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“You are going to meet the real flesh-and-blood Shirley Jones, not just the movie star or Mrs. Partridge,” says the beloved film, television, and stage actress and singer of her long-awaited memoir, an account as shockingly direct, deliciously juicy, and delightfully frank as the performer herself. Sharing the “candid” (Los Angeles Times) and “revealing” (Associated Press) “You are going to meet the real flesh-and-blood Shirley Jones, not just the movie star or Mrs. Partridge,” says the beloved film, television, and stage actress and singer of her long-awaited memoir, an account as shockingly direct, deliciously juicy, and delightfully frank as the performer herself. Sharing the “candid” (Los Angeles Times) and “revealing” (Associated Press) details of her life in Hollywood’s inner circle and beyond, Shirley Jones blows past the wholesome, squeaky-clean image that first brought fame, and gives us a woman who only gets hotter with time. If the story of a rebellious, gifted small-town girl being discovered by Rodgers and Hammerstein isn’t thrilling enough, go deeper behind the scenes, where Shirley Jones portrays her tumultuous marriage to Jack Cassidy, the dashing and charismatic but deeply troubled actor who unlocked her highly charged sexuality and captured her heart forever. She talks openly about their passion-fueled relationship; the infidelities, the costar crushes, and sexual experimentation. She reflects on her relationship with stepson David Cassidy; her cult status as coolest-ever TV mom Shirley Partridge; her second marriage to wacky TV comedian and producer Marty Ingels; and much more in this “saucy” (Entertainment Weekly) self-portrait.


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“You are going to meet the real flesh-and-blood Shirley Jones, not just the movie star or Mrs. Partridge,” says the beloved film, television, and stage actress and singer of her long-awaited memoir, an account as shockingly direct, deliciously juicy, and delightfully frank as the performer herself. Sharing the “candid” (Los Angeles Times) and “revealing” (Associated Press) “You are going to meet the real flesh-and-blood Shirley Jones, not just the movie star or Mrs. Partridge,” says the beloved film, television, and stage actress and singer of her long-awaited memoir, an account as shockingly direct, deliciously juicy, and delightfully frank as the performer herself. Sharing the “candid” (Los Angeles Times) and “revealing” (Associated Press) details of her life in Hollywood’s inner circle and beyond, Shirley Jones blows past the wholesome, squeaky-clean image that first brought fame, and gives us a woman who only gets hotter with time. If the story of a rebellious, gifted small-town girl being discovered by Rodgers and Hammerstein isn’t thrilling enough, go deeper behind the scenes, where Shirley Jones portrays her tumultuous marriage to Jack Cassidy, the dashing and charismatic but deeply troubled actor who unlocked her highly charged sexuality and captured her heart forever. She talks openly about their passion-fueled relationship; the infidelities, the costar crushes, and sexual experimentation. She reflects on her relationship with stepson David Cassidy; her cult status as coolest-ever TV mom Shirley Partridge; her second marriage to wacky TV comedian and producer Marty Ingels; and much more in this “saucy” (Entertainment Weekly) self-portrait.

30 review for Shirley Jones: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    JoAnne Pulcino

    SHIRLEY JONES Shirley Jones Shirley Jones had and has a beautiful voice and is probably one of the luckiest stars in Hollywood. After winning a beauty contest she attracted the likes of Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein in her first audition, and the rest is history. She became the star of their musicals and road shows. At one point Ms. Jones talks about the self involved actors and their insecurities. Then she proceeds to fall in love with probably the most narcissistic, self centered, drunken SHIRLEY JONES Shirley Jones Shirley Jones had and has a beautiful voice and is probably one of the luckiest stars in Hollywood. After winning a beauty contest she attracted the likes of Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein in her first audition, and the rest is history. She became the star of their musicals and road shows. At one point Ms. Jones talks about the self involved actors and their insecurities. Then she proceeds to fall in love with probably the most narcissistic, self centered, drunken womanizer, Jack Cassidy. I believe her love for him was real, but she paid a terribly high price. For some reason Ms. Jones needs to strip herself of her goody two shoes image in the most graphic of depictions. I didn't need to know all about the details of her sexuality and her actions. Just sing, Shirley!!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Connie Curtis

