counter create hit Blood on the Water - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Blood on the Water

Availability: Ready to download

As her New York Times bestselling novels always remind us, Anne Perry is a matchless guide to both the splendor and the shame of the British Empire at the height of its influence. In her twentieth William Monk mystery, she brings us to London’s grand Mayfair mansions, where the arrogant masters of the Western world hold sway—and to the teeming Thames waterfront, where one As her New York Times bestselling novels always remind us, Anne Perry is a matchless guide to both the splendor and the shame of the British Empire at the height of its influence. In her twentieth William Monk mystery, she brings us to London’s grand Mayfair mansions, where the arrogant masters of the Western world hold sway—and to the teeming Thames waterfront, where one summer afternoon, Monk witnesses the horrifying explosion of the pleasure boat Princess Mary, which sends to their deaths nearly two hundred merrymakers. The tragedy is no accident. As commander of the River Police, Monk should handle the case, but the investigation is turned over to the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. An Egyptian man is swiftly caught, tried, and sentenced to die. But almost as quickly, Monk presents evidence that Habib Beshara, though a nasty piece of work, was elsewhere at the time of the blast. The investigation, now in complete disarray, is hastily turned over to Monk. Is the crime connected with the soon-to-be-opened Suez Canal, which will enormously benefit wealthy British shipping companies? Or did all of those innocent people drown to ensure the death of just one? How did the bomber board the ship, and how did he manage to escape? Is he an anarchist or a madman? Backed up by his astute wife, Hester, and his old reliable friend Oliver Rathbone, Monk vows to find answers—but instead finds himself treading the dangerous waters of international intrigue, his questions politely turned aside by a formidable array of the powerful and privileged. Events twist and turn like the Thames itself, leading to the shattering moment when Monk realizes, perhaps too late, that he is the next target.


Compare
Ads Banner

As her New York Times bestselling novels always remind us, Anne Perry is a matchless guide to both the splendor and the shame of the British Empire at the height of its influence. In her twentieth William Monk mystery, she brings us to London’s grand Mayfair mansions, where the arrogant masters of the Western world hold sway—and to the teeming Thames waterfront, where one As her New York Times bestselling novels always remind us, Anne Perry is a matchless guide to both the splendor and the shame of the British Empire at the height of its influence. In her twentieth William Monk mystery, she brings us to London’s grand Mayfair mansions, where the arrogant masters of the Western world hold sway—and to the teeming Thames waterfront, where one summer afternoon, Monk witnesses the horrifying explosion of the pleasure boat Princess Mary, which sends to their deaths nearly two hundred merrymakers. The tragedy is no accident. As commander of the River Police, Monk should handle the case, but the investigation is turned over to the commissioner of the Metropolitan Police. An Egyptian man is swiftly caught, tried, and sentenced to die. But almost as quickly, Monk presents evidence that Habib Beshara, though a nasty piece of work, was elsewhere at the time of the blast. The investigation, now in complete disarray, is hastily turned over to Monk. Is the crime connected with the soon-to-be-opened Suez Canal, which will enormously benefit wealthy British shipping companies? Or did all of those innocent people drown to ensure the death of just one? How did the bomber board the ship, and how did he manage to escape? Is he an anarchist or a madman? Backed up by his astute wife, Hester, and his old reliable friend Oliver Rathbone, Monk vows to find answers—but instead finds himself treading the dangerous waters of international intrigue, his questions politely turned aside by a formidable array of the powerful and privileged. Events twist and turn like the Thames itself, leading to the shattering moment when Monk realizes, perhaps too late, that he is the next target.

30 review for Blood on the Water

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I hate to give a favorite author just two stars, but this seemed to cover the same old ground, didn't offer any character development for Hester, Monk, etc., and once again spent too much time in a courtroom. By the end, I didn't much care who the murderer was, which is never good for a mystery!

