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Managing Expectations: Working with People Who Want More, Better, Faster, Sooner, NOW! (Dorset House eBooks)

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People have expectations. Your clients, for example. Sometimes their expectations of you seem unreasonable. Sometimes your expectations of them seem just as unreasonable (in their eyes).The problem is that these mismatched expectations can lead to misunderstandings, frayed nerves, and ruffled feathers. More seriously, they often lead to flawed systems, failed projects, and People have expectations. Your clients, for example. Sometimes their expectations of you seem unreasonable. Sometimes your expectations of them seem just as unreasonable (in their eyes).The problem is that these mismatched expectations can lead to misunderstandings, frayed nerves, and ruffled feathers. More seriously, they often lead to flawed systems, failed projects, and a drain on resources. Left unmet, customer expectations can destroy the success of our products and services. Managing Expectations shows how to identify expectations and suggests ways to gain more control of them. In today's turbulent business world, understanding and meeting your customers' expectations is indeed a challenge, and it's not hard to understand why: Expectations affect a range of interactions, including service responsiveness, service capability, product functionality, and project success. Expectations are difficult to control and impossible to turn off. However, by learning to identify and influence what your customers expect, you can dramatically improve the quality, impact, and effectiveness of your services. Contents include sections on communication skills, information gathering, policies and practices, building win-win relationships, as well as a concluding chapter on how to formulate an action plan.


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People have expectations. Your clients, for example. Sometimes their expectations of you seem unreasonable. Sometimes your expectations of them seem just as unreasonable (in their eyes).The problem is that these mismatched expectations can lead to misunderstandings, frayed nerves, and ruffled feathers. More seriously, they often lead to flawed systems, failed projects, and People have expectations. Your clients, for example. Sometimes their expectations of you seem unreasonable. Sometimes your expectations of them seem just as unreasonable (in their eyes).The problem is that these mismatched expectations can lead to misunderstandings, frayed nerves, and ruffled feathers. More seriously, they often lead to flawed systems, failed projects, and a drain on resources. Left unmet, customer expectations can destroy the success of our products and services. Managing Expectations shows how to identify expectations and suggests ways to gain more control of them. In today's turbulent business world, understanding and meeting your customers' expectations is indeed a challenge, and it's not hard to understand why: Expectations affect a range of interactions, including service responsiveness, service capability, product functionality, and project success. Expectations are difficult to control and impossible to turn off. However, by learning to identify and influence what your customers expect, you can dramatically improve the quality, impact, and effectiveness of your services. Contents include sections on communication skills, information gathering, policies and practices, building win-win relationships, as well as a concluding chapter on how to formulate an action plan.

30 review for Managing Expectations: Working with People Who Want More, Better, Faster, Sooner, NOW! (Dorset House eBooks)

  1. 4 out of 5

    John

    The corporate jargon is a bit annoying and can sometimes make the book hard to read but the lessons included were invaluable. This book provided me with my first dive into critical thinking. What you need to understand is that this book isn't simply for someone in the corporate world, it is a philosophical doctrine that can be used consistently in everyday life; of course, you have to read between the lines a bit. I read this in High School and upon repeated reflection my social skills and effic The corporate jargon is a bit annoying and can sometimes make the book hard to read but the lessons included were invaluable. This book provided me with my first dive into critical thinking. What you need to understand is that this book isn't simply for someone in the corporate world, it is a philosophical doctrine that can be used consistently in everyday life; of course, you have to read between the lines a bit. I read this in High School and upon repeated reflection my social skills and efficiency gained drastically. I still use the lessons I learned from this book quite heavily. Anyone that hears me talk about how so much boils down to your expectations clashing against those of others will see how much influence this book had on me. The book revolves around three things: Communication - Understanding how you present yourself; being accomodating and clear with your intentions. Information Gathering - Getting the facts and making sure the 'facts' you get are accurate. Policies and Practices - Setting a structure to get things done in an efficient manner without convolution. One major criticism and HUGE irony in this book is that Naomi discusses alienating a particular audience with technical jargon, yet this book is JAM-PACKED with corporate buzzwords and jargon. If Naomi were to re-word this book, I think it could reach a much larger audience.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hom Sack

    Still a great read after 14 years. It was not only useful in my career but also in my personal relationship with people. One great surprising takeaway is that "under promise but over deliver" is not always the best policy. At least not all the time. Still a great read after 14 years. It was not only useful in my career but also in my personal relationship with people. One great surprising takeaway is that "under promise but over deliver" is not always the best policy. At least not all the time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy Wendland

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Entwistle

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Petrzelka

  7. 4 out of 5

    laurent decorps

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  9. 5 out of 5

    yasmeen kashef

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

  11. 4 out of 5

    kar-kar

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gina Alexan

  14. 4 out of 5

    ReadKing

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lou Lione

  16. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scuppers

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martine Devos

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kris

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nynke Fokma

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina Rebello

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

  25. 4 out of 5

    S Searle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gerald

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  29. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

  30. 5 out of 5

    James

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