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Nothing to Declare: Memoirs of a Woman Traveling Alone

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Traveling from the highland desert of northern Mexico to the steaming jungles of Honduras, from the seashore of the Caribbean to the exquisite highlands of Guatemala, Mary Morris, a celebrated writer of both fiction and nonfiction, confronts the realities of place, poverty, machismo, and selfhood. As she experiences the rawness and precariousness of life in another culture Traveling from the highland desert of northern Mexico to the steaming jungles of Honduras, from the seashore of the Caribbean to the exquisite highlands of Guatemala, Mary Morris, a celebrated writer of both fiction and nonfiction, confronts the realities of place, poverty, machismo, and selfhood. As she experiences the rawness and precariousness of life in another culture, Morris begins to hear echoes of her own life and her own sense of deprivation. And she begins, too, to overcome the struggles of the past that have held her back personally; as in the very best travel writing, Morris effectively explores her own soul while exploring new terrain and new experience. By crossing such boundaries throughout the pages of Nothing to Declare, she sets new frontiers for herself as a woman—and as a writer.


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Traveling from the highland desert of northern Mexico to the steaming jungles of Honduras, from the seashore of the Caribbean to the exquisite highlands of Guatemala, Mary Morris, a celebrated writer of both fiction and nonfiction, confronts the realities of place, poverty, machismo, and selfhood. As she experiences the rawness and precariousness of life in another culture Traveling from the highland desert of northern Mexico to the steaming jungles of Honduras, from the seashore of the Caribbean to the exquisite highlands of Guatemala, Mary Morris, a celebrated writer of both fiction and nonfiction, confronts the realities of place, poverty, machismo, and selfhood. As she experiences the rawness and precariousness of life in another culture, Morris begins to hear echoes of her own life and her own sense of deprivation. And she begins, too, to overcome the struggles of the past that have held her back personally; as in the very best travel writing, Morris effectively explores her own soul while exploring new terrain and new experience. By crossing such boundaries throughout the pages of Nothing to Declare, she sets new frontiers for herself as a woman—and as a writer.

30 review for Nothing to Declare: Memoirs of a Woman Traveling Alone

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I hesitantly give this book 3 stars, because I would really like to give it both 1 star and 4/5 stars. I alternately loved and hated it. Morris is at her best describing what she observes during her travels: the colors, smells, odd but telling details, and the scenery. She is able to evoke the place on the page, which is a rare feat even in travel writing. She doesn't shy away from grime or the grotesque. However, the "memoir" parts of the book, in which she reflects on her character and on her I hesitantly give this book 3 stars, because I would really like to give it both 1 star and 4/5 stars. I alternately loved and hated it. Morris is at her best describing what she observes during her travels: the colors, smells, odd but telling details, and the scenery. She is able to evoke the place on the page, which is a rare feat even in travel writing. She doesn't shy away from grime or the grotesque. However, the "memoir" parts of the book, in which she reflects on her character and on her own life, are irritating, and at times, she seems oblivious to her own privilege (something I'm sure I'm often guilty of as well, which is perhaps why it irritated me so much). Her characterizations of the "natives" she meets are often overly simplistic and even condescending (with the exception of her neighbor Lupe, who is evoked with complexity and compassion, and whose daily struggles bring tears to the eyes). I'm glad that I read this book, even the parts that I didn't enjoy, because I remained fully engaged throughout, and it caused me to learn and reflect.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Oceana2602

