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The Last Trail is the timeless classic western Adventure story by Zane Grey. It is an American Western Classic! After the American Revolution, Jonathan Zane became a celebrated scout on the frontier. His adventurous spirit and love of the wild led him to Fort Henry, scene of countless Indian attacks. Farmers had been murdered, women abducted, cabins burned. Zane teamed wit The Last Trail is the timeless classic western Adventure story by Zane Grey. It is an American Western Classic! After the American Revolution, Jonathan Zane became a celebrated scout on the frontier. His adventurous spirit and love of the wild led him to Fort Henry, scene of countless Indian attacks. Farmers had been murdered, women abducted, cabins burned. Zane teamed with legendary scout Lewis Wetzel to mete out justice to Indians and outlaws, and settlers began to enjoy the lush Ohio Valley in peace. One of Grey's most powerful and exciting novels ever! CONTENTS The Last Trail CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III . . . CHAPTER XXV ABOUT THE AUTHOR FREE AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOAD The Authorized The Last Trail - [ FREE AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ] for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for


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The Last Trail is the timeless classic western Adventure story by Zane Grey. It is an American Western Classic! After the American Revolution, Jonathan Zane became a celebrated scout on the frontier. His adventurous spirit and love of the wild led him to Fort Henry, scene of countless Indian attacks. Farmers had been murdered, women abducted, cabins burned. Zane teamed wit The Last Trail is the timeless classic western Adventure story by Zane Grey. It is an American Western Classic! After the American Revolution, Jonathan Zane became a celebrated scout on the frontier. His adventurous spirit and love of the wild led him to Fort Henry, scene of countless Indian attacks. Farmers had been murdered, women abducted, cabins burned. Zane teamed with legendary scout Lewis Wetzel to mete out justice to Indians and outlaws, and settlers began to enjoy the lush Ohio Valley in peace. One of Grey's most powerful and exciting novels ever! CONTENTS The Last Trail CHAPTER I CHAPTER II CHAPTER III . . . CHAPTER XXV ABOUT THE AUTHOR FREE AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOAD The Authorized The Last Trail - [ FREE AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ] for Kindle Edition offers reader special Kindle enabled features, including interactive table of contents.Easy to use table of contents take you right to the chapter and verse you are looking for

30 review for The Last Trail - [ FREE AUDIOBOOK DOWNLOAD ] [ ANNOTATED ]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    The Last Trail by Zane Grey is a good example of American literature written in the early part of the last century. Traditions and family values play a large part in daily life. This book distinguishes between two types of frontiersmen, the pioneers and the border men. The first being settlers that move west into the Ohio River valley and the second the men that made the area secure from outlaws and local indignant Indian warriors. Love plays a large role in this story as it has in many stories The Last Trail by Zane Grey is a good example of American literature written in the early part of the last century. Traditions and family values play a large part in daily life. This book distinguishes between two types of frontiersmen, the pioneers and the border men. The first being settlers that move west into the Ohio River valley and the second the men that made the area secure from outlaws and local indignant Indian warriors. Love plays a large role in this story as it has in many stories both then and now. The descriptions of the endless wilderness sometimes tend to be a little over-flowery but fits in the novel and don’t distract from the story. The reader can’t help to think that much of what is mentioned and described is true to life on the frontier during the first two decades of U.S. history. Although it is set in an earlier time then most of Grey’s other work, I highly recommend it to all lovers of classical American history.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    Zane Grey's work leaves me with a feeling of melancholy (in a good way). There is some romantic longing for a way of life which is long gone. Not that they were good old days--I think that life in the settlement days in Ohio were difficult, especially for women. Lots of hard work under poor conditions. Truly, I am glad to be a 21st century person--but the romance of Grey's writing always pulls at my heart strings.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rocky Ternal