  2. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: Monk leaned forward, resting on his oar for a moment as he stared across the water at the Pool of London William Monk, head of the Thames Police Force, witnesses the explosion and sinking of a pleasure boat which results in the death of nearly 200 people. Almost immediately, as he and his men start their investigation, the case is removed from them and given to the regular land police. A man is accused, tried and found guilty, all on circumstantial evidence and with no motive giv First Sentence: Monk leaned forward, resting on his oar for a moment as he stared across the water at the Pool of London William Monk, head of the Thames Police Force, witnesses the explosion and sinking of a pleasure boat which results in the death of nearly 200 people. Almost immediately, as he and his men start their investigation, the case is removed from them and given to the regular land police. A man is accused, tried and found guilty, all on circumstantial evidence and with no motive given. The man’s sentence is stayed due to his illness, which also strikes Monk as questionable. With Hester’s help, Monk regains control of the investigation, with nearly fatal results. Perry is such a fine writer. Her descriptions are wonderfully evocative as we begin with a tranquil scene on the Thames. She then immediately changes the entire mood and secures your involvement in the story with a terrible event. Perry takes us into the environment of every level of society; from the lowest to the highest, and makes each real and understandable. The characters are each fully drawn and dimensional. In spite of this being the 20th book in the series, new readers are given a clear understanding of the characters, their backgrounds and their interrelationships. Long-time readers see how the characters have developed, grown—some literally—and how their lives have changed. We even have the introduction of a new, young character one hopes will remain in the series. Although Monk is the protagonist, there is an excellent balance in the use of characters, drawing upon the strength of each, including Hester’s background as a nurse during the Crimean War, Rathbone as a former barrister and judge, Scruff as a former mudlark, and Crow as an unlicensed doctor. Ms. Perry’s voice is captivating. Her dialogue is natural and, occasionally, humorous. Determining the fate of Worm, an urchin and mudlark found by Scruff, himself a former mudlark who adopted himself to the Monks, is a charming interlude. The plot is compelling. That Ms. Perry includes the trial into the final resolution of the mystery is something particularly interesting, demonstrating that the mystery isn’t solved until the guilty is brought to justice. “Blood on the Water” is an excellent book with highs and lows, drama, excitement, and suspense. This is yet another wonderful book by Ms. Perry. BLOOD ON THE WATER (Hist Mys-William Monk/Hester-London-Victorian) – VG+ Perry, Anne – 20th in series Ballantine Book – 2014

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen A. Wyle

    I like this series enough that I've continued to read it even as I found the quality declining somewhat. The key characters are well conceived and three-dimensional; I always enjoy returning to their world. This time around, I particularly enjoyed the attention to the fallibility of eyewitness testimony and the dangers of relying on it, especially in an emotionally charged case. I was also glad to see so much of Scuff, a relative latecomer to the series and one of my favorites. I did find the book I like this series enough that I've continued to read it even as I found the quality declining somewhat. The key characters are well conceived and three-dimensional; I always enjoy returning to their world. This time around, I particularly enjoyed the attention to the fallibility of eyewitness testimony and the dangers of relying on it, especially in an emotionally charged case. I was also glad to see so much of Scuff, a relative latecomer to the series and one of my favorites. I did find the book somewhat repetitive. Several points about the key situation were made over and over by one character or another.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    When Monk witnesses, at close hand, a pleasure boat sinking in the Thames, he and the others on the river spent hours rescuing the few survivors, knowing that there was no chance for those below decks or the women in heavy dresses. He naturally expects the case to be assigned to the River Police; after all, it's in their jurisdiction and they have far more experience than the relatively-new Metropolitan Police, yet politics intervene and soon the uproar surrounding the trial is too great to cont When Monk witnesses, at close hand, a pleasure boat sinking in the Thames, he and the others on the river spent hours rescuing the few survivors, knowing that there was no chance for those below decks or the women in heavy dresses. He naturally expects the case to be assigned to the River Police; after all, it's in their jurisdiction and they have far more experience than the relatively-new Metropolitan Police, yet politics intervene and soon the uproar surrounding the trial is too great to continue. When the alleged criminal is convicted and then saved days before death, the public's ire is almost too great. Amidst other fears, it appears that the man charged may not have been the bomber, and soon the mishandled case is back in Monk's hands. Monk is now left with a messy investigation, and an almost impossible task: to prove that, despite the original farce of a trial, the English justice system is still working and that they got the right man. The plot, set in Victorian London, seems strangely relevant today. As always, Perry demonstrates a fine understanding of the ethics behind some legal decisions: Is it more important just to get the right man, or to get him the right way? Should we do everything possible to find a criminal, even if affects an innocent man? Should corruption be exposed, if it causes a loss of confidence in the justice system? Hester's patient teachings to Scruff explain some of the complexities of these decisions, as Scruff - and Monk - ask themselves and others the awkward questions. What really carries the book is the discussion of teamwork. This isn't one where the lead character knows everything and does everything. The truth is pieced together by Monk with help from Hester, Orme, Scruff, and Rathbone, each of whom is conflicted, torn between honor and loyalty to friends, family, the system, the country. When the final pieces come together, it's almost unbearable, the depth and simultaneous pettiness of the tragedy is so great. An incredible read. Disclaimer: I received a free ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mickey Hoffman

