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Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves Georgia Narratives, Part 4

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most impor This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most impor This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

32 review for Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves Georgia Narratives, Part 4

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angela Lynch

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pat McNamara

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  4. 4 out of 5

    Becky West

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kidada

  7. 4 out of 5

    Crissy Troyer

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is just one of a series of interviews the government conducted with former slaves in Georgia during The Great Depression. It’s interesting to read the former slaves’ recollections and events they experienced or overhead during the slave years, and their general thoughts on the current world and society. Many, but not all, of the interviews were transcribed in dialect, so reading them is all the more special. It continues to fascinate me how many of them speak about how the youngsters of thei This is just one of a series of interviews the government conducted with former slaves in Georgia during The Great Depression. It’s interesting to read the former slaves’ recollections and events they experienced or overhead during the slave years, and their general thoughts on the current world and society. Many, but not all, of the interviews were transcribed in dialect, so reading them is all the more special. It continues to fascinate me how many of them speak about how the youngsters of their current day don’t appreciate what they have and that they are generally “lazy” (Some thoughts and comments such as these just don’t change over the centuries, do they?), and that they had a better life under slavery since they had every need securely supplied on the plantation. The contemporary black and white photographs add greatly to this work of valuable history and research. {A}

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alesia

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane Travis

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robertson

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barclay Blanchard

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ezra

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Hillstrom

  18. 5 out of 5

    Terena

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joy Jensen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lora

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gena Tribble

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Williamson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christea

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Steen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Debra

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lori Sexton

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marie Mee

  32. 5 out of 5

    Lafayette Cates

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