    Wow. I never thought I'd be listening to a book where Mrs. Partridge is bragging about how sexual she is and describing how she masturbates. For the record, I read other reviews and was ready to fast forward over the grisly details of how she pleasures herself even today. When she launched into it, I skipped that rather lengthy part until she was through. I'll never understand why people want to ruin their reputations when they are known for being a clean goody-goody or a decent person. What's s Wow. I never thought I'd be listening to a book where Mrs. Partridge is bragging about how sexual she is and describing how she masturbates. For the record, I read other reviews and was ready to fast forward over the grisly details of how she pleasures herself even today. When she launched into it, I skipped that rather lengthy part until she was through. I'll never understand why people want to ruin their reputations when they are known for being a clean goody-goody or a decent person. What's so wrong with that? People love to destroy that reputation and make sure we know they aren't really that good or clean or moral in person. Shirley Jones certainly does that in this book. I didn't want to hear about the size of her sons' and husband's genitals. I wanted to hear more stories and anecdotes. She went on about how nearly every man she's ever met has hit on her and how obsessed she was (and still is) with her former husband, Jack Cassidy, a true cad if there ever was one. I felt bad for her currant husband as she describes Jack as the love of her life. I guess Marty's chopped liver? I'm always disappointed when people fall from the pedestal we've placed them on, because we like having someone we think we can look up to. Some things should be kept private. Shirley Jones clearly has no privacy issues. I have lost respect for her, for her lack of decency and her assumption that we wanted to know all these details of her very private life. Someday, she may be very embarrassed by what she has blabbed about herself and others in this memoir. Tabloids spray garbage at us all the time about the private lives of celebrities. The sad thing is, she did it willingly.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This book was disappointing. I really looked forward to this book because I wanted to learn more about Shirley Jones since I only knew her from The Partridge Family. This book was poorly written - no way around that. Shirley's co-author didn't do her any favors. It reads like a freshman paper. It rambles and repeats. This story is really about Shirley and Jack Cassidy. She goes on an on about how much she LOVES him. We get it. You're still caught in the web of dysfunction known as Jack Cassidy. M This book was disappointing. I really looked forward to this book because I wanted to learn more about Shirley Jones since I only knew her from The Partridge Family. This book was poorly written - no way around that. Shirley's co-author didn't do her any favors. It reads like a freshman paper. It rambles and repeats. This story is really about Shirley and Jack Cassidy. She goes on an on about how much she LOVES him. We get it. You're still caught in the web of dysfunction known as Jack Cassidy. Ms. Jones reveals way too much personal information about her sex life. It's sad because she comes across as the "good" girl who wants so badly to be considered a "bad" girl that she tries too hard. The strangest thing about this book is the amount of time Shirley dedicates to her life with Jack Cassidy versus the amount of time dedicated to her life with her husband of 30+ years, Marty Ingle. She shares very little about this time. Instead, she dwells on telling a one-sided story about a man who is no longer here to defend himself. For someone whose entire career came so easily to her, writing sure didn't. I was thoroughly disappointed in this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Is there a way to wash my eyes out with soap? Can I clean out my mind and unread what I just read? Honestly, who wants Shirley Jones to explain her masturbatory techniques in detail? Did I need to know that David Cassidy inherited his donkey-sized penis from his father? This is one of those misguided memoirs, where salacious details are thrown onto almost every page to up book sales. Admittedly, it works. This book has gotten a lot of publicity. The only thing I really learned about Shirley Jones Is there a way to wash my eyes out with soap? Can I clean out my mind and unread what I just read? Honestly, who wants Shirley Jones to explain her masturbatory techniques in detail? Did I need to know that David Cassidy inherited his donkey-sized penis from his father? This is one of those misguided memoirs, where salacious details are thrown onto almost every page to up book sales. Admittedly, it works. This book has gotten a lot of publicity. The only thing I really learned about Shirley Jones from reading this, is that she has an unerring ability to marry creepy, off-putting men. Also, she doesn't mind tattling on her husbands, children, co-workers and friends.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    As a young boy growing up in the late 50's, I enjoyed musicals. Top among my favorites were Oklahoma and Carousel both staring Gordon McRae and Shirley Jones. Both performers had golden voices. To me, I imagined that the pure, idyllic love portrayed in these two masterpieces was but an extension of each actor's personal life and moral values. I have not yet read a biography of the life of Gordon McRae, but upon reading Shirley Jones' new autobiography, my idealism was turned on its head. Call me As a young boy growing up in the late 50's, I enjoyed musicals. Top among my favorites were Oklahoma and Carousel both staring Gordon McRae and Shirley Jones. Both performers had golden voices. To me, I imagined that the pure, idyllic love portrayed in these two masterpieces was but an extension of each actor's personal life and moral values. I have not yet read a biography of the life of Gordon McRae, but upon reading Shirley Jones' new autobiography, my idealism was turned on its head. Call me naive - say "you should have known better" - tell me "this is just Hollywood." Still, I was disappointed. Through the years, the images of the lovely, feminine, virtuous Laurie and Julie became icons for me and represented all that was good in womanhood. As to their characters, they still are. Yet, now knowing the personal life of the actress who created them, I have felt a let-down. In her autobiography, Shirley Jones discusses in detail her two husbands, the two loves of her life (Jack Cassidy and Marty Ingels). She talks about her step-son, David Cassidy, and about her three sons, Shaun, Ryan and Patrick. Shirley was very much a devoted and loving wife and mother and did much to be with and support her children, especially in their times of difficulty. She also speaks of her fierce independence of spirit, her dedication to career, and very candidly about her views on sexuality and "sex". She is often explicit - which was a bit shocking to me (since I had always placed her on such a pedestal). Readers: caveat emptor. But again, perhaps this is Hollywood (or worse yet, perhaps this is America). As I read her biography, I was struck with the impression that she wanted to be honest, candid and frank with her readers about her life (and she was). She wanted the world to know how "open minded" she was about each person's right to live his life as he desires and that we should not pass judgment on others for doing so. In that sentiment we are in accord. However, it is one thing to accept people for who they are and what they do, but quite another to aid and abet them in their deviant lifestyles and even (in the name of love and support of spouse) embrace those lifestyles. (To her credit, as she states in her biography, she sometimes participated in practices with her husband or because of her husband, Jack Cassidy, she didn't feel comfortable with and would not have done on her own). It seems to me that each person needs to establish personal principles of morality and decency, then draw a line in the sand. One should never allow himself to become so "open minded" that his brains fall out. Call me old fashioned, but I firmly believe that the "new morality" is nothing more nor less than the old immorality eschewed by the prophets of the Old Testament and the Savior in the New Testament and that our greatest happiness (in this life and in the next) can only be achieved by adhering to principles of virtue, especially in sexual matters; that is, abstinence from sex before marriage and complete fidelity to one's spouse after marriage. If mistakes are made, sincere repentance and reformation are always available. That is the wonderful thing about the Atonement of Jesus Christ. It is my view that only on these principles can an eternal marriage and family unit be established and preserved, through the help of a merciful Savior and a loving Heavenly Father.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I have been a fan of musicals since I was a very young child. This book was a huge disappointment to me. Not sure what she was thinking. She wants us all to know she's a bad girl. If I want to read about threesomes and masturbation, I'll read erotica. No, I wanted to know why she was chosen to play Marian over Barbara Cook, and scuttlebutt on all the people in Oklahoma, Music Man, Carousel, Elmer Gantry et al. I also thought she really puts down her current husband, Marty Ingels, while making a g I have been a fan of musicals since I was a very young child. This book was a huge disappointment to me. Not sure what she was thinking. She wants us all to know she's a bad girl. If I want to read about threesomes and masturbation, I'll read erotica. No, I wanted to know why she was chosen to play Marian over Barbara Cook, and scuttlebutt on all the people in Oklahoma, Music Man, Carousel, Elmer Gantry et al. I also thought she really puts down her current husband, Marty Ingels, while making a god (lower case g) out of Jack Cassidy, who, by Jones' own admission is an addicted cad. Don't bother.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Have you ever finished reading a biography of a celebrity and felt like you should go take a shower? Maybe a cold one? Have you ever finished reading a celebrity bio and felt like you had just rummaged through their underwear drawer? Well, here you go! Here’s one. Courtesy of the legendary movie musical star Shirley Jones and her co-writer Wendy Leigh, here’s a tell-all that leaves nothing untold. As Jones warns the reader in her introduction, if you’re looking for Laurey, Julie or Marian the lib Have you ever finished reading a biography of a celebrity and felt like you should go take a shower? Maybe a cold one? Have you ever finished reading a celebrity bio and felt like you had just rummaged through their underwear drawer? Well, here you go! Here’s one. Courtesy of the legendary movie musical star Shirley Jones and her co-writer Wendy Leigh, here’s a tell-all that leaves nothing untold. As Jones warns the reader in her introduction, if you’re looking for Laurey, Julie or Marian the librarian, (her iconic film roles in “Oklahoma, Carousel and The Music Man”), in these pages, you won’t find them here. Jones claims, “I have never myself been that innocent or ever been that kind of an ingénue.” Jones and Leigh set out in this 290-page memoir to prove that this “small-town girl from Smithton, Pennsylvania” is not Mrs. Partridge yet not a “spoiled Hollywood movie star or a jaded TV icon, either.” To quote an infamous banner hung on a US-Navy aircraft carrier that got Bush 43 in trouble, “mission accomplished.” Read this and you’ll never see Shirley Jones as a librarian ever again. Jones and Leigh leave no stone unturned, or thrown. It’s all documented here. The illicit affairs, the adultery, the illegal drugs, “the excessive drinking . . . (the) constant infidelity,” the lousy parenting, the bi-polar husbands, the fireplace-fueled mental breakdown, the drug and mental rehab centers, the fatal apartment fire, the group sex, the lesbian and homosexual sex, the solo sex. The authors have succeeded in “ripping away the seven veils and (have revealed) every facet of Shirley Jones.” This is one bio that might make even radio shock jock Howard Stern blush.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mediaman