    This book felt tired, if books can really feel at all. The characters all did what I expected them to do and I tired of the author's overuse of presenting their thoughts as questions.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol Clabo

    First time ever, I quit reading an Anne Perry book without finishing it. As mentioned by others, this just did not hold much interest. Yes, as always, her characters and setting are compelling. But the plot was, in a word, boring. But my real issues with Anne Perry's most recent books are twofold: 1. Repetitive preachiness! While in the past I have enjoyed her exposing the vices of the Victorian era (many of those vices continuing to be relevant today), she seems to doubt we will get the point if First time ever, I quit reading an Anne Perry book without finishing it. As mentioned by others, this just did not hold much interest. Yes, as always, her characters and setting are compelling. But the plot was, in a word, boring. But my real issues with Anne Perry's most recent books are twofold: 1. Repetitive preachiness! While in the past I have enjoyed her exposing the vices of the Victorian era (many of those vices continuing to be relevant today), she seems to doubt we will get the point if it is not reiterated on almost every page. In the current book, this means multiple characters describing the flaws of eyewitness testimony in nearly identical words, over and over again. Please, I get it! I have noticed this repetiveness increasingly over the past few books. 2. Conspiracies have taken over....every plot must involve a conspiracy that reaches to the highest levels of society and goverment. An occasional conspiracy is fine......it can then be unexpected, but every time? To be fair, I must say this has been a trend for other mystery writers in the past few years. I wish they would all quit falling back on conspiracies as an overused plot device. To sum up, in the past Anne Perry's plots were sufficiently interesting to keep me reading, even as I gritted my teeth over preachiness, and conspiracies. This time, no. I can't even say why. I just realized I had no particular interest in the solution to the mystery.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Grusing

    I do enjoy and own most of her Monk and Pitt books. It seems she sometimes repeats what is known more times than needed to fill some pages. In this book, much happens on the last few pages that she could have used more words in detailing. Also a little follow up might have been satisfying. After spending pages in court, it would have been nice to read how the case was completed. I assume Rathbone's newest interest will be featured in books to follow. I hope that the details of what becomes of Yo I do enjoy and own most of her Monk and Pitt books. It seems she sometimes repeats what is known more times than needed to fill some pages. In this book, much happens on the last few pages that she could have used more words in detailing. Also a little follow up might have been satisfying. After spending pages in court, it would have been nice to read how the case was completed. I assume Rathbone's newest interest will be featured in books to follow. I hope that the details of what becomes of York, Pryor and others may have some coverage.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katherina

    I like Anne Perry, I really do, but I couldn’t get into the book. After reading the first chapter, I had to force myself to read the second and then gave up. It feels weird to say the book was so slow considering the first chapter deals with the boat explosion, but it absolutely had no page-turner-effect on me. Hopefully my next Anne Perry will capture me as usual.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    2/3 to 3/4 of this book was excellent. The last 3rd or so with the introduction of the second trial is where my appreciation for the book fell off for me somewhat. I can understand the author wanting to ensure some story time for Rathbone but in this case I felt turning the focus of the story from Hester and Monk to Rathbone took away the intrigue and flow. A compelling plot unfolds starting with the explosion on board a pleasure boat on the Thames (the Princess Mary) causing the death of over 1 2/3 to 3/4 of this book was excellent. The last 3rd or so with the introduction of the second trial is where my appreciation for the book fell off for me somewhat. I can understand the author wanting to ensure some story time for Rathbone but in this case I felt turning the focus of the story from Hester and Monk to Rathbone took away the intrigue and flow. A compelling plot unfolds starting with the explosion on board a pleasure boat on the Thames (the Princess Mary) causing the death of over 170 people on board... modern-day terror in Victorian times... fabulous. Monk, being head of the River Police witnesses the explosion and gets involved in the investigation until suddenly, without warning he’s pulled off the case and it’s reassigned to the Metropolitan police. Needless to say, the investigation, arrest and subsequent trial all get botched and Monk is pulled in again to clean up the mess. Astutely, he soon realizes that there may be more to this unfortunate compromising of the case than pure incompetence and then turns his eye to uncover how deep the corruption and cover-up goes. Hester and Scuff both play key roles in the story and the investigation and it’s great to see how that little family unit of the three of them has developed. An enjoyable and satisfying read overall.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gerry Welsch

