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James Beard Award Winner (Vegetarian) IACP Award Winner (Healthy Eating) A sophisticated vegetarian cookbook with all the tools you need to be at home in your kitchen, cooking in the most nourishing and delicious ways—from the foundations of stocking a pantry and understanding your ingredients, to preparing elaborate seasonal feasts. Imagine you are in a bright, breezy kitc James Beard Award Winner (Vegetarian) IACP Award Winner (Healthy Eating) A sophisticated vegetarian cookbook with all the tools you need to be at home in your kitchen, cooking in the most nourishing and delicious ways—from the foundations of stocking a pantry and understanding your ingredients, to preparing elaborate seasonal feasts. Imagine you are in a bright, breezy kitchen. There are large bowls on the counter full of lush, colorful produce and a cake stand stacked with pretty whole-grain muffins. On the shelves live rows of glass jars containing grains, seeds, beans, nuts, and spices. You open the fridge and therein you find a bottle of fresh almond milk, cooked beans, soaking grains, dressings, ferments, and seasonal produce. This is Amy Chaplin’s kitchen. It is a heavenly place, and this book will make it your kitchen too. With her love of whole food and knowledge as a chef, Chaplin has written a book that will inspire you to eat well at every meal. Part One lays the foundation for stocking the pantry. This is not just a list of food and equipment; it’s real working information—how and why to use ingredients—and an arsenal of simple recipes for daily nourishment. Also included throughout are tips on living a whole food lifestyle: planning weekly menus, why organic is important, composting, plastics vs. glass, drinking tea, doing a whole food cleanse, and much more. Part Two is a collection of recipes (most of which are naturally gluten-free) celebrating vegetarian cuisine in its brightest, whole, sophisticated form. Black rice breakfast pudding with coconut and banana? Yes, please. Beet tartlets with poppy seed crust and white bean fennel filling? I’ll take two. Fragrant eggplant curry with cardamom basmati rice, apricot chutney, and cucumber lime raita? Invite company. Roasted fig raspberry tart with toasted almond crust? There is always room for this kind of dessert. If you are an omnivore, you will delight in this book for its playful use of produce and know-how in balancing food groups. If you are a vegetarian, this book will become your best friend, always there for you when you’re on your own, and ready to lend a hand when you’re sharing food with family and friends. If you are a vegan, you can cook nearly every recipe in this book and feed your body well in the truest sense. This is whole food for everyone.


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James Beard Award Winner (Vegetarian) IACP Award Winner (Healthy Eating) A sophisticated vegetarian cookbook with all the tools you need to be at home in your kitchen, cooking in the most nourishing and delicious ways—from the foundations of stocking a pantry and understanding your ingredients, to preparing elaborate seasonal feasts. Imagine you are in a bright, breezy kitc James Beard Award Winner (Vegetarian) IACP Award Winner (Healthy Eating) A sophisticated vegetarian cookbook with all the tools you need to be at home in your kitchen, cooking in the most nourishing and delicious ways—from the foundations of stocking a pantry and understanding your ingredients, to preparing elaborate seasonal feasts. Imagine you are in a bright, breezy kitchen. There are large bowls on the counter full of lush, colorful produce and a cake stand stacked with pretty whole-grain muffins. On the shelves live rows of glass jars containing grains, seeds, beans, nuts, and spices. You open the fridge and therein you find a bottle of fresh almond milk, cooked beans, soaking grains, dressings, ferments, and seasonal produce. This is Amy Chaplin’s kitchen. It is a heavenly place, and this book will make it your kitchen too. With her love of whole food and knowledge as a chef, Chaplin has written a book that will inspire you to eat well at every meal. Part One lays the foundation for stocking the pantry. This is not just a list of food and equipment; it’s real working information—how and why to use ingredients—and an arsenal of simple recipes for daily nourishment. Also included throughout are tips on living a whole food lifestyle: planning weekly menus, why organic is important, composting, plastics vs. glass, drinking tea, doing a whole food cleanse, and much more. Part Two is a collection of recipes (most of which are naturally gluten-free) celebrating vegetarian cuisine in its brightest, whole, sophisticated form. Black rice breakfast pudding with coconut and banana? Yes, please. Beet tartlets with poppy seed crust and white bean fennel filling? I’ll take two. Fragrant eggplant curry with cardamom basmati rice, apricot chutney, and cucumber lime raita? Invite company. Roasted fig raspberry tart with toasted almond crust? There is always room for this kind of dessert. If you are an omnivore, you will delight in this book for its playful use of produce and know-how in balancing food groups. If you are a vegetarian, this book will become your best friend, always there for you when you’re on your own, and ready to lend a hand when you’re sharing food with family and friends. If you are a vegan, you can cook nearly every recipe in this book and feed your body well in the truest sense. This is whole food for everyone.