    This is a great trilogy of adventure and life during the very early years of our country by Zane Grey. People generally think of the “West” as Texas, Wyoming, New Mexico, etc. but these pioneers had no less of a hard time opening up the boarders moving into West Virginia and Ohio. There were ruthless criminals and unfriendly Indians, wild animals and no law to protect them. Books like, the Leatherstocking Series (James Fenimoe Cooper) and the Sackets series (Louis L’Amour) give you a very vivid This is a great trilogy of adventure and life during the very early years of our country by Zane Grey. People generally think of the “West” as Texas, Wyoming, New Mexico, etc. but these pioneers had no less of a hard time opening up the boarders moving into West Virginia and Ohio. There were ruthless criminals and unfriendly Indians, wild animals and no law to protect them. Books like, the Leatherstocking Series (James Fenimoe Cooper) and the Sackets series (Louis L’Amour) give you a very vivid view of life “on the border” as they call it, during those early years.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    “Good morning, Colonel Zane, said Helen cheerily, coming into the yard where the colonel was at work. “Did Will come over this way?” “I reckon you’ll find him if you find Betty,” replied Colonel Zane dryly. “Come to think of it, that’s true,” Helen said, laughing. “I’ve a suspicion Will rn off from me this morning.” “He and Betty have gone off nutting.” Okay, so in contemporary idioms one would suspect that Colonel Zane just said something dirty about Betty and Will. But fear not. Because when “Good morning, Colonel Zane, said Helen cheerily, coming into the yard where the colonel was at work. “Did Will come over this way?” “I reckon you’ll find him if you find Betty,” replied Colonel Zane dryly. “Come to think of it, that’s true,” Helen said, laughing. “I’ve a suspicion Will rn off from me this morning.” “He and Betty have gone off nutting.” Okay, so in contemporary idioms one would suspect that Colonel Zane just said something dirty about Betty and Will. But fear not. Because when Zane Grey is really writing about sex, he uses hyphens as a euphemism. “Betty, who was in the sitting room, sprang up and cried: ‘Oh! Eb! Eb! Don’t say she’s ---.’” Now at this point Helen has been rescued by frontiersmen (Border Men in this text) after having been kidnapped by Indians and renegades. But a century ago, Zane Grey couldn’t use words like “raped” or “molested,” so he substituted hyphens. Fear not, gentle reader, we are soon reassured that Helen’s hyphen is intact. Zane Grey’s early trilogy of frontier life in the Ohio river valley is allegedly based on records of his ancestors, the founders of Zanesville Ohio. But he’s also borrowing heavily from James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales. I have to say, having read both, that Grey’s three novels in this vein hold up the best. (For a hilarious but accurate critique of Cooper, read Mark Twain’s essay “The Literary Offenses of Fenimore Cooper. I'm reminded of it because Grey's characters, also, are always stepping on twigs whenever "silence is worth two dollars a minute.") But Grey’s trilogy holds up pretty well. It’s dated, of course, but all three of these novels build nicely to exciting climaxes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    Frankly, I was surprised that I enjoyed The Last Trail so much. I have always thought of Grey as a man's writer so I was taken aback at the centrality of the romance in this book. Since it is vintage fiction, there are VERY negative stereotypes of American Indians and also the unfortunate use of the "n" word (once). But it was a rollicking good story. The women in the book are beautiful (but hardy) and teach Sunday School. The men cuss and kill injuns. But in spite of the stereotypes, the mild cu Frankly, I was surprised that I enjoyed The Last Trail so much. I have always thought of Grey as a man's writer so I was taken aback at the centrality of the romance in this book. Since it is vintage fiction, there are VERY negative stereotypes of American Indians and also the unfortunate use of the "n" word (once). But it was a rollicking good story. The women in the book are beautiful (but hardy) and teach Sunday School. The men cuss and kill injuns. But in spite of the stereotypes, the mild cussing, and the melodrama, I was hooked on the story from start to finish. Some of the dialogue is laugh out loud funny. Good vacation reading. And free on Kindle.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harold Carlson

    I have never read a Zane Grey book before and I have to say that I really enjoyed it. It is also a genre that I have never read before. I enjoyed the story, the characters, his writing style and how real the story seemed as I was reading it. I am looking forward to reading more books by this author.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barbra Campbell

    Thoroughly enjoyed it., Thoroughly enjoyed it., Haven't read Zane Gray in years. This book was like getting reacquainted with an old friend. Highly recommend to anyone who likes to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Lee Wood

