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„Atminimų spalva” – tai lyg atminty iškilusių akimirkų, kiek išblukusių momentinių fotografijų rinkinys, menantis tarsi nerūpestingą jaunuolių gyvenimą devintojo dešimtmečio Pietų Londone, Brikstone. Jie dykinėja po Londoną, klausosi džiazo ir klasikos, geria alų ir rūko žolę; jų kasdienybės monotoniją ardo nuotykiai. Romano veikėjai susikūrę savą, spalvingą, virš londonie „Atminimų spalva” – tai lyg atminty iškilusių akimirkų, kiek išblukusių momentinių fotografijų rinkinys, menantis tarsi nerūpestingą jaunuolių gyvenimą devintojo dešimtmečio Pietų Londone, Brikstone. Jie dykinėja po Londoną, klausosi džiazo ir klasikos, geria alų ir rūko žolę; jų kasdienybės monotoniją ardo nuotykiai. Romano veikėjai susikūrę savą, spalvingą, virš londonietiško nuobodulio pakylėtą pasaulį – įspūdingiausios akimirkos ištinka juos ant daugiabučio namo stogo, po mėlynu dangumi. Tai – knyga apie draugystę ir vienatvę, apie jaunų žmonių bandymus įprasminti gyvenimą, kasdienybę, nepasiduoti masės nuomonei, vartotojiškumui. Jiems lyg ir nepavyksta įsikurti, susirasti darbą ir namus, tačiau tai tampa ir savotišku jų protestu. Ši knyga – apie sugebėjimą sugerti ir išlaikyti atminty gyvus jau seniai praeitin nugrimzdusius išgyvenimus, visiems laikams išėjusius draugus ir išblėsusius jausmus.


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„Atminimų spalva” – tai lyg atminty iškilusių akimirkų, kiek išblukusių momentinių fotografijų rinkinys, menantis tarsi nerūpestingą jaunuolių gyvenimą devintojo dešimtmečio Pietų Londone, Brikstone. Jie dykinėja po Londoną, klausosi džiazo ir klasikos, geria alų ir rūko žolę; jų kasdienybės monotoniją ardo nuotykiai. Romano veikėjai susikūrę savą, spalvingą, virš londonie „Atminimų spalva” – tai lyg atminty iškilusių akimirkų, kiek išblukusių momentinių fotografijų rinkinys, menantis tarsi nerūpestingą jaunuolių gyvenimą devintojo dešimtmečio Pietų Londone, Brikstone. Jie dykinėja po Londoną, klausosi džiazo ir klasikos, geria alų ir rūko žolę; jų kasdienybės monotoniją ardo nuotykiai. Romano veikėjai susikūrę savą, spalvingą, virš londonietiško nuobodulio pakylėtą pasaulį – įspūdingiausios akimirkos ištinka juos ant daugiabučio namo stogo, po mėlynu dangumi. Tai – knyga apie draugystę ir vienatvę, apie jaunų žmonių bandymus įprasminti gyvenimą, kasdienybę, nepasiduoti masės nuomonei, vartotojiškumui. Jiems lyg ir nepavyksta įsikurti, susirasti darbą ir namus, tačiau tai tampa ir savotišku jų protestu. Ši knyga – apie sugebėjimą sugerti ir išlaikyti atminty gyvus jau seniai praeitin nugrimzdusius išgyvenimus, visiems laikams išėjusius draugus ir išblėsusius jausmus.