30 review for At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I find this book unbelievably irritating, but the fact that I love it anyway shows how good it is. I was in a major cooking rut and really wanted a cookbook that would transform my life the way Deborah Madison's indispensable classic Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone did years ago, not just by giving me new recipes, but by changing the way I cook, and a friend recommended this one. I'm definitely not some master chef and I don't want another complicated set of recipes that require fancy ingredients I find this book unbelievably irritating, but the fact that I love it anyway shows how good it is. I was in a major cooking rut and really wanted a cookbook that would transform my life the way Deborah Madison's indispensable classic Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone did years ago, not just by giving me new recipes, but by changing the way I cook, and a friend recommended this one. I'm definitely not some master chef and I don't want another complicated set of recipes that require fancy ingredients and equipment (such as a food processor) that I don't have. There is a little bit of that here -- for some insane reason she believes I have access to a spice grinder, and there are a few obscure items you can get certain times a year at a NYC greenmarket but certainly not in Miami -- but for the most part this food is simple, in that good way that gives you a new idea for how to cook something like greens or tempeh that you might eat a few times a week. Chaplin has a few simple tricks -- add crushed garlic to greens and tofu the way you probably already make them, put apple cider vinegar and/or tamari in everything, etc. -- that have just made the boring stuff I eat all the time a little bit different. Some recipes are so simple they seem kind of dumb to include -- add vinegar to beets and put them in the fridge to marinate them? Uh, thanks... -- but some of the more complex ones, like the Quinoa Beet Salad, are interesting but easy enough that I've made them more than once. The book is gorgeously illustrated BUT INCREDIBLY IRRITATING in a way that probably wouldn't bother most people but that MAKES ME INSANE. Every single time she tells you to put water in something she specifies that it needs to be "filtered water," and whenever she tells you to put kombu in your broth she orders you to COMPOST the kombu when you're done. ARGH! To me this feels completely judgy and obnoxious and unnecessary; if you think I should filter my water and compost my kombu just say it in the introduction and then leave me alone, lady! I was also annoyed that she kept talking about how *her clients* like this and her she makes *her clients* that, and the back cover lists which celebrities she cooks for, like I'm supposed to be more excited about eating a curry if Natalie Portman thinks it's good... yuck. Finally, I am so sick of cookbooks talking about food like it's medicine, and making dubious health claims about why I should eat flax seeds or blueberries or whatever the hell thing. I actually enjoyed that kind of talk years ago when I used to read fitness magazines on the exercise equipment at the gym, but I don't appreciate it in my cookbooks. I want to eat vegetables because they taste delicious and are actual food, not because they contain "blood-building nutrients" or whatever, and that kind of talk sort of kills my appetite and makes me go want to eat some ice cream because suddenly whatever I was planning to eat doesn't sound like much fun. BUT! I am totally addicted to her Dijon Mustard-Marinated Tempeh, which is something I never would've thought of on my own and that I'm now making a few times a week. It is so incredibly easy and so incredibly good and it makes me love Amy Chaplin with all her awful nagging and I think she should get some kind of prize for it. You just cut a piece of tempeh into sixteen triangles, and then you marinate it for a little while in a half cup of apple juice, a tbsp of dijon, a tbsp of tamari, 2 tbsp olive oil, and 2 tsp apple cider vinegar all whisked together, and then you just bake it at 350 for like 30-40 minutes. OH MAN! It's awesome. Life altering. Seriously. For me it has been, anyway. I haven't cooked that many recipes in here yet, but the ones I have made have been easy and good, and I do recommend buying this book. It is really beautifully put together with lovely photographs and the the things I find annoying almost certainly won't bother you that much, so if you like this kind of food (tempeh, beets, grains, etc.) I'd say go for it. I am actually considering a water filter because, annoyed as I am, I think she is probably right, and I've noticed that coffee tastes better when it's brewed with filtered water, so... So. I also am feeling massively guilt-tripped into finally starting to soak beans and grains, which I've never done due to commitment issues and generally poor planning. I'm sort of on the fence with some of that because she wants you to soak stuff like quinoa for what sound like maybe made-up reasons, but I know she is right about how I am such a sad loser and terrible person for always using canned beans. Sigh.