    This poorly-written memoir is filled with facts and details that focuses on others and too much on sexuality but not enough on Shirley Jones or consequences of the crazy choices she made. She hasn't done herself or her fans any good writing it this way. The book is two-thirds about other people (usually the men in her life) and one-third about her sex life, including TMI on masturbating, a threesome, invitation to swinging, how well endowed her sons are, etc. The bulk of the book is really about This poorly-written memoir is filled with facts and details that focuses on others and too much on sexuality but not enough on Shirley Jones or consequences of the crazy choices she made. She hasn't done herself or her fans any good writing it this way. The book is two-thirds about other people (usually the men in her life) and one-third about her sex life, including TMI on masturbating, a threesome, invitation to swinging, how well endowed her sons are, etc. The bulk of the book is really about her marriage to Jack Cassidy and the choice she makes to stick with him through his drinking problems, sleeping around with hundreds of women, and mental issues. It makes no sense. A song in the musical Oklahoma, which Jones starred in, says "I'm Just a Girl Who Can't Say No" and that appears to be Shirley's problem. She should have stood up to Cassidy instead of claiming such passionate love for him that she let him walk all over her and get away with being a bad father. Sadly, she states in the book that he is her one true love 30 years after his death because there are few redeeming qualities about him. (This certainly can't be easy for her second husband to accept!) The book is filled with contradictions that also make no sense. At one point she claims she never cheated on Cassidy, then goes on to tell stories of how she passionately kissed other men and even went to bed with one! She says a director never gave any on-set directions, then tells a story about a direction he gave! She says she didn't cheat on second husband Marty Ingels, then gives an example of cheating on him. Her distorted view of reality shows that she has no real moral base and is nothing like her on-screen persona. Even worse are the various factual errors in the book. Jack Cassidy didn't play Ted Baxter's "twin brother" in the Mary Tyler Moore show (he played Ted's younger brother) and his series He & She was in the 1960s, not the 1970s. Fred Silverman wasn't the one who "created All in the Family, The Waltons and Charlie's Angels," he was just the network programmer who put them on the air. The biggest whopper is that she claims the role she played on Partridge Family was the "first working mother" on TV (not even close--just think of Julia as a nurse a few years earlier). And her stepson David Cassidy certainly wasn't a "rock God" nor the "biggest rock star of the century" (which she claims twice). The entire book has the feel of someone who doesn't quite have all of her facts straight, loves to exaggerate, and the co-author didn't do the work to fact check. That being said the book has plenty of great stories about her on-screen work and is worth reading. She isn't afraid to name names and give her opinion on co-stars she loved and co-stars she hated. She gets pretty specific about the famous people who made passes at her and probably has embarrassed some. But she is unapologetic through it all, which is the book's weakness. She is a poor role model for women, wives and mothers that tolerate abuse, and should be more introspective about the terrible choices she made.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I am a fan of Shirley Jones. I liked her in movies like Oklahoma, The Music Man,and Elmer Gantry. And of course, The Partridge Family.I enjoyed her memoir for the most part. She was very honest about her life.I was amused reading about her childhood that she was a bit of a strong willed "rebel.I wish she had given a few more details about her work in movies and The Partridge Family. And the actors she worked with. She was up front about her marriage to Jack Cassidy and all the affairs he had. S I am a fan of Shirley Jones. I liked her in movies like Oklahoma, The Music Man,and Elmer Gantry. And of course, The Partridge Family.I enjoyed her memoir for the most part. She was very honest about her life.I was amused reading about her childhood that she was a bit of a strong willed "rebel.I wish she had given a few more details about her work in movies and The Partridge Family. And the actors she worked with. She was up front about her marriage to Jack Cassidy and all the affairs he had. Sometimes not treating her very nice and being too tough on his sons.yet she was still in love with him in spite of how he treated her. Not impressed with how "endowed" Jack was or her other family members endowment..really not interested in other people's sex lives but oh well. I guess this lets us know she is NOT Shirley Partridge or Laurey from Oklahoma. She has spent the last 35 years married to Marty Ingels. I remember over the years how some wondering about this match but so what. They are still married and love each other.I liked getting to read about her relationship with her step son David Cassidy her co star in The Partridge Family. and her three sons Shaun,Patrick, and Ryan. This was a good read. If you want to know a bit more about this talented actress.I did like this memoir.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Oh Mrs. Partridge, you dirty bird! I personally think no one has any business writing a memoir if they are not willing to be 100% candid about their life. Shirley Jones has told her story honestly and without shame and for that I give her credit. A lot of the details divulged in this book will shock and maybe disappoint fans of 1950's musical comedies and 1970's clean-cut sitcoms. I'll admit that I raised my eyebrows a time or two while reading this book. I was not as shocked by the stories of b Oh Mrs. Partridge, you dirty bird! I personally think no one has any business writing a memoir if they are not willing to be 100% candid about their life. Shirley Jones has told her story honestly and without shame and for that I give her credit. A lot of the details divulged in this book will shock and maybe disappoint fans of 1950's musical comedies and 1970's clean-cut sitcoms. I'll admit that I raised my eyebrows a time or two while reading this book. I was not as shocked by the stories of bad choices, adultery and recreational drug use as I was by who these revelations were coming from. I think that is exactly the point. Some readers have questioned why Shirley Jones would write a book like this. I think the answer is that you write a memoir so that you will be remembered at you really were. In this "Shirley Jones: A Memoir" is successful. She is a strong-willed, loyal and hard-working woman who has loved well (if not always wisely) who remains vibrant and sexually active in her eighties. Good for her! I hope someone will be able to say the same about me someday.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scot

