counter create hit Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the American Century - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the American Century

Availability: Ready to download

Protestant missionaries in Latin America. Colonial "civilizers" in the Pacific. Peace Corps Volunteers in Africa. Since the 1890s, thousands of American teachers--mostly young, white, middle-class, and inexperienced--have fanned out across the globe. "Innocents Abroad" tells the story of what they intended to teach and what lessons they learned. Drawing on extensive Protestant missionaries in Latin America. Colonial "civilizers" in the Pacific. Peace Corps Volunteers in Africa. Since the 1890s, thousands of American teachers--mostly young, white, middle-class, and inexperienced--have fanned out across the globe. "Innocents Abroad" tells the story of what they intended to teach and what lessons they learned. Drawing on extensive archives of the teachers' letters and diaries, as well as more recent accounts, Jonathan Zimmerman argues that until the early twentieth century, the teachers assumed their own superiority; they sought to bring civilization, Protestantism, and soap to their host countries. But by the mid-twentieth century, as teachers borrowed the concept of "culture" from influential anthropologists, they became far more self-questioning about their ethical and social assumptions, their educational theories, and the complexity of their role in a foreign society. Filled with anecdotes and dilemmas--often funny, always vivid--Zimmerman's narrative explores the teachers' shifting attitudes about their country and themselves, in a world that was more unexpected and unsettling than they could have imagined.


Compare
Ads Banner

Protestant missionaries in Latin America. Colonial "civilizers" in the Pacific. Peace Corps Volunteers in Africa. Since the 1890s, thousands of American teachers--mostly young, white, middle-class, and inexperienced--have fanned out across the globe. "Innocents Abroad" tells the story of what they intended to teach and what lessons they learned. Drawing on extensive Protestant missionaries in Latin America. Colonial "civilizers" in the Pacific. Peace Corps Volunteers in Africa. Since the 1890s, thousands of American teachers--mostly young, white, middle-class, and inexperienced--have fanned out across the globe. "Innocents Abroad" tells the story of what they intended to teach and what lessons they learned. Drawing on extensive archives of the teachers' letters and diaries, as well as more recent accounts, Jonathan Zimmerman argues that until the early twentieth century, the teachers assumed their own superiority; they sought to bring civilization, Protestantism, and soap to their host countries. But by the mid-twentieth century, as teachers borrowed the concept of "culture" from influential anthropologists, they became far more self-questioning about their ethical and social assumptions, their educational theories, and the complexity of their role in a foreign society. Filled with anecdotes and dilemmas--often funny, always vivid--Zimmerman's narrative explores the teachers' shifting attitudes about their country and themselves, in a world that was more unexpected and unsettling than they could have imagined.

36 review for Innocents Abroad: American Teachers in the American Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This book focuses on one of the most visible groups of Americans who live and work abroad: teachers. Zimmerman shows that there were differences between those who went abroad in the first half of the 20th century and those who left in the latter half. Though the social, historical and political frameworks changed over time, he notes that there has always been a diversity of opinion and a lively debate about just what these Americans were doing (or supposed to be doing) abroad. There are things This book focuses on one of the most visible groups of Americans who live and work abroad: teachers. Zimmerman shows that there were differences between those who went abroad in the first half of the 20th century and those who left in the latter half. Though the social, historical and political frameworks changed over time, he notes that there has always been a diversity of opinion and a lively debate about just what these Americans were doing (or supposed to be doing) abroad. There are things in here that will make Americans wince - not just how some Americans viewed the countries where they worked (especially those that were a part of the American empire like Puerto Rico or the Philippines) in the first part of the 20th century but also how this continued in a different way in different regions in the second half of the century. He also shows how these Americans abroad found that there were things they heartily approved of in their host countries (like government support for religious schools) and so they brought those things back to the US. The only quibble I have with the book is that I would have liked more discussion about the late 20th century and a longer chapter (not just an epilogue) on American teachers in an globalized world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zhelana

    This book could easily be summed up "The Catholics and protestants fought, and everyone was racist as fuck." It basically describes Americans who go abroad to teach school. It talks about how they all hit the kids, even if they would never hit their own kids, because they were racist as fuck. Then it talks about how they viewed imperialism, even though they were the biggest imperialists, and racist as fuck. I think the author may have bitten off more than he could chew with such a broad topic. I This book could easily be summed up "The Catholics and protestants fought, and everyone was racist as fuck." It basically describes Americans who go abroad to teach school. It talks about how they all hit the kids, even if they would never hit their own kids, because they were racist as fuck. Then it talks about how they viewed imperialism, even though they were the biggest imperialists, and racist as fuck. I think the author may have bitten off more than he could chew with such a broad topic. I mean history 101 is to pick a small specific topic. This was like all the teachers for an entire century, and it was just too much. I have no doubt the author knows what he's talking about, but in large part, I don't because it was too much information shoved into too little space. It makes me glad I didn't wind up in the peace corps when I graduated from college with how little preparation for teaching these people got, and how they tried to pass that off as a good thing. Basically, once again I find myself uncertain what I thought of the book. It didn't stand out much, and I'm not sure I retained much. I considered putting it down at one point, but then found myself in a new chapter that stopped being repetitive like the earlier chapters were. It was an alright book. I wouldn't recommend it though unless you're going abroad to teach and need to earn what not to do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    C

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Kirwan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holly

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denice

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bradley Mcdonald

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Susan

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Morin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  15. 4 out of 5

    Davidilgen

  16. 4 out of 5

    Monica

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  18. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  19. 4 out of 5

    Acquisitions

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dominique

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Robinson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eikonic

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laohudan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Malcolm

  31. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  32. 4 out of 5

    Collin Doerr-Newton

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Baker

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  35. 4 out of 5

    LPenting

  36. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.