  2. 4 out of 5

    P.

    I keep getting this from the library and having to relinquish it because of holds. but it's worth it! I finally made things from it the 3rd go round. I made: millet cauliflower mash steamed greens with zesty flax dressing parsley brown rice salad with seeds (misleading title - this is really tabbouleh with brown rice & seeds) pasta with kale, caramelized onions, and goat cheese (I added shiitakes to this) marinated beets dijon-mustard marinated tempeh (okay, but only if you re-heat the tempeh before u I keep getting this from the library and having to relinquish it because of holds. but it's worth it! I finally made things from it the 3rd go round. I made: millet cauliflower mash steamed greens with zesty flax dressing parsley brown rice salad with seeds (misleading title - this is really tabbouleh with brown rice & seeds) pasta with kale, caramelized onions, and goat cheese (I added shiitakes to this) marinated beets dijon-mustard marinated tempeh (okay, but only if you re-heat the tempeh before using) vanilla chia pudding (not so great unless you have a blender. but still tasty. just looks gross.) lentil soup with rosemary, squash, and rainbow chard kabocha chestnut soup with nori sesame "leaves" sprout salad with toasted sunflower seeds and umeboshi vinaigrette rustic pea spread (basically just mashed peas and garlic. I added sage.) I liked all of them, although Chaplin's taste is much more to the sweeter side than mine. Not that I oversalt things - I still have salt from when I moved last year. We just have different taste profiles when we mix veggies and veggie like fruits, or maybe it is that I prefer things acidic and she alkaline. But the thing I love about this book is that I still want to try so many of the recipes. It's things that are different from what I normally eat but attractive to me, and they incorporate a bunch of grains I don't normally eat. Most of them complement each other, which makes it easier to plan a week of meals, and most keep well (the exception was the millet-cauliflower mash which was good on the first day and then had diminishing returns). And once you get the pantry set up, it is relatively inexpensive. Chaplin is insistent on soaking grains and beans to dissolve phytic acid, which she says impedes digestion. I think this is a goal to be met in future when I can focus on reminding myself to soak things. I did soak some things for these recipes and my digestion seemed a bit less rocky? but it was by no means a controlled experiment. 2 things that were irksome: the book refuses to stay open on its own. bad form for a cookbook lots of mentions of "detoxing" ugh