    Fair warning: I did not finish this book. And yet, I'm giving it a one star rating. Here's why: "Nothing to declare" is a book about a woman moving to Mexico to write. Although I don't think it is explicitly mentioned, the subtitle "Memoirs of a woman traveling alone" as well as the first person narrator strongly imply that the woman Morris is writing about is Morris herself. At least I had no reason to assume otherwise. Apart from the fact that moving to another country is not traveling (to me - a Fair warning: I did not finish this book. And yet, I'm giving it a one star rating. Here's why: "Nothing to declare" is a book about a woman moving to Mexico to write. Although I don't think it is explicitly mentioned, the subtitle "Memoirs of a woman traveling alone" as well as the first person narrator strongly imply that the woman Morris is writing about is Morris herself. At least I had no reason to assume otherwise. Apart from the fact that moving to another country is not traveling (to me - and I've spent several years living abroad in different countries and I've traveled), there was nothing wrong with the book in the beginning. I was waiting for it to develop into something good or maybe not so good, but it was definitely ok at first. Until I came across this little sentence, almost casually, but completely seriously thrown in little sentence on page 36: "I was bored so I offered to read their palms, something I can do, though I don't like to waste or abuse my powers." I immediately lost any resepct I may have had for Mary Morris and was completely, completel unable to take her or anything she wrote serious. Ever. Again. Please, palmreaders of the world, come and stone me and try to convince me that you really can read palms. PLEASE feel free. Freedom of opinion and everything, you have every right to believe in whatever you want and TELL me about it, since the internet, at least this review here, is kinda a public place. But PLEASE do not expect me not to lean back and die laughing. This is really the BEST and most absurd thing I have ever across in a book - it took me completely by surprise. I still don't know if I should laugh or cry. It's memorable for sure. But reading something by someone who is so obviously a lunatic and does not know it? I can't. Really, I can't.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    A memoir of an American woman in her thirties who uses a writing grant to live in Mexico and travel Central America in the 1980s. It's an interesting account, but I also felt it difficult to connect with the author. I couldn't quite relate to her lifestyle, nor to the many risks she takes. She seems to drift, she forms fleeting bonds with strangers, most of whom she doesn't particularly like. The author is also a novelist, and at times she takes some obvious creative liberties, leaving me wonder A memoir of an American woman in her thirties who uses a writing grant to live in Mexico and travel Central America in the 1980s. It's an interesting account, but I also felt it difficult to connect with the author. I couldn't quite relate to her lifestyle, nor to the many risks she takes. She seems to drift, she forms fleeting bonds with strangers, most of whom she doesn't particularly like. The author is also a novelist, and at times she takes some obvious creative liberties, leaving me wondering where else in the account she took liberties. But then, when it comes to a memoir, it's not an account of what happened, but rather how the author perceived what happened. It seems at this point in her life, Morris was lost. She's constantly lonely, but wants to be unattached. As if she wants the benefit of relationships, but doesn't want to invest herself in them. She is very critical of these people she meets. She can't seem to make meaningful bonds. She has an attitude of superiority, and she keeps track of every wrong or failure toward her. She has a relationship with a local man who falls in love with her, but all along she has no intention of making it a permanent relationship. And he accuses her, accurately I think, of North American superiority. She has one moment of recognizing that her behavior is self-absorbed, but it's fleeting. Most other Americans living there fare no better in her eyes. They all seem to be "writers" and "photographers", people looking to live cheaply. The irony is that while she finds these others lacking, she herself is there on a writing grant. Of course, she is a talented writer, and she gets published. But does success make someone superior, or just make her feel superior? Perhaps the most disturbing moment comes at the end. The author grows very close to a woman named Lupe who lives next door. Lupe does a great deal to help her--she shows her how to live there, she helps her get what she needs, she offers friendship and support and comfort. But Lupe has a hard life she seems to be trapped in. Too many children, never enough money, dependent on a man who treats her poorly. Perhaps that's why Morris, despite their friendship, never thinks of her as equal. They come from different worlds, so this is not the disturbing part. It's when the author returns one last time after a trip to San Miguel, Mexico where she lived to pack up her things and move back to the U.S. There she learns that Maria Elena, Lupe's daughter, just died giving birth to a daughter whom they named Maria--after the author. She has no reaction or comment on this news. There's a scene break, and the author carries on with her life. She doesn't acknowledge the death or her friend's grief outside of the point that they named the baby after her. I don't know if the grief was too private for her to write about. Or perhaps the author thought the news was an attempt to change her mind--Lupe wants to escape a hard and inescapable life and wants to leave with Morris, and bring her children. Morris insists she can't, she wouldn't be happy. So I wonder, was the child named for her mother, also Maria, and telling Mary differently was an attempt to change her mind? Regardless, I found Morris lack of reaction or significant acknowledgment of the death of a woman who she had known well, the daughter of a woman who did so much for her, to be disturbing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    This is an amazing book. Having lived in rural Mexico I was captivated and drawn into Morris's world immediately. But she is such a gifted story teller that you do not need any knowledge of Mexico to be drawn in. You can relate to her loneliness and isolation, along with her sense of adventure, trying to do more than just scratch the surface of this new world. This is probably in my top five of all travel narratives I have read. Don't miss this one!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Campbell

