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DC Graphic Novel #4: The Hunger Dogs

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The stockpiling of bombs on the planet, Apokolips, leads to its destruction when evil Darkseid detonates a demon weapon.


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The stockpiling of bombs on the planet, Apokolips, leads to its destruction when evil Darkseid detonates a demon weapon.

30 review for DC Graphic Novel #4: The Hunger Dogs

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    Firstly, I’d like to say I have not kept up with the New Gods so that did create some confusion as to what exactly was happening. The art was great. The panel layout was great. However, the way the story flowed left me asking how we got to certain conversations. I would love to know the reason behind this graphic novel. Why exactly did Kirby write this story? It was definitely interesting. We saw Darkseid emote, the destruction of New Genesis as well as the repositioning of Apokolips. But why wa Firstly, I’d like to say I have not kept up with the New Gods so that did create some confusion as to what exactly was happening. The art was great. The panel layout was great. However, the way the story flowed left me asking how we got to certain conversations. I would love to know the reason behind this graphic novel. Why exactly did Kirby write this story? It was definitely interesting. We saw Darkseid emote, the destruction of New Genesis as well as the repositioning of Apokolips. But why was it necessary? I checked to see if there were any future consequences from these events but it seems like it’s barely ever mentioned again....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    The creation of Darkseid, the New Gods and the whole 4th World saga for DC Comics in the 70s, showed that Kirby had lost none of his creative abilities. This graphic novel proves a disappointing end to the saga. The artwork is everything we love about Jack Kirby - dynamic, action-packed, and larger than life - perfect artwork for these characters. Based on the artwork, this would be 5/5. The story is hard to follow. There are scene jumps seemingly at random, and some are quite jarring, leaving me The creation of Darkseid, the New Gods and the whole 4th World saga for DC Comics in the 70s, showed that Kirby had lost none of his creative abilities. This graphic novel proves a disappointing end to the saga. The artwork is everything we love about Jack Kirby - dynamic, action-packed, and larger than life - perfect artwork for these characters. Based on the artwork, this would be 5/5. The story is hard to follow. There are scene jumps seemingly at random, and some are quite jarring, leaving me wondering if I had skipped some pages. The dialogue is even worse. I know there were production problems and large parts had to be rewritten - I don't know how much of the dialogue was changed by decrees from the editor and/or publisher - but the dialogue just doesn't ring true for these characters. Darkseid should never be the passenger that he seems to be in this story, standing on the sidelines as events pass him by, and instead of acting to achieve the outcome he desires, he philosophises. The Hunger Dogs, who, from the title, should be front and centre of the story, are bit players, rarely seen. Overall, very disappointing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dominick

    Almost incomprehensible. I suppose if you're read all of Kirby's preceding Fourth World comics (New Gods, Forever People, and Mister Miracle), cancelled years before this "conclusion" to the far-flung concept was published, this might make slightly more sense, but it's hard to imagine it'd be much more coherent. Admittedly, I haven't read all of those comics, but I have read enough of them to have the basic concept down and to know what a lot of the (unexplained) stuff here that would be literal Almost incomprehensible. I suppose if you're read all of Kirby's preceding Fourth World comics (New Gods, Forever People, and Mister Miracle), cancelled years before this "conclusion" to the far-flung concept was published, this might make slightly more sense, but it's hard to imagine it'd be much more coherent. Admittedly, I haven't read all of those comics, but I have read enough of them to have the basic concept down and to know what a lot of the (unexplained) stuff here that would be literally incomprehensible to a newcomer (mother box? boomtubes? anti-life equation?), and this still comes across as an incoherent mess. Part of that, no doubt, is because there was disagreement between Kirby and DC over how he could wrap things up--he wanted a definitive ending, they wanted their corporate properties still to be usable after the graphic novel came out--so, Kirby could not end with the intended fight to the death between Darkseid and Orion. But a large part of it, to be blunt, is because Kirby is just not that good a writer. Sample dialogue: "This is Micro-Mark's hour! There's no need for intrigue or great strivings . . . the cosmos lies open to button-pushing babes!" or "You speak like an adolescent! Love, like hate, is a thing of many facets!" "Don't lead me into a labyrinth of semantics!" Yikes! The plot, such as it is, makes little sense and remains disappointingly unresolved by the conclusion. Darkseid, the villainous ruler of Apokalips, is sort of defeated when his enemies on New Genesis blow up their own planet (yes, really), thereby making the amazingly repressed slave "hunger dogs" so concerned that their own planet might suffer that fate that they rise up against their overlord (with a little prodding from New Genesis hero/son of Darkseid--naturally--Orion) and manage through sheer force of numbers to defeat the massively technologically superior forces of Darkseid: "No force in the cosmos has ever held against the 'hunger dogs'! Their numbers are endless! Their fear is contagious! Their anger is raw power!" Oh, if only the poor repressed masses, fenced into electronically monitored ghettoes and guarded by trained military forces with supremely powerful weapons, would realize their inherent power, all repressors everywhere would be overthrown! Well, for a while, anwyay, as we're told before this is over that despite the irrepressible force of the 'hunger dogs' (why are they called hunger dogs? you'll never find out in this book!), Darkseid will in short order rebuild his power. So score one for DC keeping their big villain viable, score zero for Kirby providing a meaningful ending. The art doesn't even look that good, perhaps a function of the editorial meddling, or the fact that three different inkers did the finishing. Kirby's characteristic dynamism often looks stiff and posed here. His usual clarity of page design is often absent. At times, even figuring out how to read a page or what is going on on it is difficult. Not as difficult as it can be in many current comics, but much moreso than it usually is for Kirby, which makes one wonder how much his heart was in it, or how much meddling was going on. Anwyay, this is a huge disappointment.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Variaciones Enrojo