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Dubbels

    I was gifted this book and it's lush and gorgeous. I can't wait to make most of the recipes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    It's almost a meditative cookbook. I come back to it over and over just to look through. Loved the zucchini salad and the butternut squash lasagna was a hit at our holiday dinner last year.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I wouldn't normally put a cookbook up as "currently reading," but this one is huge and gorgeous and has me immediately wanting to curl up in a big chair and just read and take notes while I generate ideas.---- Finished this late last night: It was a nice break from the health-focused "whole foods-plant based" dietary manuals/cookbooks of the Campbell-Esselstyn-McDougall-Brenda Davis-Forks Over Knives variety and the other extreme which I keep encountering: the irreverent tattooed punker-vegan Th I wouldn't normally put a cookbook up as "currently reading," but this one is huge and gorgeous and has me immediately wanting to curl up in a big chair and just read and take notes while I generate ideas.---- Finished this late last night: It was a nice break from the health-focused "whole foods-plant based" dietary manuals/cookbooks of the Campbell-Esselstyn-McDougall-Brenda Davis-Forks Over Knives variety and the other extreme which I keep encountering: the irreverent tattooed punker-vegan Thugs-with-a-vengeance set. (I actually own one cookbook called Eat Like You Give a Damn and another called Eat Like You Give a F*uck- and I love them both.) This is a beautiful book featuring delicious-looking food made by a pretty chef (who namedrops her celebrity clients like Natalie Portman and Liv Tyler), but once I got into the recipes I realized how pretentious it was. The ingredient lists weren't particularly long, but she is big on sea vegetables that I don't have access to, and she has buy organic or not-at-all strictures, and a strong macrobiotic influence - which is not really my thing (at this time). Copying a few recipes and returning to the library: Dijon Mustard-Marinated Tempeh Curried Quinoa Pilaf with Toasted Cashews Quinoa Pilaf with Golden Raisins and Almonds Miso Mayonnaise Rustic Pea Spread White Bean Artichoke Aioli

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alice Marsh-Elmer

    A perfect, super appetizing manual-style cookbook that provides ease of access to best practices for incorporating whole foods into your diet and your kitchen. Seriously, I just pre-ordered it. As a bit of a foodie (and a bit of a workaholic) I enjoy reading about food--tons--and, more often than not, am unable to follow through on all of my grand schemes to cook differently when I get home, exhausted and starving, forced to stir something up that's edible for dinner and I revert to my old habits A perfect, super appetizing manual-style cookbook that provides ease of access to best practices for incorporating whole foods into your diet and your kitchen. Seriously, I just pre-ordered it. As a bit of a foodie (and a bit of a workaholic) I enjoy reading about food--tons--and, more often than not, am unable to follow through on all of my grand schemes to cook differently when I get home, exhausted and starving, forced to stir something up that's edible for dinner and I revert to my old habits. To be fair, my "old habits" are founded in healthy foods, and almost always consist of a vegetable and a grain, one or both of which are tossed with a bit of spice or an herb, toasted with some olive oil, and then ceremoniously dumped into a bowl. Where I fall short is trying new things. Vegetables, beans, and legumes is a healthy way to eat, and, at times, a rather boring one. This book was so easy to flip through for information and inspiration that my tastebuds were drooling and I was yearning for dinner. I like that she's not afraid to make simple, wholesome recipes and the tips and tricks for a busy lifestyle that are seamlessly incorporated. The quick "charts" (in the form of numbered pictures) makes digesting a whole lot of information about new types of foods to try real easy. After reading this I felt inspired more than overwhelmed, and mostly I feel that I can run to the grocery store and pick out 1 or 2 new things to incorporate into my lifestyle easily, and 1 or 2 quick recipes to spice up what I already know how to cook. That's the mark of a cookbook I'll use time and again.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    3.5 stars This is a comprehensive guide to vegetarian/vegan cooking, covering everything from how to stock your pantry to recipes starting at breakfast ally he way to desserts. I love the emphasis on fresh whole foods. A few of the ingredients are difficult to find in my area and I felt like a lot of the recipes were under-seasoned for my taste - but that can be easily adjusted on your own. I make pasta with kale all the time but had never thought of adding caramelized onions so the Whole-Wheat Fet 3.5 stars This is a comprehensive guide to vegetarian/vegan cooking, covering everything from how to stock your pantry to recipes starting at breakfast ally he way to desserts. I love the emphasis on fresh whole foods. A few of the ingredients are difficult to find in my area and I felt like a lot of the recipes were under-seasoned for my taste - but that can be easily adjusted on your own. I make pasta with kale all the time but had never thought of adding caramelized onions so the Whole-Wheat Fettuccine with Kale, Caramelized Onions, and Marinated Goat Cheese was something I was familiar with but made an already reliable/good dish even better. I'm also always looking for a new way to make tempeh other than dumping sauce on it. Dijon Mustard-Marinated Tempeh was another flavorful dish. I'm a lazy cook and I get overwhelmed by long lists and this cookbook loves long lists. If you break it down though it's usually the main ingredient then the dressing etc. Nothing too daunting but I would have liked more fast meals.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kirra