30 review for Atminimų spalva

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    This was my third Geoff Dyer novel and it sits right in the middle: better than 'Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi' but not as good as 'Paris Trance'. Take away the heroin, throw in Sexual undercurrents, and switch from Edinburgh to south London, then I'd say it shares the same energetic vibe as Trainspotting. There are also nods towards Martin Amis too. The Colour of Memory centres on the a nameless narrator who works dead-end marketing jobs, and his group of slacker close friends as they face This was my third Geoff Dyer novel and it sits right in the middle: better than 'Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi' but not as good as 'Paris Trance'. Take away the heroin, throw in Sexual undercurrents, and switch from Edinburgh to south London, then I'd say it shares the same energetic vibe as Trainspotting. There are also nods towards Martin Amis too. The Colour of Memory centres on the a nameless narrator who works dead-end marketing jobs, and his group of slacker close friends as they face the many ups and downs of living as part of the lost generation in 80s Britain. There is lots of drinking and smoking dope, whilst trying to avoid work as much as possible. One is a writer who can't be bothered to write much, and another is an insomniac obsessed with cleanliness. And of course we get the love interest. Dyer through sharp insights portraits the simple pleasures of friendship really well, and will no doubt spark memories for the British reader who lived out their 20s in the 80s. For me it was the mid 90s/early 00s, but it certainly made the colour of my own memories come flooding back. I could see my former self in there somewhere, especially when it came to crashing out drunk on a mate's sofa, and also falling for the same girl. Where did it all go? It only seems like yesterday. I really felt the nostalgia washing over me. It's certainly one of the best novels I've read in recent years on friendship.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edita

    That is probably the most painful part: when you are still tormented by the thought that one last effort of will might improve things. * Each loss bothered me a little less than the previous one. [...] ‘I’m becoming immune to catastrophe,’ I said. * The words broke over me. I stared into the dark sky above and around us. The night remembered the voice. The night remembered how the voice had needed the night. * The wind howled as if it longed for the coarse grass of the moor. * This book is like an album That is probably the most painful part: when you are still tormented by the thought that one last effort of will might improve things. * Each loss bothered me a little less than the previous one. [...] ‘I’m becoming immune to catastrophe,’ I said. * The words broke over me. I stared into the dark sky above and around us. The night remembered the voice. The night remembered how the voice had needed the night. * The wind howled as if it longed for the coarse grass of the moor. * This book is like an album of snaps. In any snap strangers intrude; the prints preserve an intimacy that lasted only for a fraction of a second as someone, unnoticed at the time, strayed unintentionally into the picture frame. Hidden among the familiar, laughing faces of friends are the glimpsed shapes of strangers; and in the distant homes of tourists there you are, at the edge of the frame, slightly out of focus, in the midst of other peoples’ memories. We stray into each other’s lives. In the course of any day in any city it happens thousands of times and every now and again it is caught on film. That is what is happening here. Look closely and maybe there, close to the margin of the page, you will find the hurried glance of your own image: [...]

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brian Grover

    This was an impulse buy made while strolling past McNally Jackson one night, but I'm extremely happy to have made it. It's essentially a book with no plot, just 60 short chapters strung together that piece out a year in the life of a group of 20-something friends in the London suburb of Brixton in the late '80s. They're a group of would-be artists and layabouts who have little ambition beyond scraping out a living and enjoying each others' company, which sounds like it could be insufferable. It' This was an impulse buy made while strolling past McNally Jackson one night, but I'm extremely happy to have made it. It's essentially a book with no plot, just 60 short chapters strung together that piece out a year in the life of a group of 20-something friends in the London suburb of Brixton in the late '80s. They're a group of would-be artists and layabouts who have little ambition beyond scraping out a living and enjoying each others' company, which sounds like it could be insufferable. It's not. The characters are a sharply drawn bunch - smart, funny, and good-hearted. And the writing is dynamite. Beautiful and spare, it creates an idyllic snapshot of youth that made me long for days gone by. Since I finished it, I've gone back and picked it up a few times and re-read random passages, and no doubt I'll read it cover to cover again soon. Incidentally, if anyone reading this review has read the book, can we talk about the postscript ending? I need closure on this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This book without a plot (as acknowledged by the author himself) still tells a great story, in the same way a picture can tell a story. It's more a series of vignettes, each pretty much stands alone but they are woven together to form a year-in-the-life tale of young drifting Londoners in the 1980s. A lot of subtleties in how the characters are developed, nothing in your face. The more I think about this book the more I like it. This book without a plot (as acknowledged by the author himself) still tells a great story, in the same way a picture can tell a story. It's more a series of vignettes, each pretty much stands alone but they are woven together to form a year-in-the-life tale of young drifting Londoners in the 1980s. A lot of subtleties in how the characters are developed, nothing in your face. The more I think about this book the more I like it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Landau

