pasta al dente? How can you make different vegetables tasty? Great for any beginners!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I was looking for basic recipes so I got this book out from the Library. I enjoy cooking, but prefer not to use complicated recipes as I am often a last minute cook. This book provides fairly simple recipes, there are a few "chill for an hour" recipes. There are suggestions for prep and variations for cooking or changing the recipes. I flagged and copied many recipes to use in the future.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Comprehensive cookbook that gave some great advice. My only problem - and it is my problem - is that I should not have purchased the Kindle version. When will I learn that I do not like ebook editions of cookbooks? Too difficult to just flip through and I really don't want my Kindle in the kitchen while I cook.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sufen Fong

    The recipes in this book are amazingly simple and result in great tasting dishes! As a novice, this book made it easy to get started with the right equipment, principles and ingredients. Although GREAT cooking is an art that takes years to perfect, I still felt like a GOOD cook after trying out some of the recipes in the book!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Great book, but This is a wonderful book for beginners and anyone wanting to improve their cooking skills. This Kindle version needs to be edited much better. There are multiple duplicate pages which makes following some recipes but more difficult. Photos are excellent.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Faber

    100 recipes from the author's "How to Cook Everything" that he thinks are basic, plus some that are "good to know".

  20. 5 out of 5

    Oberon

    I needed more basic. Didn't have much info for poultry. No turkey, no cornish hens, pigeon, etc.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Love this book. Buying a copy for my son when he moves out 👍🏻

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

    Accidentally marked this as open and mark as read on my ipad... I use this cook book often... Bittman is the master.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Máire Goggin

    Useful but forgot how measurements/ingredients would be listed in American English.....my bad but frustrating.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Georgie

    finally, a cookbook that patiently explained things to me like the baby i am. truly appreciated

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Bittman is the bomb.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Lee Smith

    Good for beginners. Teaches one all that is needed to cook. Photos were taken at the right time also. Thank you. Cook, no take out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Great cookbook for newbies! I really loved the skills section at the end that had colour photos of all the skills you need to make for a recipe.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Despina Panagakos Yeargin

    Well done! Great for beginner cooks. All the basics, clearly and plainly explained.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    Great book to have handy as it breaks down cooking terms and gives the novice the basics to build up their cooking repertoire.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Blanca Fernandez

    This is to a new generation of cooks what Betty Crocker’s Cookbook was to my generation. Highly recommended!

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