    I love this cookbook! Everything about it. Fabulous. In saying that, I have always been a keen cook. So sourcing unusual ingredients is exciting for me. I am someone who plans, and makes a lot of time to cook with friends and family. In other words am obsessed with cooking and food. If you are someone who finds cooking a chore, have limited time etc. you may find this book frustrating. I have found that her use of soaked bean, grain etc have actually saved me a heap of time and money. (And when I love this cookbook! Everything about it. Fabulous. In saying that, I have always been a keen cook. So sourcing unusual ingredients is exciting for me. I am someone who plans, and makes a lot of time to cook with friends and family. In other words am obsessed with cooking and food. If you are someone who finds cooking a chore, have limited time etc. you may find this book frustrating. I have found that her use of soaked bean, grain etc have actually saved me a heap of time and money. (And when soaking things like quinoa, that bitter taste disappears). Additionally, if you live rurally/have limited ingredient options you may be disappointed. In saying that, I often sub ingredients that I don't have all the time and they work just as well! The desserts are fabulous. Although seemingly laborious and complicated ingredients, when made the second time it's a lot easier as you get used to the style. (My bf made me the choc hazelnut cake SO GOOD). This is my go-to recipe book. I adore everything about it xx

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda B

    4.5 stars Beautifully illustrated vegetarian/vegan cook book. The cookbooks contains useful info on plant based staples i.e. how to soak & cook beans, grains ( I didn't realise I needed to soak grains overnight due to physic acid) & nuts; sprouting; seaweed types etc. How to avoid plastics. The majority of the recipes are vegan and where Amy uses goat cheese this can be easily veganised by using Almond Feta instead : http://thekindcook.com/?s=Almond+feta+ 4.5 stars Beautifully illustrated vegetarian/vegan cook book. The cookbooks contains useful info on plant based staples i.e. how to soak & cook beans, grains ( I didn't realise I needed to soak grains overnight due to physic acid) & nuts; sprouting; seaweed types etc. How to avoid plastics. The majority of the recipes are vegan and where Amy uses goat cheese this can be easily veganised by using Almond Feta instead : http://thekindcook.com/?s=Almond+feta+