    Sometimes the characters let you know what’s going on in THE COLOUR OF MEMORY by Geoff Dyer, like when one, a writer, explains that he never applies plot. Plot kills. This first novel kills, but not mortally, and, of course, it’s plotless. The other way Dyer pops into the narrative is by an aside, slipping next to you and whispering in your ear, such as when he explains that memory, like this book, is more a collection of snapshots that capture not only a moment of your time and place, but those Sometimes the characters let you know what’s going on in THE COLOUR OF MEMORY by Geoff Dyer, like when one, a writer, explains that he never applies plot. Plot kills. This first novel kills, but not mortally, and, of course, it’s plotless. The other way Dyer pops into the narrative is by an aside, slipping next to you and whispering in your ear, such as when he explains that memory, like this book, is more a collection of snapshots that capture not only a moment of your time and place, but those extras that have wandered into the picture when the shutter opened. These disjointed pictures, connected by a half-dozen recurring characters, develop into a place and time that feels real because it reflects a place and time we’ve all lived through, young adulthood. If your youth was aimlessly spent in pursuit of unambitiousness and leisure then this will ring true to you as well. Dyer likely lived through this, for, as he also notes in the book (or was it the introduction?), for him fiction is an inch away from the truth. It’s in that inch that this book lives. And like the young, the book is very funny, not that all kids are humorous. No, most are too earnest for that. But these kids without interest in prospects lay claim to a dry, straight-faced jokiness that makes hanging out with them fun. Dyer writes in the introduction (this time I’m sure) that he did a little editing for this American reissue, deleting a joke he stole from a friend, who he later discovered stole it from Woody Allen. I wished he kept it in. It’s important to have shared memories. If you didn’t have a wayward past, a nonlinear excursion en route to adulthood, then by all means take his.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kholofelo

    Disappointing. If a book is called a novel and is without a plot, then there must be something special in between its pages to keep you reading. This one has no plot and has nothing special about it, apart from the rumours you've heard about the apparently wonderful author of it- which leaves you with even more disappointment because of the great expectation. However, there are some really good snapshots of life as we know it, that make you slightly nostalgic and urge you forward through each pag Disappointing. If a book is called a novel and is without a plot, then there must be something special in between its pages to keep you reading. This one has no plot and has nothing special about it, apart from the rumours you've heard about the apparently wonderful author of it- which leaves you with even more disappointment because of the great expectation. However, there are some really good snapshots of life as we know it, that make you slightly nostalgic and urge you forward through each page. But all in all, I wouldn't recommend it. Find yourself something more interesting to read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madhuri

    Reading this book felt like listening to jazz. It swept me with a deep nostalgia for someone else's memories. It is a collection of Imagery and descriptions. And those odd thoughts which fill the mind but don't often come on paper. Reading this book felt like listening to jazz. It swept me with a deep nostalgia for someone else's memories. It is a collection of Imagery and descriptions. And those odd thoughts which fill the mind but don't often come on paper.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I just love this book. I've read it so many times I just love this book. I've read it so many times

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oryx

    This book oozes England. I think it may be one of my favourites. I am completely in awe. I have no other words. It was beautiful. 4.17

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Allen

    A warm, funny debut novel that follows a group of friends, all smart, around age 20 and underemployed by choice in late 1980s England. They hang out, drink beer, listen to "Sketches of Spain" and try to avoid getting burgled. There's no plot, but plot is overrated, right? Often very funny, it's also lyrical and elegiac for a time and circumstance the narrator understands needs to be remembered before it fades. A warm, funny debut novel that follows a group of friends, all smart, around age 20 and underemployed by choice in late 1980s England. They hang out, drink beer, listen to "Sketches of Spain" and try to avoid getting burgled. There's no plot, but plot is overrated, right? Often very funny, it's also lyrical and elegiac for a time and circumstance the narrator understands needs to be remembered before it fades.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I became a fan of Geoff Dyer's writing style a couple if years ago and am making my way through his books. His style is clear and honest, opposite of pretentious, and he works very hard to make it feel fresh, sensitive, funny all at different moments. This first novel set in 1980s Brixton section of London is all those things and it was a pleasure to find it in the U.S. I became a fan of Geoff Dyer's writing style a couple if years ago and am making my way through his books. His style is clear and honest, opposite of pretentious, and he works very hard to make it feel fresh, sensitive, funny all at different moments. This first novel set in 1980s Brixton section of London is all those things and it was a pleasure to find it in the U.S.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ahana Maitra