    I was given this book as a gift, so I read it. If you are or have ever been a fan of Shirley Jones, and admire her beautiful singing voice, or the pleasant demeanor she could often convey whether in a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical or as Mrs. Partridge, I would suggest you just keep that image of her and let that suffice. It is true, as a result of this book, I learned a bit more about Jack Cassidy—at least from her perspective—than I knew before, but generally the writing style was choppy and I was given this book as a gift, so I read it. If you are or have ever been a fan of Shirley Jones, and admire her beautiful singing voice, or the pleasant demeanor she could often convey whether in a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical or as Mrs. Partridge, I would suggest you just keep that image of her and let that suffice. It is true, as a result of this book, I learned a bit more about Jack Cassidy—at least from her perspective—than I knew before, but generally the writing style was choppy and breezy, with explanations rather simplistic and most characters discussed presented in a rather two dimensional fashion. I blame the ghost writer, Wendy Leigh, for this (some serious editing was needed) but ultimately, Shirley approved it and it bears her imprimatur, so she must take responsibility for what she shares and how she shares it. I guess I could have seen this coming—I recall seeing Shirley Jones and Doris Roberts trying to get jiggy and have some raunchy grandma cougar sex with millennials (for laughs) in a 2006 movie trailer for Grandma’s Boy and thinking “do you need the money that badly?”—but maybe it’s a desire to stay in the limelight, no matter the cost. I’m no prude (I guess I sound like one here, don’t I? Well, let’s recast that to “I’ve never thought of myself as a prude") and to be honest, it was interesting to read her discussion of her husband’s legendary penis size, but I was weirded out a tad when she then compared his endowment with those of her rock star sons. If she really started getting into masturbation more often as she went into her 70s, I truly am happy for her if it brings her pleasure—I just don’t need to know about it. A lot of the celebrity namedropping that pervades the book fell into three quick categories: 1) did they try to have sex with me and if it occurred how were they, 2) was snooty to me so I didn’t like them, 3)was nice to me so I did. Although she paints herself as a headstrong, determined only child, I get the sense from the behaviors and activities she explains away that she felt entitled in her little town and was very self-centered. Perhaps it was therapeutic for her to share all the infidelities she stoically endured, her husband’s mental illness and terrible death, the trauma her kids must have experienced, along with flaunting all the private jets rides and gifts (as well as come ons) from rich and powerful suitors—it just seemed tawdry to me. I was hoping for deeper personal reflection and philosophical depth. At least she thought young Ron Howard was a darling to work with on The Music Man and Jimmy Stewart a kind and caring man. I take some solace in those affirmations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anthony McGill