  10. 5 out of 5

    Radina Valova

    This book is a fantastic resource, whether you're new to home cooking and clean eating or already have some healthy habits but want to up the ante. Amy Chaplin offers an in-depth look at how to stock your pantry and how to prep the pantry basics (legumes, grains, etc.). One of the things I like best about the book is that most of the ingredients she references are easily accessible to most shoppers - one of my biggest pet-peeves with healthy-eating books is that authors seem to assume that you l This book is a fantastic resource, whether you're new to home cooking and clean eating or already have some healthy habits but want to up the ante. Amy Chaplin offers an in-depth look at how to stock your pantry and how to prep the pantry basics (legumes, grains, etc.). One of the things I like best about the book is that most of the ingredients she references are easily accessible to most shoppers - one of my biggest pet-peeves with healthy-eating books is that authors seem to assume that you live in Southern California on a Gwenyth Paltrow budget and have access to obscure "superfood" ingredients you've never heard of. Chaplin does recommend some less-accessible pantry staples (e.g., teff - an Ethiopian seed that can be used like quinoa, as a grain), but the bulk of the staples are easy to find (lentils, chickpeas, etc.). More importantly, the book focuses on how you build a nutritious meal from scratch, rather than the precise ingredients that you should use - that is its greatest strength. Since I read it, I have kept my refrigerator stocked with cooked grains and legumes that I use as a base for all sorts of quick weekday meals: lentils as a base for a salad, quinoa with avocado and scrambled or hard-boiled egg - the options are endlessly flexible, based on what you have at hand, once you learn the basics.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I'm willing to bet this food is delicious. The photos are pretty nice. The flavor combinations seem like ones I would enjoy. But this thing is seriously overwhelming. Every recipe seems to have about 20 ingredients, and the instructions/intros take up an entire page in small print. It's really off-putting. I had trouble even really focusing on reading through this at all because it's so heavy, and because something about the font used and the sheer volume of text short circuited my brain. Or som I'm willing to bet this food is delicious. The photos are pretty nice. The flavor combinations seem like ones I would enjoy. But this thing is seriously overwhelming. Every recipe seems to have about 20 ingredients, and the instructions/intros take up an entire page in small print. It's really off-putting. I had trouble even really focusing on reading through this at all because it's so heavy, and because something about the font used and the sheer volume of text short circuited my brain. Or something. There wasn't a single thing that seemed easily doable to me. I will freely admit that I am a lazy cook. VERY lazy. But even so, there's usually something that grabs my attention and seems like I could give it a try for dinner one night or breakfast one morning. I feel like my eyes kept just sliding right off the page in this one. It's just too much!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Judyw

    There are many, good recipes in this cookbook (and many that look good). But maybe there are too many recipes in this cookbook. I borrowed this book from the library. Too bad it's so large. I was only able to make a couple recipes, and won't be purchasing the book, since it's so large and hardcover. This book is almost 400 pages. The handful of photos are nice, and I like the part about setting up your pantry. But many pages have a lot of white space. Who knows, I may borrow it from the library There are many, good recipes in this cookbook (and many that look good). But maybe there are too many recipes in this cookbook. I borrowed this book from the library. Too bad it's so large. I was only able to make a couple recipes, and won't be purchasing the book, since it's so large and hardcover. This book is almost 400 pages. The handful of photos are nice, and I like the part about setting up your pantry. But many pages have a lot of white space. Who knows, I may borrow it from the library another time in the future.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Arianne

    To sum it up: this book inspires you to cook! I will definitely purchase and make many of the recipes. The only downside is the book references ingredients that aren’t as easy to find in smaller towns, and I personally prefer cooking with more dairy. That being said, it’s a great book for anyone who’ll follows more of a vegetarian/ vegan diet!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joyful

    This book in incredibly informative for this who are setting up their whole food, plant-based kitchen. The recipes vary from simple vegan staples (like DIY almond milk) to more fanciful dishes (all of the tarts!). This would make a great gift, either to a friend or for yourself.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I chose this cookbook for the vegan ideas and beautiful layout - photos and words - and for the clean, end results. Recipe can be quite in-depth, but the finish was spot on. Delicious! I look forward to trying more recipes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Bales

    This is my favorite cookbook by far. Amy talks about ingredients, the pantry, and recipes in a sustainable way. I love reading someone who admits to eating the same thing for breakfast! It's refreshing to see what real-world chefs eat themselves instead of gourmet once-in-a-while dishes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andjelka Jankovic

    Love Amy’s down to earth tone and farmers market obsession, plus all the GF/DF recipes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ambur Taft