    Geoff Dyer's The Colour of Memory is the perfect book for rainy afternoons. There is no plot, which seems slightly off-putting at first; but the almost musical quality of Dyer's prose more than makes up for it. I was unsure about this one at first, but it left me with a most pleasant, warm and fuzzy feeling. Geoff Dyer's The Colour of Memory is the perfect book for rainy afternoons. There is no plot, which seems slightly off-putting at first; but the almost musical quality of Dyer's prose more than makes up for it. I was unsure about this one at first, but it left me with a most pleasant, warm and fuzzy feeling.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joe Vess

    As noted above, this is my all-time favorite book. I like everything about it; the unconventional style, the language, the stories, the world it creates and the situations it evokes. Every time I read it I get more out of it. Recommended for everyone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shayla

    Yet again I deeply enjoyed a book where not much actually happens! I read this one because months and months ago I did a google search for books like A Little Life and this one was suggested. I can definitely see why. I had made the search because I wanted another book that would rip my heart out as much as that one did, but what I didn't realize was that I also wanted another taste of the friendship in A Little Life. The Colour of Memory isn't sad at all really, but at the core of it is a group Yet again I deeply enjoyed a book where not much actually happens! I read this one because months and months ago I did a google search for books like A Little Life and this one was suggested. I can definitely see why. I had made the search because I wanted another book that would rip my heart out as much as that one did, but what I didn't realize was that I also wanted another taste of the friendship in A Little Life. The Colour of Memory isn't sad at all really, but at the core of it is a group of friends-- a group of 4 witty, spontaneous, intellectual, artistic, lazy, epicurean, broke, aimless 20-somethings. They're just so fun and interesting to hang out with that I couldn't feel bored at any point. Every chapter is just a snapshot of their lives together in Brixton in the 80's. They go to bars, parties, the pool, each other's houses. They have jobs, on and off, but mainly they just enjoy each other's company and get high/drunk. It's a really sweet book, and I saw a lot of myself woven throughout it. It just had this really earnest, unpretentious quality that I loved. So many achingly tender descriptions, so much humanity. *chef's kiss* I don't have anything smart to say about this book (do I ever, about any book?). Mostly it was just something that felt written for me. I want a group of cool artistic friends who will hang out on the roof of my apartment building, reading and talking while I paint at an easel on the most beautiful summer evening. It was a very indulgent read. Plus there were tons of black people in this book, which was surprising and awesome.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    This is a deceptively simple tale of life among a group of 20-somethings in 1980s Brixton, UK. I got to the end and had to sit back with closed eyes and embrace my own post-college experiences up and down the Northeast Corridor here in the States during those very same years. Friends, moments of joy, strange encounters, dead-end jobs, vivid colors of brick row houses, faded wooden roof decks, and early evening skies. The sounds of a softball game three blocks away, the shouts of the South Philly This is a deceptively simple tale of life among a group of 20-somethings in 1980s Brixton, UK. I got to the end and had to sit back with closed eyes and embrace my own post-college experiences up and down the Northeast Corridor here in the States during those very same years. Friends, moments of joy, strange encounters, dead-end jobs, vivid colors of brick row houses, faded wooden roof decks, and early evening skies. The sounds of a softball game three blocks away, the shouts of the South Philly amateur leaguers, the light traffic-hush along Lombard and South Streets, and the chikk-a of another can of Piels or Yuengling soon to be drained. Roxy Music's "Avalon" or Lou Reed's "New York" -- depending on the mood or whether we were heading out or just returning from our neighborhood watering holes. This book has provoked a surprising level of introspection and regard for my own past ... and my fondest friendships.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    I picked up this book because I’m a big fan of Dyer’s other work. I would say this is probably the worst of what I’ve read from him. However, he does warn you that there is no plot. Instead it is just a time capsule of his youth. While not the best read, if you’re a fan of Dyer it’s worth the read. The prose is charming and the memories are sweet. Since there is nothing to follow you can breeze through it fairly quickly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gintarė