    VERY CANDID AND A GOOD READ. Not your standard show biz autobiography, this Shirley Jones memoir is a very interesting and entertaining book. Her early career and rapid rise to stardom via her remarkable performances in Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals, her Oscar winning turn in 'Elmer Gantry' and top rating gig in 'The Partridge Family' among other film, stage and television work is covered in brief but adequate fashion. But it is the other side of Shirley with the emphasis on her marriages to Ja VERY CANDID AND A GOOD READ. Not your standard show biz autobiography, this Shirley Jones memoir is a very interesting and entertaining book. Her early career and rapid rise to stardom via her remarkable performances in Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals, her Oscar winning turn in 'Elmer Gantry' and top rating gig in 'The Partridge Family' among other film, stage and television work is covered in brief but adequate fashion. But it is the other side of Shirley with the emphasis on her marriages to Jack Cassidy and Marty Ingels that dominate this book and will no doubt intrigue and sometimes shock her devoted fans. All the ups and downs and dramas are all candidly explored; as well as her relationships with step-son David, and sons Shaun, Patrick and Ryan. To me this memoir came across as honest and informative, never self-obsessed or tiresome. Her comments on such things as female sexuality will no doubt raise eyebrows. A candid, worthwhile reminisce by a fine entertainer.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Hoerner

    Shirley Jones tries really hard in this book to make you understand she isn't the sweet ingenue from Oklahoma or the sensible single mother from the Partridge Family. She wants you to realize that she is a sexual being. Frankly, it was the rumors of the raunchy bits that made me pick up this book. Unfortunately, it came across like your mother telling you about her sex life. Eww! She spent more than a page on her masturbation habits, made reference to an enjoyment of porn and made sure we all kn Shirley Jones tries really hard in this book to make you understand she isn't the sweet ingenue from Oklahoma or the sensible single mother from the Partridge Family. She wants you to realize that she is a sexual being. Frankly, it was the rumors of the raunchy bits that made me pick up this book. Unfortunately, it came across like your mother telling you about her sex life. Eww! She spent more than a page on her masturbation habits, made reference to an enjoyment of porn and made sure we all knew that her first husband, Jack Cassidy, and all his sons are well endowed, especially David. While I am sure David is glad to have that out in the world, you don't really want it coming from your stepmother. I now have mental pictures of Shirley Jones that I can never unsee. I may need therapy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bonita

    I enjoyed this memoir. It is clear that Ms Jones was a very self possessed and talented young woman. It is true the focus was strongly on her relationship to Jack Cassidy, but as it was a very defining facet of her life, this made sense to me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    I blame Phil Donahue. He spawned Jerry Springer, Maury, and yes, Oprah, and the concepts of shame, privacy, and dignity have gone right out the window. Not to mention respect for the privacy of others. Aside from that, "Shirley Jones" is poorly written. The prose doesn't flow, but often reads like bullet points. The editing, too, was shoddy, for example, "the...incident caused me to loose trust..." Aargh. Jones gets two stars for the stories behind some of her movies (there were no new Partridge F I blame Phil Donahue. He spawned Jerry Springer, Maury, and yes, Oprah, and the concepts of shame, privacy, and dignity have gone right out the window. Not to mention respect for the privacy of others. Aside from that, "Shirley Jones" is poorly written. The prose doesn't flow, but often reads like bullet points. The editing, too, was shoddy, for example, "the...incident caused me to loose trust..." Aargh. Jones gets two stars for the stories behind some of her movies (there were no new Partridge Family tidbits for any fan who's watched retrospectives over the years), and some of the mentions of Hollywood's Golden Age elite. I was relieved that she didn't have any sexcapades with Jimmy Stewart and Cary Grant. If you're a fan of Jones' work, you'll probably feel compelled to read this, but you'll want to shower when you're done.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Toto66

    this book was just plain weird. I can't for the life of me figure out why this renowned actress and oscar winner would come out with such a poorly written trashy memoir such as this. It's always interesting to read the inside scoop on the movie industry but this book did nothing for me except tarnish my image of Shirley Jones. I know she is a public figure but it's been 60 years and none of her sexual exploits have ever come out...not to mention her 'appreciation' of self love. Why at almost 80 this book was just plain weird. I can't for the life of me figure out why this renowned actress and oscar winner would come out with such a poorly written trashy memoir such as this. It's always interesting to read the inside scoop on the movie industry but this book did nothing for me except tarnish my image of Shirley Jones. I know she is a public figure but it's been 60 years and none of her sexual exploits have ever come out...not to mention her 'appreciation' of self love. Why at almost 80 would you spill all this trash about your younger years? I guess she needed a shot in the old bank account. PS: I read the David Cassidy autobiography right after this one and I swear half of her book came from his...and almost word for word. What a waste of money.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Martie Nees Record