    It's pretty standard, straightforward, anecdotal memoir stuff. A quick, fun read, especially if you have any interest in mesoamerican native history. The story (and the locations she visits) has a certain timelessness to it. Apart from some specific Nicaraguan historical moments she encounters, it could be taking place at virtually any time. Time in impoverished places moves very slowly. Highlight: she did capture well the feeling that travel can be transcendent, drug-like, and that even terrify It's pretty standard, straightforward, anecdotal memoir stuff. A quick, fun read, especially if you have any interest in mesoamerican native history. The story (and the locations she visits) has a certain timelessness to it. Apart from some specific Nicaraguan historical moments she encounters, it could be taking place at virtually any time. Time in impoverished places moves very slowly. Highlight: she did capture well the feeling that travel can be transcendent, drug-like, and that even terrifying situations (or maybe especially terrifying situations?) are what make experiencing new places so addictive. The best travel stories are ALWAYS built on calamities. As pleasant as it may be to experience it, it's not interesting to hear about that week you spent lying on a beach chair with a cocktail. "I wanted to keep going forever, to never stop...it was like a drug in me. As a traveler I can achieve a kind of high, a somewhat altered state of consciousness. I think it must be what athletes feel." Otherwise, I was disappointed that I didn't LIKE Mary. She takes advantage of people, is cold, detached, and selfish. Despite the fact that she goes out of her way to mention every time she gives things away, she seems to think much more highly of her own generosity than is probably necessary. She fancies herself a psychic of sorts, clearly straying from reality a time or two.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Sometimes I think I want to travel the world. I’ve always felt like a bit (okay, a lot) of a homebody, but there may actually be some wanderlust in my little hermit heart. The way Morris describes the vast Mexican desert and the ferocious jungles of South America makes my heart ache for wild spaces and beautiful adventure. Nothing to Declare paints a picture of a woman finding herself as she explores the world. She moves in and out of relationship with land and with people in the most incredible Sometimes I think I want to travel the world. I’ve always felt like a bit (okay, a lot) of a homebody, but there may actually be some wanderlust in my little hermit heart. The way Morris describes the vast Mexican desert and the ferocious jungles of South America makes my heart ache for wild spaces and beautiful adventure. Nothing to Declare paints a picture of a woman finding herself as she explores the world. She moves in and out of relationship with land and with people in the most incredible, honest way, all the while becoming more aware of who she is and what she needs in life. She seems to find that she, like all human creatures, is a walking contradiction and that even once she’s decided who she is, her mind and heart are capable of both drastic and subtle, step-by-step change. In her memoirs, Morris is simultaneously vulnerable and indestructible, avoidant and confrontational, helplessly lost and forever at home. Gorgeous from cover to cover.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I had to read this one back in college for a women's lit class. We spent the semester focusing on memoir/travel writers, and this was definitely a stand out. Mary Morris is a participator, not simply an observer. She unveils the true gritty, poignant and complicated lives of the inhabitants of San Miguel, Mexico, as she attempts to come to grips with her own personal demons and disappointments. In the course of her stay, she re-discovers her identity and personal strength. I absolutely loved Mor I had to read this one back in college for a women's lit class. We spent the semester focusing on memoir/travel writers, and this was definitely a stand out. Mary Morris is a participator, not simply an observer. She unveils the true gritty, poignant and complicated lives of the inhabitants of San Miguel, Mexico, as she attempts to come to grips with her own personal demons and disappointments. In the course of her stay, she re-discovers her identity and personal strength. I absolutely loved Morris's direct, simple, yet beautiful imagery. And this is the kind of traveling I would love to do, but would need 30 lifetimes to accomplish. Spending months or years in a town getting to know what it's truly like to live there and be part of its unique community. Sigh....

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    It's 2018 and this book has not aged well. There was very little traveling all things considered and I find the undertone of racism and elitism is deeply unpleasant. It's like an ode to poorly executed travel plans by a financially well-off person but with lines like the one about how the Mexicans who came out to the fountains / plazas with their family are often fat and splashing around happily and how she wishes she knows how to be that carefree. (This was literally within the first 50 pages.) It's 2018 and this book has not aged well. There was very little traveling all things considered and I find the undertone of racism and elitism is deeply unpleasant. It's like an ode to poorly executed travel plans by a financially well-off person but with lines like the one about how the Mexicans who came out to the fountains / plazas with their family are often fat and splashing around happily and how she wishes she knows how to be that carefree. (This was literally within the first 50 pages.) I could see how this book could be considered exotic / trail blazing for the time when it was first written but for 2018? Not great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Parmeter

