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Ad Reinhardt: How to Look: Art Comics

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Published on the occasion of the exhibition Ad Reinhardt at David Zwirner, New York, this catalogue presents a comprehensive exploration of the artist's cartoon works, which he created for various publications throughout his lifetime, most notably the progressive tabloid daily newspaper P.M., in which his How to Look series first appeared in 1946. Reinhardt's comics shed Published on the occasion of the exhibition Ad Reinhardt at David Zwirner, New York, this catalogue presents a comprehensive exploration of the artist's cartoon works, which he created for various publications throughout his lifetime, most notably the progressive tabloid daily newspaper P.M., in which his How to Look series first appeared in 1946. Reinhardt's comics shed light on the artist's humorous insight into art history, politics and culture, as well as his unparalleled critical sensibility as a painter and thinker. The publication includes new scholarship on this facet of Reinhardt's practice by curator Robert Storr. Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) was born in Buffalo, New York, and studied art history at Columbia University, where he forged lifelong friendships with Thomas Merton and Robert Lax. After studies at the American Artists School, he worked for the WPA and became a member of the American Abstract Artists group, with whom he exhibited for the next decade; later he was also represented by Betty Parsons. Throughout his career Reinhardt engaged in art-world activist politics, participating in the famous protests against The Museum of Modern Art in 1940 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1950 (among the group that became known as "The Irascibles").


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Published on the occasion of the exhibition Ad Reinhardt at David Zwirner, New York, this catalogue presents a comprehensive exploration of the artist's cartoon works, which he created for various publications throughout his lifetime, most notably the progressive tabloid daily newspaper P.M., in which his How to Look series first appeared in 1946. Reinhardt's comics shed Published on the occasion of the exhibition Ad Reinhardt at David Zwirner, New York, this catalogue presents a comprehensive exploration of the artist's cartoon works, which he created for various publications throughout his lifetime, most notably the progressive tabloid daily newspaper P.M., in which his How to Look series first appeared in 1946. Reinhardt's comics shed light on the artist's humorous insight into art history, politics and culture, as well as his unparalleled critical sensibility as a painter and thinker. The publication includes new scholarship on this facet of Reinhardt's practice by curator Robert Storr. Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) was born in Buffalo, New York, and studied art history at Columbia University, where he forged lifelong friendships with Thomas Merton and Robert Lax. After studies at the American Artists School, he worked for the WPA and became a member of the American Abstract Artists group, with whom he exhibited for the next decade; later he was also represented by Betty Parsons. Throughout his career Reinhardt engaged in art-world activist politics, participating in the famous protests against The Museum of Modern Art in 1940 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1950 (among the group that became known as "The Irascibles").

39 review for Ad Reinhardt: How to Look: Art Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert Jersak

    I don't know enough about art, modern art, or abstraction to fully comprehend Reinhardt's work here. But I loved every moment I spent with his "art comics." Reading these blunt, vibrant, commentary-filled panels is like walking through an art museum while stuffing firecrackers into your ears. "What do YOU represent?" I don't know enough about art, modern art, or abstraction to fully comprehend Reinhardt's work here. But I loved every moment I spent with his "art comics." Reading these blunt, vibrant, commentary-filled panels is like walking through an art museum while stuffing firecrackers into your ears. "What do YOU represent?"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Reinhardt says the same thing over and over.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jonghak Choi

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nuk Romualdez

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ted

  8. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  9. 4 out of 5

    Antonina

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Hooz

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary Davis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Borys Filonenko

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stefan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Austinlee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah W

  17. 5 out of 5

    KKDDBB

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie Peck

  19. 4 out of 5

    JDE

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    741.6 R369s 2013

  21. 4 out of 5

    April.s.l

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nebel Nacht

  24. 5 out of 5

    Connelly Library

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mahii

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason Sanders

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alli

  30. 5 out of 5

    W Roque Strew

  31. 4 out of 5

    Giulia Galbarini

  32. 5 out of 5

    April

  33. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Knoll

  34. 4 out of 5

    Doug Pfeffer

  35. 4 out of 5

    Andy Burkholder

  36. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Giard

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kellyjosephc

  38. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

  39. 4 out of 5

    Krzysztof

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