    I always said that I wasn’t above reading crap but this wasn’t fun crap but downright uncomfortable reading. I love gossip but in this tell all memoir one learns how(in detail)she still self pleasures herself, yuck! And, that her sons, and stepson, are all well endowed, double yuck. Besides TMI, the writing was repetitive. I don’t know who co-authored the book but he or she is in dire need of a writing class. I can’t believe that I spent Kindle money on this. Triple Yuck!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Easily read over a weekend. Some of my favorite lines: "Nowadays, I have a martini every afternoon at five, but other than that, I never indulge in alcohol." "I've always been an extremely sexual woman, easily aroused, and intensely orgasmic. Despite my advanced years, that hasn't changed a bit. And it's often easier for me to achieve it through masturbation." "When David (Cassidy) became the rock star of the century ..." THIS BOOK IS FULL OF GEMS! Easily read over a weekend. Some of my favorite lines: "Nowadays, I have a martini every afternoon at five, but other than that, I never indulge in alcohol." "I've always been an extremely sexual woman, easily aroused, and intensely orgasmic. Despite my advanced years, that hasn't changed a bit. And it's often easier for me to achieve it through masturbation." "When David (Cassidy) became the rock star of the century ..." THIS BOOK IS FULL OF GEMS!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    No, I won't be finishing this. I think in common with many older movie stars, Ms Jones "remembers it the way she wants to remember it." And that starts from her youngest memories; from the mother who ignores her as she screams from her crib and later administers "paddlings" with whatever comes to hand--hairbrush, spatula, whatever--on a daily or twice-daily basis for real or imagined infractions, to her sweet, loving daddy who just happens to come home often so drunk his wife has to undress him No, I won't be finishing this. I think in common with many older movie stars, Ms Jones "remembers it the way she wants to remember it." And that starts from her youngest memories; from the mother who ignores her as she screams from her crib and later administers "paddlings" with whatever comes to hand--hairbrush, spatula, whatever--on a daily or twice-daily basis for real or imagined infractions, to her sweet, loving daddy who just happens to come home often so drunk his wife has to undress him and put him to bed. This is the childhood she repeatedly calls "ideal", "Norman Rockwell", "idyllic" and "perfect." Already I was thinking, "Ugh, do I want to read this?" In the Prologue she engages in the most furious namedropping of what she considers "contemporary" stars (like Farrah Fawcett-Majors--does anyone remember her?) and this is a tendency that does not wane. She harps on her wide-eyed innocence, all the time expanding on how she manipulated men and "got quite good" at writing Dear John letters to cut any strings. And then her two childhood sweethearts just happen to die days after she revisits them to "wish them well." My goodness. Black Widow, anyone? The scene where she meets Mae West and finds her "half-naked on the sofa with a fur coat" had me worried; were she and Mae gonna have it away? No, but she would have you believe Ms West knew she was in the theatre and sent for her to tell her she was gonna be a big staaaaaaaaaar. Yeah. Right. Like they do. So I toodled onto the book review page here on GR, only to find out that this granny has also tried her hand (so to speak) at writing erotica, including a blow-by-blow account (so to speak) of Sex for One. Ugh. No, don't think so. So many books, so little time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoy reading biographies and memoirs of people who work in the entertainment industry. This book had its fair share of the backstage behind the scenes tid-bits of information that I enjoy. I understand that her husband, Jack Cassidy, played a big part in her life, both personally and professionally. I am not a prude, and I also enjoy reading somewhat racy novels, but in my opinion, it would have been sufficient to say something like "Jack persuaded me to participate in a threesome with anothe I enjoy reading biographies and memoirs of people who work in the entertainment industry. This book had its fair share of the backstage behind the scenes tid-bits of information that I enjoy. I understand that her husband, Jack Cassidy, played a big part in her life, both personally and professionally. I am not a prude, and I also enjoy reading somewhat racy novels, but in my opinion, it would have been sufficient to say something like "Jack persuaded me to participate in a threesome with another woman in the cast." That would have been enough to tell us what happened without a step by step account of who put whose hand where. If she felt it was necessary to her story to inform us that she still needs to pleasure herself, okay. But I didn't expect to read the word "masturbation" multiple times in her book and to hear that she uses "Vaseline and a finger" I thought was too much information. She is a talented lady with a long show business career. I would have liked to hear even more about her movies and musicals and less about her sex life.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    The book is her world view, but I am not certain why she decided to reveal it. This is a talented singer and actress, but maybe too much time spent with the "zany" Marty Ingels has made her willing to divulge parts of her life that don't need airing. Not sure how her stepson David is feeling about her revelation on the size of his penis (thank god she did not reveal how she knew), or how her sons feel about evidently losing the contest in that area. It would have been a better book if there was The book is her world view, but I am not certain why she decided to reveal it. This is a talented singer and actress, but maybe too much time spent with the "zany" Marty Ingels has made her willing to divulge parts of her life that don't need airing. Not sure how her stepson David is feeling about her revelation on the size of his penis (thank god she did not reveal how she knew), or how her sons feel about evidently losing the contest in that area. It would have been a better book if there was more about how she created characters for her performances, about how she learned about phrasing and emoting lyrics, even about choosing parts than about the sexual side of the business. Shirley Jones always had an image of a classy, smart, gifted woman. This book does not enhance that image...it tarnishes it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    After all the hullabaloo about this book, I was curious. I was expecting it to be much more salacious than it was, although, the last chapter, yeah, well, I could have lived the rest of my life *not* know that Ms. Jones has seemingly mastered the art of masturbation. Good for her, but really? This is the second autobiography that has left me wondering: where was her editor?? While I enjoyed the behind the scenes look at her life, this book was not that well written. And by that I mean: it was ba After all the hullabaloo about this book, I was curious. I was expecting it to be much more salacious than it was, although, the last chapter, yeah, well, I could have lived the rest of my life *not* know that Ms. Jones has seemingly mastered the art of masturbation. Good for her, but really? This is the second autobiography that has left me wondering: where was her editor?? While I enjoyed the behind the scenes look at her life, this book was not that well written. And by that I mean: it was badly written. Not everyone is a writer -- those that aren't, but still want there story told, should HIRE a writer to write it for them. That said, I read the whole book on a flight to California, so it must have been good enough to hold my attention for 5 hours. That's why it gets 3 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ruthann