    Very strong first-person narrative of a woman traveling and living in Mexico in times when this was not so common. Beautiful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nina Levison

    This book had a nice dreamlike flow that followed the transience of travel and made for an easy read, but Morris was really an unlikeable character. The bits and pieces about Mayan and Aztec culture were interesting and inspired further research on my end, but seemed like afterthought and were largely drowned out by vain, despairing and somewhat boring self-reflections. She witnessed and experienced some really moving things and there was no processing of any of it. She would just write it matte This book had a nice dreamlike flow that followed the transience of travel and made for an easy read, but Morris was really an unlikeable character. The bits and pieces about Mayan and Aztec culture were interesting and inspired further research on my end, but seemed like afterthought and were largely drowned out by vain, despairing and somewhat boring self-reflections. She witnessed and experienced some really moving things and there was no processing of any of it. She would just write it matter-of-factly and move on. Her experimentation with magical realism fell short. This is the story of a woman paid to write a book and so lived cheaply in Mexico with some travel here and there, logged her experience and published it. Someone please get me this gig! There was nothing to declare, as promised in the title.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I was excited when I realized that this author had lived and written in San Miguel; thus, I thought it would be filled with stories of the wonderful, quirky, adventuresome, warm, curious, artistic people, both Mexicans and ex-pats, who live and work in this part of Mexico. , Ms Morris shared my love of the beauty of this semi-desert mountainous terrain with it's other-worldly light. But where were all the wonderful characters I was expecting? Ms Morris makes friends with her neighbour, an extrem I was excited when I realized that this author had lived and written in San Miguel; thus, I thought it would be filled with stories of the wonderful, quirky, adventuresome, warm, curious, artistic people, both Mexicans and ex-pats, who live and work in this part of Mexico. , Ms Morris shared my love of the beauty of this semi-desert mountainous terrain with it's other-worldly light. But where were all the wonderful characters I was expecting? Ms Morris makes friends with her neighbour, an extremely poor woman with many children and a wandering spouse but she seems pretty disdainful of everyone else she meets. Her lover seems like a sweet gentle man but it is apparent from the start that she is going to leave him. Mexico City is one of the most vibrant cities in the world yet she leaves us feeling that it is nothing but a dreary apartment holding her hostage and keeping her from returning to Her life in San Miguel. . She describes her travels in South American countries mostly by the inconsequential people that she meets. She definitely leaves the impression that travelling is dreary and difficult and leaves us wondering why she does it. Mary Morris describes herself as a woman very in tune with the "ghost" world - San Miguel is full of stories of ghostly presences yet the ones described by the author are unconvincing. All in all, the overall feeling in this book is one of sadness. Yet, the writing was often lovely. I know Mary Morris has written many other books and keeps up a blog; her writing interests me enough to check out her blog to see if she has moved on to find joy in her life and her travels

  12. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    A great travelogue, Something to Declare coverts Mary Morris' travels in Central America in the 80s. It was written soon after that (published in 88) which made me wish I had a copy with a new afterword for a little more perspective (not sure such a thing exists). In general I liked the book, enjoyed reading about her adventures, but disliked about half of the spiritual stuff and musings on her personal life. I liked the other half, though. It was interesting to read about someone who hated bein A great travelogue, Something to Declare coverts Mary Morris' travels in Central America in the 80s. It was written soon after that (published in 88) which made me wish I had a copy with a new afterword for a little more perspective (not sure such a thing exists). In general I liked the book, enjoyed reading about her adventures, but disliked about half of the spiritual stuff and musings on her personal life. I liked the other half, though. It was interesting to read about someone who hated being alone and who was in fact for most of the book with other people - especially as I had picked up the book because I specifically wanted to read about women traveling alone. Even when Morris was traveling alone, she quickly made friends with people she met, so her experiences of real solitude seem to be restricted to finding herself feel in a jungle one afternoon and a few other short specific times. It was interesting also to read about her relationship issues and how she had a hard time with men. I was not expecting to find that in this book. It also contributed to my wanting a little more perspective, as the flap says she lives with her husband and daughter, but the book ends with her being about to leave Mexico. It reminds me of how Wild gives us a little fast forward which helps with the conclusion. I wanted to know more about how Morris changed as a result of her travels and how she overcame her relationship issues.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Suraj Alva

