counter create hit Real Country: Music and Language in Working-Class Culture - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Real Country: Music and Language in Working-Class Culture

Availability: Ready to download

In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and its m In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and its music. Showing that country music is deeply embedded in the textures of working-class life, Fox argues that it is the cultural and intellectual property of working-class people and not only of the Nashville-based music industry or the stars whose lives figure so prominently in popular and scholarly writing about the genre.Fox spent hundreds of hours observing, recording, and participating in talk and music-making in homes, beer joints, and garage jam sessions. He renders the everyday life of Lockhart’s working-class community in detail, right down to the ice cold beer, the battered guitars, and the technical skills of such local musical legends as Randy Meyer and Larry “Hoppy” Hopkins. Throughout, Fox focuses on the human voice. His analyses of conversations, interviews, songs, and vocal techniques show how feeling and experience are expressed, and how local understandings of place, memory, musical aesthetics, working-class social history, race, and gender are shared. In Real Country, working-class Texans re-imagine their past and give voice to the struggles and satisfactions of their lives in the present through music.


Compare
Ads Banner

In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and its m In Lockhart, Texas, a rural working-class town just south of Austin, country music is a way of life. Conversation slips easily into song, and the songs are full of conversation. Anthropologist and musician Aaron A. Fox spent years in Lockhart making research notes, music, and friends. In Real Country, he provides an intimate, in-depth ethnography of the community and its music. Showing that country music is deeply embedded in the textures of working-class life, Fox argues that it is the cultural and intellectual property of working-class people and not only of the Nashville-based music industry or the stars whose lives figure so prominently in popular and scholarly writing about the genre.Fox spent hundreds of hours observing, recording, and participating in talk and music-making in homes, beer joints, and garage jam sessions. He renders the everyday life of Lockhart’s working-class community in detail, right down to the ice cold beer, the battered guitars, and the technical skills of such local musical legends as Randy Meyer and Larry “Hoppy” Hopkins. Throughout, Fox focuses on the human voice. His analyses of conversations, interviews, songs, and vocal techniques show how feeling and experience are expressed, and how local understandings of place, memory, musical aesthetics, working-class social history, race, and gender are shared. In Real Country, working-class Texans re-imagine their past and give voice to the struggles and satisfactions of their lives in the present through music.

30 review for Real Country: Music and Language in Working-Class Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Starbubbles

    so apparently trying to maintain your culture is considered a social movement. sort of a stretch, but i'll mule it over. seems to take a middle-class condescending tone to the working-class. can't seem to brake out of "working-class is dirty" descriptions. if his goal was to combat those stereotypes, he should of had a "but" statement somewhere. it does get highly theoretical in place, but you are forewarned at the beginning. i mean, there are even charts! what?! this really isn't a history bk, so apparently trying to maintain your culture is considered a social movement. sort of a stretch, but i'll mule it over. seems to take a middle-class condescending tone to the working-class. can't seem to brake out of "working-class is dirty" descriptions. if his goal was to combat those stereotypes, he should of had a "but" statement somewhere. it does get highly theoretical in place, but you are forewarned at the beginning. i mean, there are even charts! what?! this really isn't a history bk, but a ethnological study. yay. neat look at central tx though. plus the stuff on language was pretty cool. but this isn't one i would have tried to trudge through if it wasn't a requirement for a class, i would have deemed it a lost cause, and moved on.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    This book is truly, truly amazing. It is so good that I couldn't read it in public because I couldn't help but exclaim, out loud, stuff like, "Amazing!" or "Wow!" or "This is the best thing I've ever read!" I wish I could give it 6 stars. It is THAT good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    the language is very "grad school", which makes sense, but does take a bit of focus in the beginning to get into the rhythms of the language and the excessive use of "quotes" when using terms from music.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christian Layow

    Sorry never finished this book. Too academic. It had some good stuff, but needed a dictionary cracking at least twice a page. Was originally written as a Ph.D. thesis, and from what I can tell not much was removed in the way of academia language and analysis.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lars

    The best ethnography I've read in a long time. And an often moving portrait of its subject matter, the country scene in Lockhart, TX.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chandler Moore

    Linguistics + country = REAL COUNTRY

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    Really beautiful and interesting, but Fox has a tendency to romanticize that renders his discussion of gender in a tremendously male-centered society rather weak.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Ethnography of a bar in Texas.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Roggenburg

    This is an excellent read for any ethnomusicologist, cultural anthropologist, sociologist, or anyone who is generally interested in music and how it shapes identity

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eve Thomas

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christina Ellsberg

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex Saltiel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Alley

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marina

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sahvana Morri

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna Gatdula

  19. 5 out of 5

    Skyagusta

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cory Lock

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Bauer

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Rosenberg

  23. 4 out of 5

    Furious Love

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick Rowe

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashish Dadhich

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zach Fulbright

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Davis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shaina Coronel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.