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Missionary Conquest: The Gospel and Native American Cultural Genocide

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This fascinating probe into U.S. mission history spotlights four cases: Junipero Serra, the Franciscan whose mission to California natives has made him a candidate for sainthood; John Eliot, the renowned Puritan missionary to Massachusetts Indians; Pierre-Jean De Smet, the Jesuit missioner to the Indians of the Midwest; and Henry Benjamin Whipple, who engineered the U.S. g This fascinating probe into U.S. mission history spotlights four cases: Junipero Serra, the Franciscan whose mission to California natives has made him a candidate for sainthood; John Eliot, the renowned Puritan missionary to Massachusetts Indians; Pierre-Jean De Smet, the Jesuit missioner to the Indians of the Midwest; and Henry Benjamin Whipple, who engineered the U.S. government's theft of the Black Hills from the Sioux.


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This fascinating probe into U.S. mission history spotlights four cases: Junipero Serra, the Franciscan whose mission to California natives has made him a candidate for sainthood; John Eliot, the renowned Puritan missionary to Massachusetts Indians; Pierre-Jean De Smet, the Jesuit missioner to the Indians of the Midwest; and Henry Benjamin Whipple, who engineered the U.S. g This fascinating probe into U.S. mission history spotlights four cases: Junipero Serra, the Franciscan whose mission to California natives has made him a candidate for sainthood; John Eliot, the renowned Puritan missionary to Massachusetts Indians; Pierre-Jean De Smet, the Jesuit missioner to the Indians of the Midwest; and Henry Benjamin Whipple, who engineered the U.S. government's theft of the Black Hills from the Sioux.

30 review for Missionary Conquest: The Gospel and Native American Cultural Genocide

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    One might be tempted to write these stories off (collusion by missionaries as a means to subdue Native Americans) as ancient history, but the effects are long lasting, even into the 21st century. And as a person who works with a group of Native Americans in Central America, so much of what Tinker writes about as having occurred centuries before in the USA continues to occur with them. The book is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in an honest assessment of missionary activities in western One might be tempted to write these stories off (collusion by missionaries as a means to subdue Native Americans) as ancient history, but the effects are long lasting, even into the 21st century. And as a person who works with a group of Native Americans in Central America, so much of what Tinker writes about as having occurred centuries before in the USA continues to occur with them. The book is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in an honest assessment of missionary activities in western Christian history. Paying special attention to the ways that culture influences--not for the good--our interpretation of God and Scripture. This is something we continue to struggle with today, and it is only by honestly assessing our collective efforts of the past and present that we will have a hope of being a positive transformational presence in the future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    Must read for church goers/affiliated. Helpful to remember and reflect on the effect of not being aware.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Gorman

    George E. Tinker, a Native American theologian, argues that Christian missionaries perpetrated cultural genocide upon North America’s native peoples, so that the Gospel became a cloak for Euro-American economics, culture, and politics. He writes not only to give a historical exposé of missionaries like Bartolomé de las Casas, Junípero Serra, and John Eliot, but also to help Native American Christians decolonize their religious faith. Tinker shows briefly but thoroughly how Eliot supported the Pu George E. Tinker, a Native American theologian, argues that Christian missionaries perpetrated cultural genocide upon North America’s native peoples, so that the Gospel became a cloak for Euro-American economics, culture, and politics. He writes not only to give a historical exposé of missionaries like Bartolomé de las Casas, Junípero Serra, and John Eliot, but also to help Native American Christians decolonize their religious faith. Tinker shows briefly but thoroughly how Eliot supported the Puritan government, how Serra ruled like a dictator in California, how Pierre-Jean De Smet allied with trappers and failed to communicate with Native Americans, and how Henry Benjamin Whipple helped the U.S. government take away Sioux lands. Ultimately, Tinker wants white Americans to see that these missionaries’ good intentions still decimated native cultures, and he wants Native Americans to reject missionary/colonial assumptions, which have even infiltrated revisionist New Age religions. (Tinker sees community as a major part of native culture traditionally, whereas white-led New Age movements stress individualism.) This is powerful, well-researched stuff; one wishes it was longer and explored more historical anecdotes than simply four biographies.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana Biggs

    This is essentially a text book - well written, well researched - but not much I didn't already know. That doesn't make it a bad book, just wasn't too excited about it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Gayle Reed

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roger Green

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ka

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Rindfleisch

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terry Wildman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kimpan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Laminack

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Whitaker

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zach Pattison

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Heine merchant

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  19. 5 out of 5

    Henry Matthews

  20. 4 out of 5

    Viviana E. Cornejo

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Slusarski

  22. 5 out of 5

    AURA A

  23. 5 out of 5

    Branka

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Black

  25. 5 out of 5

    James Stripes

  26. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Pitkin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Green

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Booher

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ross Whiteaker

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christina

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