    One reader commented that Morris is the most "self-honest" person he knows. And I gotta concur. I've never read any woman author like her. She is on par with the other great travel writer I've read extensively: V.S. Naipaul. The only difference is: She privatizes space--colonizes it for her own personal purposes, connecting it to herstory--whereas he analyzes space to discover mankind's relation to it. I can almost imagine the Nobel Committee saying of her "...for her personalization of space, h One reader commented that Morris is the most "self-honest" person he knows. And I gotta concur. I've never read any woman author like her. She is on par with the other great travel writer I've read extensively: V.S. Naipaul. The only difference is: She privatizes space--colonizes it for her own personal purposes, connecting it to herstory--whereas he analyzes space to discover mankind's relation to it. I can almost imagine the Nobel Committee saying of her "...for her personalization of space, her..." I am baffled Morris is so little known. I came across her through a story she published in the VQR. Could be her agent--her website contains numerous typos, fragmentary, redundant sentences--so I am inclined to think he/she has not marketed Morris well enough. Regardless, an amazing book without an agenda. Just a simple story of a woman's search for her place in this world.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Price

    I read this book at a moment when I was in mourning for another book, with a head full of thoughts I was processing. I was in transition and Mary Morris' book capture this state of transition perfectly. She wanders through Mexico finding the questions she needs to ask, resisting answering a number of them, and attempting to make a relationship with the landscape and people she meets, but never really achieving any depth of connection. Morris was a perfect companion; she asked little of me, she w I read this book at a moment when I was in mourning for another book, with a head full of thoughts I was processing. I was in transition and Mary Morris' book capture this state of transition perfectly. She wanders through Mexico finding the questions she needs to ask, resisting answering a number of them, and attempting to make a relationship with the landscape and people she meets, but never really achieving any depth of connection. Morris was a perfect companion; she asked little of me, she was entertaining and she took me to places I now long to visit - we were tourists together, but never anything deeper.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    A great travel book about one woman's travels through Latin America. She shows you the raw real side of living and traveling in Latin America. No fluffed up sugar coated stuff here. At times through out the book I was thinking to myself I can't believe she just did that she must have a death wish, she is crazy. And other times in the book I could really relate to some of her situations and it touched me way deep down inside. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes to travel.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    Really fun read. I was hoping to be inspired to travel in Mexico and Central America. Mexico, a bit, but Morris writes of Central America in the late 1970's early 1980's - an interesting time to be traveling. Her run-in with a revolutionary subcomandante was particularly riveting. Would like to read some of her fiction now.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laurab

    I read this book while travelling in Mexico this last December, and it was the perfect travel companion: insightful, introspective, at times funny and often profound.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dogsandbooks

    Donated to DPL October 2015

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Speaking

    Review from my blog post "4 TRAVEL BOOKS FOR YOUR SUMMER (2017)" In the 1980s, Morris leaves New York, her life and its ghosts, and ends up in San Miguel, Mexico, near the US border, with a writing grant. The book is about her temporary life there, her trips around Central America and the people she met on the way. In 2016, I held my copy, standing in a second-hand bookshop in Whitehorse, Yukon. I clenched my teeth, as I felt negative anticipation. Under the title, I could read "Memoirs of a woman Review from my blog post "4 TRAVEL BOOKS FOR YOUR SUMMER (2017)" In the 1980s, Morris leaves New York, her life and its ghosts, and ends up in San Miguel, Mexico, near the US border, with a writing grant. The book is about her temporary life there, her trips around Central America and the people she met on the way. In 2016, I held my copy, standing in a second-hand bookshop in Whitehorse, Yukon. I clenched my teeth, as I felt negative anticipation. Under the title, I could read "Memoirs of a woman traveling alone". This badly sounded like a book in which a privileged white American woman seeks adventure in an exotic country, conveniently cheap and located nextdoor to her home country. But I gave the book a chance. And what I found in its pages, is nothing short of spectacular writing. Nothing To Declare is raw sensations. It is unfiltered subjectivity, which makes it unique, precious. However, this also made it very irritating to a substantial amount of readers. Morris weaves her travel experience into a narrative. She writes about events and people exactly as she felt about them, unapologetically, and sometimes in an ethereal, dreamlike, "detached" manner that reflects her personal style of writing — but that may have been interpreted as insensitivity. On the other hand, Morris develops a special relationship with her neighbor Lupe. Thoughout the book, it is clear they both know of the cultural and social gap that exists between them. And yet, their "womanness" binds them together, resulting in reflections on what it is to be a woman: a woman lost, a woman found, a woman traveling alone out of her privileged comfort zone. I truly loved this book for its literary qualities, its "indirect feminism", and the deep love of traveling it conveys. I thought it was beautiful travel writing, and I didn't find it insensitive at all. I thought it was straightforward, honest, reckless, and personal. Morris is traveling for herself, to find herself, to write for herself. The fact that she is a woman may have fed different "expectations" in the audience. Maybe did we expect more modesty, caution, and motherly care? Well, tough luck. Carrie Speaking, Travel Writer, Blogger. http://carriespeaking.com