    Reseña de Álvaro Pons para su cárcel de papel: http://www.lacarceldepapel.com/2006/0... Tenía verdadera curiosidad por leer Perros Hambrientos, la conclusión de la saga del Cuarto Mundo que Jack Kirby abordó una década después de su abrupta cancelación. Una saga excesiva en todos los aspectos, pero definitoria de la concepción cósmico-épica que tenía Kirby de la aventura, cima de las ideas que ya se apuntaban en las sagas galácticas de los 4 Fantásticos (y que ahora, con la distancia del tiempo, p Reseña de Álvaro Pons para su cárcel de papel: http://www.lacarceldepapel.com/2006/0... Tenía verdadera curiosidad por leer Perros Hambrientos, la conclusión de la saga del Cuarto Mundo que Jack Kirby abordó una década después de su abrupta cancelación. Una saga excesiva en todos los aspectos, pero definitoria de la concepción cósmico-épica que tenía Kirby de la aventura, cima de las ideas que ya se apuntaban en las sagas galácticas de los 4 Fantásticos (y que ahora, con la distancia del tiempo, parecen cada vez más atribuibles a Kirby y no a Lee). Sin embargo, el ecuador de la década de los 80 ya empezaba a dar muestras de lo que Moore denominaría la “Era Oscura” de los superhéroes, donde difícilmente encajaba la visión del género que Kirby mantenía casi desde los 60, algo que no se le escapaba al autor, sabedor de que su tiempo había pasado. Y esa sensación es palpable en Perros Hambrientos, una novela gráfica en la que el gigantesco plan del Rey es comprimido y sintetizado en apenas unas páginas, reduciendo la grandilocuencia habitual del Cuarto Mundo a un confuso y apresurado fluir de la acción, apelotonada, vomitando ideas una detrás de otra. Kirby parece presuroso por acabar una historia que no tiene demasiado sentido acabar. Un triste final para una gran saga que es, además, masacrada por la labor de entintadores y coloristas. Pese a que las páginas entintadas por Royer son fieles a los lápices del dibujante, los otros dos entintadores masacran sistemáticamente su trabajo, convirtiendo el dibujo cortante y dinámico de Kirby en una caricatura de su estilo. Un resultado que todavía es más destrozado por unos coloristas que no entienden que el color no puede dar volúmenes a su dibujo y que, en muchos momentos, restringen su trabajo a un simple caleidoscopio de colores, sin el más mínimo sentido del balance o la armonía cromática. Un tebeo, por desgracia, totalmente olvidable, sólo para completistas de Kirby. Personalmente, prefiero ver en la saga de Orion que actualmente publica Planeta en su colección de Clásicos DC la verdadera continuación de la saga del Cuarto Mundo. Un trabajo lleno de respeto y admiración por el Rey, que continúa sus conceptos e ideas con la única idea en mente de divertir y entretener al lector con una saga épica y colosal.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sami Naik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Jack Kirby's The Hunger Dogs serves as a sequel to 'The New Gods'. It is merely one long issue of around 60 pages. This review is a SPOILER ALERT to those who are yet to read The New Gods. From The New Gods to The Hunger Dogs; from one heavy title to the one sounding like a bunch of low-life syndicates? What is Hunger Dog? Hunger Dog is actually one of the lowest classes living on the planet Apokolips, the dystopian state ruled by the mighty cruel, Darkseid. A revolt is sparked and the rebels are o Jack Kirby's The Hunger Dogs serves as a sequel to 'The New Gods'. It is merely one long issue of around 60 pages. This review is a SPOILER ALERT to those who are yet to read The New Gods. From The New Gods to The Hunger Dogs; from one heavy title to the one sounding like a bunch of low-life syndicates? What is Hunger Dog? Hunger Dog is actually one of the lowest classes living on the planet Apokolips, the dystopian state ruled by the mighty cruel, Darkseid. A revolt is sparked and the rebels are out of control. Himon and his daughter Bekka have nursed Orion and he is ready to take on from where he left. Meanwhile, Darkseid has found a technology, Micro-Mark, that can destroy a planet. So we know what planet will Darkseid consider destroying first. (Himon is the scientist and a New Genesis citizen who secretly lives in Apokolips as a Hunger Dog with Bekka. He is the one who discovered Element X through which the Mother Boxes were created. Bekka is the love interest of Orion who made her first comic appearance in this story.) The Hunger Dogs may not be that popular or anywhere close to the rank where 'The New Gods' is distinguished from the others but it is considered to be the end of the saga Jack Kirby started with The Forever People and The New Gods. The drawings are still impressive as the previous storyline. Just look at the sketches of Hunger Dogs revolt and full-page planet destruction in one of the last pages. The precise reference to find this story is by searching the 4th issue of the first volume of 'DC Graphic Novel published in 1985.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steven Bell