    This book is very candid and full of TMI about her sexuality. Yes, I did want to know about who slept with who, but I don't need the intimate details about it. I lost respect for her putting up with Jack and his affairs, threesomes and so on. She justifies everything he did that she just loved him, what about respect for herself. Honestly, who cares how and what she does as a seventy-nine years old in the bedroom. I bet her kids love the sexual details she mentions about them. How does she know This book is very candid and full of TMI about her sexuality. Yes, I did want to know about who slept with who, but I don't need the intimate details about it. I lost respect for her putting up with Jack and his affairs, threesomes and so on. She justifies everything he did that she just loved him, what about respect for herself. Honestly, who cares how and what she does as a seventy-nine years old in the bedroom. I bet her kids love the sexual details she mentions about them. How does she know that David is huge like his dad? Did we really need to know that. The book is a quick read, but TMI ruined the book for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Having been the biggest "The Partridge Family" fan ever as a young girl, I enjoyed this memoir by Shirley Jones. It's a quick and entertaining read. (Warning: there is way more information about her sexuality than I needed to know, especially near the end of the novel.) Oh, Mrs. Partridge!!! LOL. Having been the biggest "The Partridge Family" fan ever as a young girl, I enjoyed this memoir by Shirley Jones. It's a quick and entertaining read. (Warning: there is way more information about her sexuality than I needed to know, especially near the end of the novel.) Oh, Mrs. Partridge!!! LOL.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Russell J. Sanders

    In their sitcom, Jane Fonda’s and Lily Tomlin’s characters develop and market a sex toy for older women. This, of course, is played for laughs, but the two make a great case for the vibrancy of those in advanced years. Shirley Jones, in her Memoir, makes that case as well. I’ve heard people say, “Well, now that I’m older, I can say anything I want because I don’t care what people think of me.” I do think Jones cares about what people think of her, but she wants people to think of her in a differ In their sitcom, Jane Fonda’s and Lily Tomlin’s characters develop and market a sex toy for older women. This, of course, is played for laughs, but the two make a great case for the vibrancy of those in advanced years. Shirley Jones, in her Memoir, makes that case as well. I’ve heard people say, “Well, now that I’m older, I can say anything I want because I don’t care what people think of me.” I do think Jones cares about what people think of her, but she wants people to think of her in a different way than they think of her legendary characters Laurey in Oklahoma!, Marian the Librarian in The Music Man, or Shirley Partridge in The Partridge Family. She makes very clear from the beginning of her book that those were just characters and that she is much more complex—and much more sexual—than her pristine movie star image projected. We saw her range in her award-winning role in Elmer Gantry, but that pesky “good girl” image still persisted after she won her award for playing a prostitute. Her memoir, however, dispels the myth of Shirley Jones as she paints the portrait of a woman who loves sex and is not afraid to talk about it. She is also not afraid to talk about her marriages to two extremely complex men. She admits the love of her life—the father of her three sons—was Jack Cassidy, a supremely talented egomaniacal philanderer, whom she stuck by because she loved him so dearly that she was able to cope with his peccadilloes and defer to his craziness. When the two eventually divorced, she met and married Marty Ingels, the comedian, whom she admits is almost as crazy but not as unstable as her first husband. That marriage has lasted four decades, so it apparently has been a good match for her. This book is for her fans, as long as they can cope with the fact she is not the goody-two-shoes they may envision. While she is raw at times, she is always engaging, full of anecdotes about celebrities she has known and worked with. And that is what Hollywood autobiography should be, not some sugar-coated vision of what the star wants us to believe.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria Menozzi

    I steered clear of this book after reading a review. I picked it up in the library because I needed a fast read and since this woman was at one time, an idol of mine, I thought what the hell. I was a Partridge Family junkie and David Cassidy devotee at 8 years of age. I have diary entries to prove it. None that I would like to share at all at any time ever. I also loved the movies Carousel and Elmer Gantry and The Music Man. Although I was a singer myself in my youth, I did not particularly love I steered clear of this book after reading a review. I picked it up in the library because I needed a fast read and since this woman was at one time, an idol of mine, I thought what the hell. I was a Partridge Family junkie and David Cassidy devotee at 8 years of age. I have diary entries to prove it. None that I would like to share at all at any time ever. I also loved the movies Carousel and Elmer Gantry and The Music Man. Although I was a singer myself in my youth, I did not particularly love Jones' voice. That being said, I had to preface this review with a background because what I am about to write is not complimentary. I read it in one sitting; the writing is not bad at all. Her mater-of-fact observations about some of her co-stars and also the actors' version of a sacred cow, Lee Strasberg, are refreshing, yes, candid but honest. It is a candid, honest memoir but geez, do I need to read about how well-endowed your first husband was and your stepson? I mean, really, what were you thinking? You think that is the most shocking thing and then toward the end of the book I am reading about how many times a day Shirley enjoys masturbating. Oh and that her discussions about masturbation include her octogenarian friends. Here's the thing, I think it's great, go for it, but why do I need to read about it in your memoir? Write a lovely sex book for octogenarians or seniors or whatever which might be valuable to some, I don't know. Having lived in Los Angeles for 14 years, this doesn't surprise me because some of the most "over-sexed" (as Shirley calls it) people I knew were all in their 60's, 50's and 70's and they all did drugs to boot. Still caught in that whole 1960-70's era which is long gone, hello? And it's not called "over-sexed" Shirley, it's call sex addiction. What I am really shocked about is that she doesn't even discuss whether she ever got VD, STD or HIV or anyone she knew from all that promiscuity that was being had in her circles. If you're going to 'fess up, how about a little bit of advocacy for responsibility. Just pass this one up.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Botner

