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State of the Unions: How Labor Can Strengthen the Middle Class, Improve Our Economy, and Regain Political Influence

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In the tradition of What's the Matter with Kansas? and Nickel and Dimed, this book is deep exploration of the transformative power of unions. Dine was nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize for his labor reporting and named top foreign correspondent by the Overseas Press Club. Dine's op-ed pieces have been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Po In the tradition of What's the Matter with Kansas? and Nickel and Dimed, this book is deep exploration of the transformative power of unions. Dine was nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize for his labor reporting and named top foreign correspondent by the Overseas Press Club. Dine's op-ed pieces have been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, and Newsday


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In the tradition of What's the Matter with Kansas? and Nickel and Dimed, this book is deep exploration of the transformative power of unions. Dine was nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize for his labor reporting and named top foreign correspondent by the Overseas Press Club. Dine's op-ed pieces have been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Po In the tradition of What's the Matter with Kansas? and Nickel and Dimed, this book is deep exploration of the transformative power of unions. Dine was nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize for his labor reporting and named top foreign correspondent by the Overseas Press Club. Dine's op-ed pieces have been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, and Newsday

46 review for State of the Unions: How Labor Can Strengthen the Middle Class, Improve Our Economy, and Regain Political Influence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Figueiredo

    Great read on unions in America. Goes a long way in dissecting the downward spiral of American labor, although I think it makes labor's revival seem easier than it will actually be. I really like Dine's use of anecdotes to show how labor can recover, but I wish there were more. All in all, an important read for those fascinated by organized labor. Great read on unions in America. Goes a long way in dissecting the downward spiral of American labor, although I think it makes labor's revival seem easier than it will actually be. I really like Dine's use of anecdotes to show how labor can recover, but I wish there were more. All in all, an important read for those fascinated by organized labor.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt Haynes

    A pretty good look at unions in America.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Dine pulls off an incredibly difficult feat: writing a book on the current shape of the labor movement that should interest and engage both proponents and critics of organized labor. And he does so by telling stories about unions and union members that even supporters of labor are often unfamiliar with. Dine's main point is that our entire conversation about unions in America is warped precisely because of our lack of familiarity with these stories. And what we need, more than anything, is for la Dine pulls off an incredibly difficult feat: writing a book on the current shape of the labor movement that should interest and engage both proponents and critics of organized labor. And he does so by telling stories about unions and union members that even supporters of labor are often unfamiliar with. Dine's main point is that our entire conversation about unions in America is warped precisely because of our lack of familiarity with these stories. And what we need, more than anything, is for labor to re-engage all of us with these, to tell its stories so that we understand once again that unions are not the corrupt bureaucracies of common legend. Unions are workers, the people carrying out the basic work that shapes life for all of us. And the quality of daily life for many people is eroding as the strength of unions erode. Much of the blame for this, though, Dine lays at the feet of unions themselves. And he doesn't shy away from also sharing tales about the uglier parts of organized labor (and it sounds like he's had some unfortunate run-ins with those parts himself). But once again, labor has left much of its story untold. Even in such infamous organizations at the Teamsters, the Hoffa legacy has been openly challenged and is beginning to fade. Yet the (increasingly successful) movements for union democratization, accompanied by large shifts in internal union structures, are something most of us don't read about on a regular basis. But Dine has provided us with a great chance to remedy that with this book - pick it up if you have the chance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence

    Another one read for professional reasons. Journalists usually seem to know how to tell a story in a compelling way. But I guess this book goes to show that not all can do so in a long format. There are a couple of real solid stories here, but he can't make effective use of the storytelling format to propel the remainder of the book. Too much repetition and unclear organization, overly long meandering sentences, and bad grammar and word choice. Also, I don't appreciate writers who insert themsel Another one read for professional reasons. Journalists usually seem to know how to tell a story in a compelling way. But I guess this book goes to show that not all can do so in a long format. There are a couple of real solid stories here, but he can't make effective use of the storytelling format to propel the remainder of the book. Too much repetition and unclear organization, overly long meandering sentences, and bad grammar and word choice. Also, I don't appreciate writers who insert themselves into the story just to move the story along or name drop as this one does. It's one thing to use your experience as an example to illustrate a point like he does when he discusses problems in communication strategies of unions. But it's an entirely irritating insertion of ego when you become the point of the tale - the Hoffa encounters, for example. Some interesting points to make about how unions could make themselves more relevant, but probably should not have evolved into a book length manuscript. Just because you might have a little something to say doesn't mean you should write a book to do so.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book speaks on the issues facing labor unions in America today. He manages to explain in a non patronizing tone the struggles and gains of the unions today. The claim of the book is to educate those unaware of the stories behind these unions and what they are capable of doing. I enjoyed this book. I used it in a book report and thought it helped form new opinions and educate those facing the battle of the union wars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  8. 5 out of 5

    Philip M.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cherlyn Acquista

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

  12. 5 out of 5

    Badger Bagbane

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian Wilcox

  14. 4 out of 5

    Claire Johnson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  16. 5 out of 5

    bluentity

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Simpson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Timothy McCluskey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Celeste Peterson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  21. 4 out of 5

    Martin J. Rafanan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dj Gillespie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Dine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Frank Piccioli

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  28. 4 out of 5

    Seth Morris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  32. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

  33. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  34. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  38. 5 out of 5

    John J.

  39. 4 out of 5

    Brian Cassidy

  40. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  41. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Hayden

  42. 5 out of 5

    Pantsless Progressive

  43. 4 out of 5

    Tin Doan

  44. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Anderstrom

  45. 4 out of 5

    Alisha

  46. 4 out of 5

    Monique LeTourneau Patel

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