    There was first, but totally failed, my knowlegde with Geoff Dyer. I choose book, because her name was siund interesting. I expected something from life, however nothing similar I don't get. I can't said one thing, which I didn't like. There was everything: writing style, words, storyline. Everything. That's why I didn't finished "The Colour Of Memory". There was first, but totally failed, my knowlegde with Geoff Dyer. I choose book, because her name was siund interesting. I expected something from life, however nothing similar I don't get. I can't said one thing, which I didn't like. There was everything: writing style, words, storyline. Everything. That's why I didn't finished "The Colour Of Memory".

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    2000 notebook: Celebration of being young and having friends and living in Brixton in the early '90s. 2000 notebook: Celebration of being young and having friends and living in Brixton in the early '90s.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Reveiws by Madeline

    The characters are easy to relate to.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marisela

    Difficult to put down.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kesha

    I went with it for the ride and an exciting ride it was.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saul

    We are biased, we all are. We want to find familiarity even in adventures and the very act of providing a review, as we can all see from other people's reviews on the books we know, is based on how much the writer was able to ‘strike a chord' within us. So, my review of “The Colour of Memory” is pretty far removed from being objective. I adore this book so much that I wish I wrote myself (yes, that much) and the reason is that I lived that life in that historical period (not in London but in a l We are biased, we all are. We want to find familiarity even in adventures and the very act of providing a review, as we can all see from other people's reviews on the books we know, is based on how much the writer was able to ‘strike a chord' within us. So, my review of “The Colour of Memory” is pretty far removed from being objective. I adore this book so much that I wish I wrote myself (yes, that much) and the reason is that I lived that life in that historical period (not in London but in a large UK town). I could be any of the characters, living in a cheap flat at the edge of a really happening place at a time where petty crime, alcohol-induced violence and was just part of the backdrop of my youth. That said, the one aspect of the book that is impartially excellent is the quality of the writing; Dyer’s masterly skill intertwines narrative, description, reflection and poetry in equal measures with the timely flow that only the very bests possess. Having read this novel several time I can quite easily assure that there isn’t a single sentence or even word that should be edited. The story unfolds with such deep simplicity that one feels true envy towards Dyer’s talent; he is capable of narrating self-imposed unemployment and hardship without the clichés of self-indulgence or false camaraderie of the Danny Boyle movies. He depicts his 20-something characters as precursors of the urban hipsters who are fully aware of their middle-class roots but who choose to ‘play life' in Brixton with no delusional prospects of playing ‘happy community’ or fake integration. The relation that Dyer creates between the context and the inner thoughts of the narrator poetically denounces the alienation of city life against the individuals that inhabit it. Brixton is not different from any inner city areas then or now, a place that had lost his purpose sometime in post-industrial Britain but that hadn't yet received the spillover of young trendies to be considered ‘desirable' by the estate agents. Throughout the story, the friends are a close circle in a city that is visibly distant from their needs and dreams. Within the rather stale lives the characters appear to lead – they would seem downright inconceivable in the age of smartphones, chain cafés and online dating – there is a palpable sense of dignity, excitement and even hope. The lifestyle that, for many, characterised the last few decades of the last century, being poor was sometimes a choice and, more importantly, acceptable. To sum up, this is a superlative novel that contains the true essence of what it was like to be 20 in the UK in the late 80s/early 90s, presented in exquisite writing style. I don’t think I’ve read anywhere near as good as this since I first bought the book 15 years ago.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    "This would have been a quick read except I got distracted by a massive biography of Hitler and housecleaning in anticipation of some new furniture. "While cleaning I found dust and dirt in every possible place. I eventually decided it was too much trouble and went to the grocery store, where I ran into Bobby, who was standing in front of the broccoli bin, scribbling on a legal pad." That's a weak parody of what "The Colour of Memory" is like. Anecdotal, cryptic, occasionally funny, deadpan, point "This would have been a quick read except I got distracted by a massive biography of Hitler and housecleaning in anticipation of some new furniture. "While cleaning I found dust and dirt in every possible place. I eventually decided it was too much trouble and went to the grocery store, where I ran into Bobby, who was standing in front of the broccoli bin, scribbling on a legal pad." That's a weak parody of what "The Colour of Memory" is like. Anecdotal, cryptic, occasionally funny, deadpan, pointless. Like Jack Kerouac's "The Subterraneans" with fewer pretensions and better punctuation. Every so often a chunk of prose gets serious or lyrical or something, but after further review we're back to cryptic and anecdotal. My friend wrote the non-adventures of this group of aimless young Brits reminded him of our post-collegiate days in the same time frame. I can see that, up to a point. I'm not sure I needed to be reminded of it, though. Dyer has a nice deadpan style, and I will take a look at his other stuff.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emmy