    As someone who grew up watching The Partridge Family, I was interested in this memoir. Unfortunately, except for a few insider tidbits, it was a big disappointment. The writing was annoyingly repetitive, so much so that it throws the reader off. "Didn't I just read this?" Someone must have told her to put lots of sex in it, since there is plenty of that. I really didn't need to know (repeatedly) how "well-endowed" both Jack and David Cassidy are. Seems all men hit on Shirley...or at least she exp As someone who grew up watching The Partridge Family, I was interested in this memoir. Unfortunately, except for a few insider tidbits, it was a big disappointment. The writing was annoyingly repetitive, so much so that it throws the reader off. "Didn't I just read this?" Someone must have told her to put lots of sex in it, since there is plenty of that. I really didn't need to know (repeatedly) how "well-endowed" both Jack and David Cassidy are. Seems all men hit on Shirley...or at least she expects them to...that got annoying. Also got tired of reading over and over about how highly sexed she is. Wish she just had a badge she could wear. This read more like a first draft than a completed book. There is never much depth to any of her experiences in her major roles. Mostly it reads as a check-list of famous people she's known. Much was made of her relationship with her father, but soon after her career takes off, he is never heard from again. The last chapter seemed to be more of a "let's get the word count up" and read very disjointed with a quick summary of her and her sons lives. While the primary focus of the book seems to be about her relationship with Jack, the love of her life. I found myself more and more disappointed in her for staying with someone who was such a terrible husband and father. Can't say that I respect her at all after reading this book. Biggest bombshell was a threesome with the philandering husband and a showgirl and Shirley. Would have rather heard more about her experiences on the different movies and shows. I was very glad that I got this from the library and didn't spend any money on it. It wasn't worth it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary Botkin

    Interesting, but I'm not exactly sure why I needed to know how Shirley Jones practices the art of self-love. Sure, we all do it, but did I need to get such a graphic play-by-play? I'm happy that she is still a very sexual woman. Still, I am wondering why she felt the need to be so graphic about it. I am also wondering what her son, Patrick, is thinking. You'll understand why I say that after you read it. As a longtime fan of her son, Shaun, I was very curious about this memoir. Knowing how priva Interesting, but I'm not exactly sure why I needed to know how Shirley Jones practices the art of self-love. Sure, we all do it, but did I need to get such a graphic play-by-play? I'm happy that she is still a very sexual woman. Still, I am wondering why she felt the need to be so graphic about it. I am also wondering what her son, Patrick, is thinking. You'll understand why I say that after you read it. As a longtime fan of her son, Shaun, I was very curious about this memoir. Knowing how private a person he is, I'm betting that he instructed her not to divulge any personal info about him, and I'm glad. I have to say that I was a bit let down by some parts. A big portion of this book was basically written and published years ago in Shirley Marty An Unlikely Love Story Why the need to re-write it? I get that they split and then reconciled, but much of this book is just a repeat of the previous book. It was an interesting read. I always had a sneaking suspicion that sweet Shirley Jones was a minx! This proved me correct in my assumptions!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda Doyle

    I swallowed this book whole in one sitting and enjoyed it enough not to regurgitate. But it is flawed, despite being highly readable and entertaining. This memoir has been criticized for being too open and providing TMI. But isn't that why we read celeb bios? Presumably we want to find out more about a celebrity we think we know and love. I read few celeb bios. I chose this one because since I first saw Carousel many years ago, I've loved Shirley Jones's heavenly singing voice. This memoir reveal I swallowed this book whole in one sitting and enjoyed it enough not to regurgitate. But it is flawed, despite being highly readable and entertaining. This memoir has been criticized for being too open and providing TMI. But isn't that why we read celeb bios? Presumably we want to find out more about a celebrity we think we know and love. I read few celeb bios. I chose this one because since I first saw Carousel many years ago, I've loved Shirley Jones's heavenly singing voice. This memoir reveals that she is quite different from what one might expect. But the real negatives of this memoir are the poor writing style (unorganized format, too much repetition) and too much emphasis on her first marriage to Jack Cassidy, who comes off as a narcissistic mess of a man. He was such an unpleasant individual (or is portrayed as such)that I didn't enjoy reading that much about him, and his story left a sour taste in my mouth. Nevertheless, I came away from this memoir with a feeling of respect for a basically decent woman who made some terrible choices in her life; at the same time, she appreciates her good fortune and refuses to feel sorry for herself.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    Overall, I enjoyed the book, learning a lot more about Shirley Jones' life. I basically only know her as Shirley Partridge and from her musicals, so it was interesting to learn more about the more "serious" movies she did. The writing was a little strange to me, though. Sometimes it felt like she had just recorded herself reminiscing and then a transcriber typed it up. The sex parts, whatever. Other than possibly her first experience with Jack Cassidy, they just felt randomly stuck in there and Overall, I enjoyed the book, learning a lot more about Shirley Jones' life. I basically only know her as Shirley Partridge and from her musicals, so it was interesting to learn more about the more "serious" movies she did. The writing was a little strange to me, though. Sometimes it felt like she had just recorded herself reminiscing and then a transcriber typed it up. The sex parts, whatever. Other than possibly her first experience with Jack Cassidy, they just felt randomly stuck in there and for what reason? I don't know what she felt she had to prove. But it's a quick, entertaining read.

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