    Lovely cookbook....beautiful pictures and loads of information on so much great food. This will be a delicious addition to my kitchen.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    Overall, I think this cookbook succeeds at serving its purpose: it is full of nutritious, whole-food recipes (mostly vegan) that will make you want to treat your body well. Some of the recipes have unusual flavor profiles that I look forward to incorporating into my cooking (corn with black sesame, cauliflower with shiitakes). However, for my part, I can't imagine eating like this most of the time, and I eat pretty well to begin with. Many of these recipes seem like "side dishes" and certainly w Overall, I think this cookbook succeeds at serving its purpose: it is full of nutritious, whole-food recipes (mostly vegan) that will make you want to treat your body well. Some of the recipes have unusual flavor profiles that I look forward to incorporating into my cooking (corn with black sesame, cauliflower with shiitakes). However, for my part, I can't imagine eating like this most of the time, and I eat pretty well to begin with. Many of these recipes seem like "side dishes" and certainly wouldn't fill up an average adult human. Very elegant, nutritious side dishes, but still not a real meal.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Overall, this book is a well-crafted manual of incredibly healthy and beautifully photographed recipes. The pro's far outweigh the con's. However, there are a few issues that prevent the five-star rating. Several of the recipes call for ingredients that I cannot obtain, despite living in a mid-sized city with decent grocery and specialty stores. The author lives in NYC; anyone living in a city closer to this size will probably be able to find these ingredients. Also, with a few exceptions (e.g. Overall, this book is a well-crafted manual of incredibly healthy and beautifully photographed recipes. The pro's far outweigh the con's. However, there are a few issues that prevent the five-star rating. Several of the recipes call for ingredients that I cannot obtain, despite living in a mid-sized city with decent grocery and specialty stores. The author lives in NYC; anyone living in a city closer to this size will probably be able to find these ingredients. Also, with a few exceptions (e.g. Soaked Goji Berry and Chia oatmeal), many of the recipes will take a length of time not suitable for a weeknight dinner. This book is full of gems and I particularly enjoyed the information on whole foods in general. The author explains health benefits and how to properly soak and prepare beans and whole grains, how to toast nuts and seeds, and how to get the most nutrients and taste out of your food. Also, the author is a chef and her imagination and skill shines through in many of these dishes, and I believe I have learned quite a bit about cooking and suspect I will be a better cook for having read this book. Photographs of the food are stunning and motivate the reader to try many of the dishes despite the occasionally above-average difficulty level.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    everything looked healthy and hearty and fairly delicious. if i was into egg-less desserts, or using spelt/millet/chia seeds everywhere, i would definitely be into this. one of my main problems: the long lists of ingredients, which tended to include esoteric ingredients (hello, ume plum vinegar) without any recommendation of where to find it or any subs. the reader could ostensibly research this on their own, but isn't it the author's job to encourage (in my mind, a major part of this is removing everything looked healthy and hearty and fairly delicious. if i was into egg-less desserts, or using spelt/millet/chia seeds everywhere, i would definitely be into this. one of my main problems: the long lists of ingredients, which tended to include esoteric ingredients (hello, ume plum vinegar) without any recommendation of where to find it or any subs. the reader could ostensibly research this on their own, but isn't it the author's job to encourage (in my mind, a major part of this is removing as many obstacles to cooking as possible) the cook? which bring me to another point. a lot of these seem like they'd be pretty time-intensive recipes. as we get deeper into fall and i get more busy, i don't have the time to make all of the components that seem critical to these dishes (you could make just the eggplant curry on pg 251, but it wouldn't be nearly the same without the cardamom-infused basmati rice, tangy apricot chutney, and/or cucumber lime raita).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie H.

    This cookbook would make a fabulous gift for any vegetarian on your gift-giving list. For other folks, it's got some great stuff (esp. solid advice on stocking the vegetarian pantry and sauces such as harissa and chimichurri that are eaten anywhere along the dietary continuum) including welcome items in any kitchen such as blackberry cornmeal muffins, French lentil soup with rosemary, squash, and rainbow chard, or crispy smashed baby potatoes with cap garlic yogurt dip as just a few examples. Wh This cookbook would make a fabulous gift for any vegetarian on your gift-giving list. For other folks, it's got some great stuff (esp. solid advice on stocking the vegetarian pantry and sauces such as harissa and chimichurri that are eaten anywhere along the dietary continuum) including welcome items in any kitchen such as blackberry cornmeal muffins, French lentil soup with rosemary, squash, and rainbow chard, or crispy smashed baby potatoes with cap garlic yogurt dip as just a few examples. While some of what Chaplin qualifies as "easy," I would not be so ready to tackle on a daily basis (e.g., fermenting your spelt dough for 14 hours prior to working it), this book is absolutely gorgeous--large, hardback, heavy paper, and beautiful photos. The explanations are clear, the philosophy not overly preachy, and while I'm not sure our family's dietary needs warrant its purchase, I would certainly purchase it as a gift for the right person.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pat Murphy