    THE OHIO VALLEY SETTLEMENT All I will say is that this part of American history is nothing but hardships and misery. At least this action packed Zane Grey exploits of settling the Ohio Valley, especially around Fort Henry was a blood bath. Settlers were killed/murdered by both unsavory whites and possibly rogue Native Americans, which they weren't referred as but as "savages. So the push farther West by pioneers searching/looking to live free to raise a family, or even become a WEALTH rancher. Th THE OHIO VALLEY SETTLEMENT All I will say is that this part of American history is nothing but hardships and misery. At least this action packed Zane Grey exploits of settling the Ohio Valley, especially around Fort Henry was a blood bath. Settlers were killed/murdered by both unsavory whites and possibly rogue Native Americans, which they weren't referred as but as "savages. So the push farther West by pioneers searching/looking to live free to raise a family, or even become a WEALTH rancher. There were the ambushers, human trafficking and just outright murder, this story seems to emphasize how men became protectors of the innocent. These men were "bordermen" who sacrificed their lives to keep these settlers and wagon trains safe from the hoodlums who skunked around forests, you know folks mostly men who lived on the margins of society..not good, but that's life. The illustrations throughout this book are beautiful, they show all the different dress and situations they faced. There are Native Americans scenes, The fighting Calvary. This young United States has both a dark side and to move forward with a solid determination for improvement. Can't best that folks..right??

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Set in the Ohio Valley, just as white settlers were beginning to come together in small settlements near military forts. This was "The West" at the time, and there were skirmishes with Indians and with bad white guys as well. The story revolves around a 16 year old "woman" ("We like to get them married young out here, to build up the population"), who moved into the settlement with her father and cousin. Of course she was beautiful ("those big eyes!"), spunky, and brave. She fell for the strong, Set in the Ohio Valley, just as white settlers were beginning to come together in small settlements near military forts. This was "The West" at the time, and there were skirmishes with Indians and with bad white guys as well. The story revolves around a 16 year old "woman" ("We like to get them married young out here, to build up the population"), who moved into the settlement with her father and cousin. Of course she was beautiful ("those big eyes!"), spunky, and brave. She fell for the strong, silent borderman, who patrolled the borders of the settlement, trying to keep the settlers safe. He was married to his job, and so seemed to take little notice of her, though all of the other young fellers around vied vigorously for her attention. Plenty of tracking, skulking, shooting, and wonderful descriptions of the forest, streams, sunsets, and cliffs. First published in 1909. I downloaded this book for free from LibriVox.org. It was read beautifully by a talented reader.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richard Koerner

    I find it of interest that a book like this isn’t better well known. Zane Grey was a very important author for a long, long time. His depiction of life in a different era of our country is fascinating and useful to us as we attempt to move forward. The frontier of the United States and its settlement plays an important part in who we are and what our culture is. This book is the third of a trilogy of the settlement of my home state of Ohio and I found it fascinating. I am reading in e-book forma I find it of interest that a book like this isn’t better well known. Zane Grey was a very important author for a long, long time. His depiction of life in a different era of our country is fascinating and useful to us as we attempt to move forward. The frontier of the United States and its settlement plays an important part in who we are and what our culture is. This book is the third of a trilogy of the settlement of my home state of Ohio and I found it fascinating. I am reading in e-book format and the digitization sometimes causes mistakes that are found in the text. The prose is very good. The depictions of the characters are not like those we find today, but nonetheless are interesting and the overall read is highly entertaining to me and keeps me turning those pages.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Abrille

    This story will give you a peek and an idea what it was like to live in the frontier era when settlers were migrating to the west coast to start a new life. The story will burn you out because too many characters were involved and the story moved like a driver in front of you who constantly drives the speed limit, then speeds up for minute and then slows down and repeats the cycle in a perpetual loop, every chapter was like that and became painfully boring. What you'll learn that frontier life w This story will give you a peek and an idea what it was like to live in the frontier era when settlers were migrating to the west coast to start a new life. The story will burn you out because too many characters were involved and the story moved like a driver in front of you who constantly drives the speed limit, then speeds up for minute and then slows down and repeats the cycle in a perpetual loop, every chapter was like that and became painfully boring. What you'll learn that frontier life was indeed boring. Pickup another book, this one will kill your enthusiasm like reading a Tolstoy book where the story painfully keeps dragging to death.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peg Lotvin

    I love Grey's description of the natural world. His rendering of a wooded glade with mosses and ferns surrounding a babbling brook or a natural pond are sweet and believable. His descriptions of human interaction is often laughable. The merest glance between two young people has them in love and ready to marry. Maybe that's the way it was in the late 1700s and early 1800s.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    The third volume in Grey's Ohio River trilogy, Set in the late 18th century when the frontier of white settlement was at what is now western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio. Times were dangerous with conflict between whites and Indians. Based on actual events involving the Zane family that the author was descended from.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jay Wright