    The art is good in this. And sadly that's pretty much the only good thing I can say about it. It's an unmoving, incomprehensible mess. The charm of Kirby's New Gods dialogue from the 70s has been replaced by pretentious babbling. Whatever story Kirby was trying to tell here got buried under the terrible dialogue. It's a really disappointing end to his Fourth World Saga. I know there were problems behind the scenes but I think DC forcing him to change his story is the least of this book's problems. The art is good in this. And sadly that's pretty much the only good thing I can say about it. It's an unmoving, incomprehensible mess. The charm of Kirby's New Gods dialogue from the 70s has been replaced by pretentious babbling. Whatever story Kirby was trying to tell here got buried under the terrible dialogue. It's a really disappointing end to his Fourth World Saga. I know there were problems behind the scenes but I think DC forcing him to change his story is the least of this book's problems. It's just not really readable unless you have the patience to sort through and try to figure out what he's trying to say, which I do not.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Let me say something. I LOVE Jack Kirby's work. And you don't get more Jack Kirby than the New Gods. You just don't. And you don't get more New Gods than the final chapter 'The Hunger Dogs'. But there is a taint of melancholy with this book. While it was published about a decade before his death, you get the feeling Kirby knew something.... while he might produce other comics and cartoons after this... and he did... never again would he produce something this good again. It shows in the story he Let me say something. I LOVE Jack Kirby's work. And you don't get more Jack Kirby than the New Gods. You just don't. And you don't get more New Gods than the final chapter 'The Hunger Dogs'. But there is a taint of melancholy with this book. While it was published about a decade before his death, you get the feeling Kirby knew something.... while he might produce other comics and cartoons after this... and he did... never again would he produce something this good again. It shows in the story he's telling, the theme's he's addressing... and most importantly... the way it ends. However, what an ending it is... it is perhaps the most Jack Kirby of Jack Kirby stories ever told.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve Munroe

    The Hunger Dogs is classic Jack Kirby. A lot of action, though more subdued than most of the original eleven issues of the 1970s comic series, and appearances by most of the cast of The New Gods. Darkseid, Orion, Highfather and Lightray are all in top form. A warning, if you haven't read the originals you may get lost in this book. There is a large cast to it. The Hunger Dogs is classic Jack Kirby. A lot of action, though more subdued than most of the original eleven issues of the 1970s comic series, and appearances by most of the cast of The New Gods. Darkseid, Orion, Highfather and Lightray are all in top form. A warning, if you haven't read the originals you may get lost in this book. There is a large cast to it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Chalfant

    Iconic Jack Kirby puts an end to his New Gods (4th world) story (with awesome art as usual by "The King"). Iconic Jack Kirby puts an end to his New Gods (4th world) story (with awesome art as usual by "The King").

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Grading this on a curb given the circumstances in which Kirby was given to write it, I'd give it 4/5 stars. The story certainly feels rushed, but that couldn't be helped. One thing I think this actually did better than the prior 4th world stuff was that it was (forced) to be more focused on a single story between New Genesis and Apokalips rather than random 70s high jinks. Grading this on a curb given the circumstances in which Kirby was given to write it, I'd give it 4/5 stars. The story certainly feels rushed, but that couldn't be helped. One thing I think this actually did better than the prior 4th world stuff was that it was (forced) to be more focused on a single story between New Genesis and Apokalips rather than random 70s high jinks.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Walker

    The quality of this story is largely compromised by the length of time between Kirby's prior work on the property as well as numerous editorial errors. A superior version of the story exists in Jack Kirby's Fourth World Vol. 4 and I recommend reading it there. The quality of this story is largely compromised by the length of time between Kirby's prior work on the property as well as numerous editorial errors. A superior version of the story exists in Jack Kirby's Fourth World Vol. 4 and I recommend reading it there.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Supongo que si me animo a hacer maratón de los 10 Cuarto Mundo de Kirby que sacó Planeta la conclusión lógica sería leerme este tomo. Espero lograrlo antes de que se nos venga encima el Quinto Mundo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  14. 4 out of 5

    Troy-David Phillips

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zoltan Szeman

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liam Martin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Moby-Nostromo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rodder

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lucio Minucio

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  21. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe Kuth

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Innsmouth

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ben Humeniuk

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alberto J Proffetti

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  30. 4 out of 5

    Solitairerose

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