    I picked up The Colour of Memory after seeing it on a "Recommended" shelf at one of the libraries I frequent. I liked the cover design and the praise for its British author, Geoff Dyer, and the fact it was about twentysomething friends in 1980s south London. And then I started reading it, and it was just not what I was expecting at all. I don't mind books with no plots, but the characters need to be memorable enough to capture your attention, and I got to the end not feeling like I fully knew an I picked up The Colour of Memory after seeing it on a "Recommended" shelf at one of the libraries I frequent. I liked the cover design and the praise for its British author, Geoff Dyer, and the fact it was about twentysomething friends in 1980s south London. And then I started reading it, and it was just not what I was expecting at all. I don't mind books with no plots, but the characters need to be memorable enough to capture your attention, and I got to the end not feeling like I fully knew any of them, especially our narrator (who seems to function like the "unreliable narrator" of Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway). Dyer's writing can be quite vivid and beautiful at times; the prose is more lyrical than say that of Salinger's in Catcher in the Rye. And in both The Colour of Memory and Catcher in the Rye, both authors have an innate sense of humor. But I found myself wishing Dyer's narrator was more like Holden Caulfield: a little more narcissistic in his observations, so we got HIS point of view more often, and thus, got to know him better. However, Dyer does an excellent job of letting readers see and feel the atmosphere of the south London suburb of Brixton during the 80s when riots and violence seemed to be the norm. In the same way that the television show Call the Midwife gives audiences glimpses into East London in the late 50s, The Colour of Memory gives readers a deeper view of socioeconomic classes, race, and culture in this way. The Colour of Memory is, ultimately, a series of uneven character and environmental sketches meant to seem like an atmospheric "novel."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amit

    How does one review a book like this that has virtually no "story", although it's classified as fiction? But then Geoff Dyer is hardly about plot/story. And in that sense, it's exactly what we Geoff Dyer fans would expect. Plus, this one seems much more "natural", unlike some of his other fictional works which although still carrying the similar ingredients, seem forced -- the characters seem orchestrated/manipulated by the author, not real characters, more archetypes. Here the characters seem e How does one review a book like this that has virtually no "story", although it's classified as fiction? But then Geoff Dyer is hardly about plot/story. And in that sense, it's exactly what we Geoff Dyer fans would expect. Plus, this one seems much more "natural", unlike some of his other fictional works which although still carrying the similar ingredients, seem forced -- the characters seem orchestrated/manipulated by the author, not real characters, more archetypes. Here the characters seem entirely on their own doing exactly what they would be doing, despite what the author wanted them to do/be. Peppered with bites of wisdom that you come to expect from Dyer after reading him for a while, it's a nice read -- a quick peak into the lives of "others". In the end, the narrator asks: "what will remains of us", a question Dyer has mulled over in a separate article as well, and The Colour of Memory is really an attempt at answering it, even though not quite.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Love