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maya Michel

    It's been a long time since I read this book which means that it must have hit a nerve. What I recall was my own memories of travelling through Mexico and Guatemala in the 70s. I remember how her comments brought back poignant memories but where she was focusing on the dirt and the noise, I recalled the beauty and kindness. It was wonderful to read about a place I have fallen in love with written in terms and towns that I had found amusement and grace. So, I guess I loved it but more than that I It's been a long time since I read this book which means that it must have hit a nerve. What I recall was my own memories of travelling through Mexico and Guatemala in the 70s. I remember how her comments brought back poignant memories but where she was focusing on the dirt and the noise, I recalled the beauty and kindness. It was wonderful to read about a place I have fallen in love with written in terms and towns that I had found amusement and grace. So, I guess I loved it but more than that I loved the memories that it evokes. She's a bit more of a pessimist than I but I'm used to that. Which is why I gave it five stars because it reminded me of near perfection.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    I really hoped to enjoy this book, and did give it a chance. It got worse as it went along, and eventually became downright boring ,depressing, and repetitive. No new insights to share , with all the poverty crime and filth as she goes traveling. Perhaps " Nothing meaningful to declare " should have been the title.. A bit of the history was interesting . It had glimmers of promise at points , but did not deliver.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Debby

    I liked the way she told her travel .But there was something behind my mind all the time reading this book,"This is very American ".That is I could not empathise with her and her actions. There are things in travelling alone as a woman that gives a strange courage to do things that we would not do back home .Coming back alive and with the will to live is a positive outcome of this travel inwards to dangerous zones .

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Burton

    I read this book because I had recently visited San Miguel de Allende and was interested in reading how others experienced and felt about SMA. Sadly, I read it cover to cover but I couldn’t relate to the author, or her experiences which, for the most part, sounded horrible and left me wondering if there was any joy in her life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cherryls Books

    Morris connects with the reader very early on in the book, she talks about her thoughts, feelings and her life - weaving it through her day to day travel experiences, with characters that we grow to know and understand. I definitely felt like I'd been on a journey with her, and gained fresh insights into life in Mexico.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Mozayani

    Interesting travel log and memoir of a woman who ventured to Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua alone in the 80s. Quite remarkable accounts of the landscapes, ruins and people in these parts. I wonder what happened to Lupe and her children.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda Cousens

    A rare travel book. I was captivated by her descriptions of the places the author visited, the people she met, and the many hardships she endured along the way. Highly recommended to travellers and armchair travellers alike!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    Not my favorite travelogue, probably mostly because it was written so long ago (the 80's) and travel has changed to much since.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Loved this book! I will admit it is probably not for everyone, not sure if I would recommend it, but I really enjoyed it. Morris's descriptions of her travels can really take you away. Although her experiences were not shy of the fear that comes from traveling (especially as a woman) she draws the reader in with beautiful imagery of each location as well as an entertaining story and personal relationships with locals and tourists. I recently was in Mexico on vacation (there's not much to compare Loved this book! I will admit it is probably not for everyone, not sure if I would recommend it, but I really enjoyed it. Morris's descriptions of her travels can really take you away. Although her experiences were not shy of the fear that comes from traveling (especially as a woman) she draws the reader in with beautiful imagery of each location as well as an entertaining story and personal relationships with locals and tourists. I recently was in Mexico on vacation (there's not much to compare except for the heat) which made this book speak more to me than if I read it at a different time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kea

    This book will make you want to travel. Loved how she detailed her experiences alone and how she got the courage to do it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Billy

    The joy of whining!

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