    Ok, this is another cookbook. I enjoyed it very much for a couple of reasons. The author takes the time to tell you how to setup your kitchen for her kind of cooking. She shows a passion for her kind of cooking as well. She is a proponent of all natural, good nutrition. It is hard not to get your heart in this with her as she makes this style of cooking so enchanting. She goes with natural the flow of seasons (summer winter etc.) and believes in using products from nearby. A big naturally sustai Ok, this is another cookbook. I enjoyed it very much for a couple of reasons. The author takes the time to tell you how to setup your kitchen for her kind of cooking. She shows a passion for her kind of cooking as well. She is a proponent of all natural, good nutrition. It is hard not to get your heart in this with her as she makes this style of cooking so enchanting. She goes with natural the flow of seasons (summer winter etc.) and believes in using products from nearby. A big naturally sustaining consumer attitude. Really more than just a cookbook. I would recommend this to anyone except that ultimately I find recipes a little hard to read just for the sake of reading. So in our society of fast satisfaction and only doing what you want to all the time it won't go for some people. It would be good for a person who is willing to put forth an effort in something a little difficult or mundane to get the whole good out of the book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I was sooooo excited to get my hands on this book due to its fantastic reviews. It is a gorgeous book and Amy's story seems fascinating. Sadly, this book is full of recipes that feel pretty impossible to me, even though I would consider myself to be a fairly experienced cook. Many ingredients are pricey and/or next to impossible to procure easily. It is too bad because I would love to branch even further into vegetarian cooking.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turznik

    I bought this book for my vegetarian daughter and son-in-law last month just as a little gift after finding it on Amazons Best of the Month list. Last night she came over and told me that nightly she picks up this cookbook to read and review recipes rather than reading her fiction books, she loves it so much. She told me that she has made several dishes for friends and everyone raves about them. I'd say, I hit a home run by buying this book for her!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Proia

    If I could give this book more than a five star review, I would. I am not vegetarian, but this is my go-to cookbook when I want incorporate more grains and vegetables in my family's diet. Her soup recipes, in particular, that use water as opposed to even a vegetable stock are absolutely delicious and dinner-party worthy. You won't be disappointed with this addition to your cookbook collection!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Gulotta

    Amy Chaplin makes wholesome ingredients accessible and beautiful. She makes a convincing case for simple preparation methods like grain soaking (something I've started doing enthusiastically!), and especially for vegetarians or people who enjoy eating lots of plant-based meals, her recipes will truly inspire.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mrspam4ever

    What a beautiful book from cover to cover. I cannot wait to try some of the recipes, but I will have to wait because I cataloged it into my library collection & it was checked out before it made it to the shelf:) I was so lucky to win this Goodreads giveaway & I know it will be a asset to our collection! What a beautiful book from cover to cover. I cannot wait to try some of the recipes, but I will have to wait because I cataloged it into my library collection & it was checked out before it made it to the shelf:) I was so lucky to win this Goodreads giveaway & I know it will be a asset to our collection!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    Got it at the library and have almost read every tantalizing recipe. However I can not renew it and fees are accruing so back it goes and I will have to get back on the request list to make some of these delightful dishes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    A beautiful book with helpful tips on stocking a whole foods pantry; features basic recipes you can use to create a week's worth of meals. Many of the recipes do look complicated, but this book will be worth a second look when I have more time to devote to cooking.

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