    Luke kindly gave me this, and said "not much happens" which I nearly gave as a three word review, but it deserves more. Set in Brixton in the mid 1980s The Colour Memory follows a group of young adults enjoying themselves, hanging out and generally doing what young adults do. There isn't much of a plot (derided by one of the characters in the book, who is an aspiring writer, as "the ruin of a good book") and the whole thing feels more like looking at a sequence of paintings rather than reading a Luke kindly gave me this, and said "not much happens" which I nearly gave as a three word review, but it deserves more. Set in Brixton in the mid 1980s The Colour Memory follows a group of young adults enjoying themselves, hanging out and generally doing what young adults do. There isn't much of a plot (derided by one of the characters in the book, who is an aspiring writer, as "the ruin of a good book") and the whole thing feels more like looking at a sequence of paintings rather than reading a story. Given that I did pretty much the same stuff in the same places (The Effra, The Ritzy, dodgy house parties) the book has a particular resonance and interest for me, but I doubt it would have for anyone not lucky enough to have spent formative days in south london. Luke doesn't want this back, so anyone else can have it if they want.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Colin N.

    I have really liked other works by Dyer, and there is some nice imagery here and there in this book, but as a whole it rambles a bit without any point. "Color" sets out the interlocking lives of college-aged kids in 80s Brixton, including a narrator loosely based on Dyer himself - hanging out, doing drugs, moving in and out of relationships, living on the dole, going to bars. He nicely evokes a specific time and place, with a good eye for detail, but this reads to me like an early work (which it I have really liked other works by Dyer, and there is some nice imagery here and there in this book, but as a whole it rambles a bit without any point. "Color" sets out the interlocking lives of college-aged kids in 80s Brixton, including a narrator loosely based on Dyer himself - hanging out, doing drugs, moving in and out of relationships, living on the dole, going to bars. He nicely evokes a specific time and place, with a good eye for detail, but this reads to me like an early work (which it was) without any big ideas behind it. I think his fiction has taken much more interesting turns since. Still, it's an amiable enough work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janmf

    Wonderful! And this was his first novel! He describes in loving, witty and clear-eyed detail this big city world (the down-and-out, dangerous suburbs of London) of emerging adults who live a hand-to-mouth, bumbling, stumbling, funny, sometimes creative existence in rooms that you can smell. There is no real plot - or only a tiny one - but I was so entranced with each of the characters that their existence and interaction held me. It's an edgy, funny account of an age that, though I've long passe Wonderful! And this was his first novel! He describes in loving, witty and clear-eyed detail this big city world (the down-and-out, dangerous suburbs of London) of emerging adults who live a hand-to-mouth, bumbling, stumbling, funny, sometimes creative existence in rooms that you can smell. There is no real plot - or only a tiny one - but I was so entranced with each of the characters that their existence and interaction held me. It's an edgy, funny account of an age that, though I've long passed it - and though I didn't experience it quite like that - made me nostalgic for it. Great characters - and what a writer!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Hiskes

    A 'Lost Generation' novel about unemployed twenty-somethings bumming around Brixton/South London in the 1980s. The backdrop is the apparently limitless generosity of the British welfare state and the meaningless of work in late 20th-century a bureaucratic state (which is why the healthy young characters can't be bothered with work). I loved Dyer's next Lost-Gen novel, Paris Trance (and many of his books), but the characters here just didn't have much spark. A 'Lost Generation' novel about unemployed twenty-somethings bumming around Brixton/South London in the 1980s. The backdrop is the apparently limitless generosity of the British welfare state and the meaningless of work in late 20th-century a bureaucratic state (which is why the healthy young characters can't be bothered with work). I loved Dyer's next Lost-Gen novel, Paris Trance (and many of his books), but the characters here just didn't have much spark.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Davide Rubini

    Probably it starts with Dyer the British tradition of non-stories, novels written by incredibly talented and skillful writers completely deprived of any sense of the plot to the point of flirting with boredom. When this book came out Dyer, who has probably written better stuff, was acclaimed as the new wonderboy of British literature and one wonders how desertish must have been the literary scene in those years. Only plus is that it tells a lot about the area where I live, a few years back.

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