    This is the third book in a series. It is about the Zane family living in Ohio, next to the Ohio River. The Bordermen have their hands full with theft and kidnappings. The Indian raids are grabbing both stock, killing people, and kidnapping women. The book contains a love story also. I enjoyed this book of the early West (just after the Revolution).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This is the final book in Zane Grey's Ohio River trilogy. I think I like these books better than Grey's Westerns, because they are based around actual historical figures, who were Grey's family ancestors.

  16. 5 out of 5

    derek arthur howard

    good story of old fort and family and men and women who had testing times with stolen horses,outlaws ,border men trying to find those responsable ,slow to follow book but worth reading,recommend.............

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bill Hooten

    What love will do to a man! Jonathan Zane finds out in this last of the Ohio trilogy. Good story, and again Grey goes all out (may be even overboard) on the description of the country. Really enjoyable read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    D. Norman

    A beautifully written love story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor Heise

    The Last Trail Interesting concept on how the west was tamed. Didn't care for the attitude of the Indians. They were taken advantage of at that time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deelighted

    Bit disappointed that the novel took place in the Wheeling area and not the Ohio Territory.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A nice, easy to read frontier book from a forgotten time when chivalry reigned.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Nice second story (yes, I know it's the third, but to me currently, it's the second). Good characters and action. I get the feeling I've read it before.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    2.5 stars

  24. 4 out of 5

    Burke F. Ray

    Great! You should try,but it's still not sure you will have the opportunity to get ahead of Zane. He add Louis are my favorite Authors.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tony Ritchie

    Awesome book Awesome good great wonderful winner onekof Zane Greys best books. Will probably read again in the future. A excellent story

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Once you get used to Mr. Gray's style of writing it is a good read. Old fashioned western with a hint of romance and humor. I recommend this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ronald L Brown

    Another great story In a most beautiful way Grey described the harsh realities of early Pioneer life. It's something we must appreciate and be thankful for.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Frumenty

    I fear I may have spoiled Zane Grey for myself by reading the best book first. I've read Riders of the purple sage, then The call of the canyon, and now The last trail. The quality has been in steady decline. Grey's main failing, to my mind, is his inability to create characters that speak for themselves. The protagonists of his novels are not observed so much as constructed to fit a moral framework that the reader is then pressured to apply to the events described. Characters have all the appea I fear I may have spoiled Zane Grey for myself by reading the best book first. I've read Riders of the purple sage, then The call of the canyon, and now The last trail. The quality has been in steady decline. Grey's main failing, to my mind, is his inability to create characters that speak for themselves. The protagonists of his novels are not observed so much as constructed to fit a moral framework that the reader is then pressured to apply to the events described. Characters have all the appearance of actors from Central Casting: the leading men are pure, taciturn (perhaps nursing some deep hurt), mature and strong; the leading women are pure, loving, wise and resilient; there are dastardly villains, cold and dangerous but outwardly civil, or coarse and dissipated; villains with a sad history who may be redeemed at the last moment; and plenty of quaint and benign subsidiary characters. That is to say, all the clichés of the Hollywood Western genre which owes so much to Grey's fiction. One saving grace of The last trail is that Grey writes about nature in a genuinely appreciative way. Of course I can't test his knowledge of botany and natural history, since I've lived most of life in Australia and have never experienced the environment which he describes, but an undeniably strong sense of the natural world pervades the book. From biographical information it is plain that Grey was a man who travelled much in the wilder parts of the United States and knew the territory about which he wrote. His characters know the woods and the seasons and their knowledge informs their actions: "Bad time fer us, when the birds are so tame an' chipper. We can't put faith in them these days," said Wetzel. "Seems like they never was wild. I can tell, 'cept at this season, by the way they whistle an' act in the woods, if there's been any Injuns on the trails." The main action of The last trail is carried out by two "bordermen", Jonathon Zane and Lew Wetzel, who live hard lives on the trail, celibate as monks, for the sake of their calling, which is quite simply Indian-hunting (Indian-killing). Grey makes no excuses for the bordermen. The frontier must be cleared of its native inhabitants so God-fearing settlers can sleep safe in their beds, and readers must accept that as a given and enjoy the adventure. The native Americans are variously described as "the foes of civilization", "murderous", "red devils", and "fiendish". Their physicality is often praised ("the supple body peculiar to the savage"), and their courage is noted, but their hearts are invariably black: "Sinewy, muscular warriors they were, [...]. At first glance their dark faces and dark eyes were expressive of craft, cunning, cruelty and courage, all attributes of the savage." Their extermination is nothing more than a necessity. I think most modern readers would be uncomfortable with this, as I am. James Fenimore-Cooper's Leatherstocking novels present a much more nuanced and thoughtful outlook on the first Americans; not PC enough for some readers perhaps, but he engaged intelligently with the issue and his attitudes are still generally defensible today. The moral world of Grey's fiction is served up cut and dried: there are hard-working God-fearing Christian folk, many who have lost their way through drink or bad company (some of whom can be set back on the right path by the love of a good woman), the wicked and depraved, a few friendly or Christian Indians and lastly the heathen Indian who is scarcely human at all. Grey never preaches. Christian values just appear to be the only good values that he can conceive of, and thus so axiomatic that they need not be mentioned. I don't recommend The last trail. If you want to try Zane Grey, read Riders of the purple sage. That, with Mormons and rustlers for villains instead of Indians and renegades, is a much better novel.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yume Kitasei

    It's a shame: I can see how this once was a classic. The story is exciting and the writing skillful. But the characterizations and morality are so horribly outdated, I found this very difficult to get through. The heroine is ridiculous, self-centered, selfish, and silly, and the hero is basically a mass murderer of Indians. The Last Trail follows a girl who moves out west (Ohio-ish) with her father and cousin to start a new life after one of her many obsessed suitors lost most of her father's mon It's a shame: I can see how this once was a classic. The story is exciting and the writing skillful. But the characterizations and morality are so horribly outdated, I found this very difficult to get through. The heroine is ridiculous, self-centered, selfish, and silly, and the hero is basically a mass murderer of Indians. The Last Trail follows a girl who moves out west (Ohio-ish) with her father and cousin to start a new life after one of her many obsessed suitors lost most of her father's money. They are taken under wing by Colonel Zane, who is a matchmaker - mostly because he's obsessed with multiplying the pioneer population as fast as possible to settle the land. He decides to hitch the girl to his brother, a "borderman" aka the guy who runs around in the woods killing Indians skillfully with (at least it seemed) very little provocation. Meanwhile, horses and wenches are stolen, tavern brawls break out, ridiculously ill-advised flower-picking happens, bad outlaws fall in love with the heroine and are spurned, and her old suitor shows up again. If nothing else, this book was a good reminder of how the west was really "won", and how okay with that most people were until recently.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joleen

    Fort Henry is the base location of these three Zane Grey novels (Betty Zane, The Spirit of the Border and The Last Trail). Time period was late 1700’s and the days were filled with animosity between the settlers and Indians. Bordermen were scouts who patrolled all over the area to keep the Indians, renegades and outlaws away. Their method was simply to kill. Rare was an Indian they did not shoot on the spot. Colonel Ebenezer Zane was in charge of the fort. Family with him was Jonathan Zane, his b Fort Henry is the base location of these three Zane Grey novels (Betty Zane, The Spirit of the Border and The Last Trail). Time period was late 1700’s and the days were filled with animosity between the settlers and Indians. Bordermen were scouts who patrolled all over the area to keep the Indians, renegades and outlaws away. Their method was simply to kill. Rare was an Indian they did not shoot on the spot. Colonel Ebenezer Zane was in charge of the fort. Family with him was Jonathan Zane, his borderman brother, Betty Zane, their sister, Isaac Zane, their brother, although he's mostly in the first book, and Jim Wetzel, a close friend and the greatest borderman, of the stuff legends are made. In this book another traveling pioneer family has arrived, and Helen, a young woman with the most amazing eyes catches the attention of Jonathan, a confirmed borderman with no time nor inclination toward romance. This book has the best chases, fights and constant conflict. But there's a sensitive story mixed in that will appeal to many. The language of the first two books was old....and to be honest it was just as old in this one, but by the third, you get used to it and overlook how strange it is.

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