    I picked this book up randomly from the New Books display at the library. I liked it very much. I apparently jumped into the middle of a series about a law officer in London in the 1860s. William Monk and his wife Hester are likeable, interesting characters. Between Monk in the 1860s and Maisie Dobbs in the 1930s, I will soon be an expert on the history of crime and social mores of the London of yesteryear. I will now go back to earlier volumes of the Monk series to see what I have missed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alasandra Alawine

    Monk witnesses a pleasure boat being blown up but before he can start to investigate he is taken off the case. An innocent man is convicted and only another crime on the River leads Monk to the truth that the man that was convicted wasn't there the eyewitnesses were unreliable. Monk takes the information to his superiors and is put back on the case. But when it appears he is getting to close to the truth the ferry he is riding in is rammed and he almost loses his life. Now more convinced then ev Monk witnesses a pleasure boat being blown up but before he can start to investigate he is taken off the case. An innocent man is convicted and only another crime on the River leads Monk to the truth that the man that was convicted wasn't there the eyewitnesses were unreliable. Monk takes the information to his superiors and is put back on the case. But when it appears he is getting to close to the truth the ferry he is riding in is rammed and he almost loses his life. Now more convinced then ever that government corruption was behind the original conviction Monk, with the aid of his friends will uncover the truth and take down the man pulling the strings. Rathbone is back but still unable to practice law. Scruff sends Worm (a young boy) to Hester and she arranges for him to live at the clinic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Good book, but basically not my style...... One summer afternoon a horrifying explosion of the pleasure boat, Princess Mary, sends to their deaths nearly two hundred merrymakers. Solving this mystery is the primary plot of this William Monk mystery.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    The second Anne Perry I've read and probably the last. I found the plot uninteresting and the characters flat.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is number twenty in the Monk series. Monk, commander of London’s River Police, is on patrol with his deputy Orem, when suddenly a large explosion rips open the bow of “The Princess Mary” a large party boat. They set about assisting in the rescue of people but over 179 people die. The next day Monk dives in a hard hat diving suit to see if he can find the site of the explosion. Monk is taken off the case and it is turned over to the head of the Metropolitan police. The police quickly arrest This is number twenty in the Monk series. Monk, commander of London’s River Police, is on patrol with his deputy Orem, when suddenly a large explosion rips open the bow of “The Princess Mary” a large party boat. They set about assisting in the rescue of people but over 179 people die. The next day Monk dives in a hard hat diving suit to see if he can find the site of the explosion. Monk is taken off the case and it is turned over to the head of the Metropolitan police. The police quickly arrest an Egyptian man who is quickly tried and convicted. Monk, Hester and Scuff set out to find the real killer. The book is mainly a morality tale but scuff and his new friend Worm add a bit of lively detail to the story. Perry’s strength lies in her extensive knowledge of the Victorian era which enlivens and adds authentic color to the well-plotted narrative. Every detail of custom and dress, manners is carefully aligned with the 1860’s England, with teeming streets, polluted waterways and deeply rooted class structure and social mannerism. The author’s depiction of life along the waterfront is authentic and most interesting historically. Perry manages to integrate the construction of the Suez Canal into the 1860 story. The story moves on at a very fast pace until the surprising conclusion is reached almost on the last page. I have enjoyed this series and find that it is Hester that I have grown most interested in and enjoy. David Colacci narrated the story and has narrated the majority of books in this series. Colacci does an excellent job with the narration. I read this as an audio book downloaded from Audible. If you enjoy historical novels set in Victorian England you will enjoy this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    This book just did not cut the mustard with me, it was a hard grind getting through it - but get through it I did (I don't know why - dogged determination I think). It promised much with the opening chapter quite gripping as the Princess Mary, a Thames pleasure cruiser, gets blown up with Commander William Monk of the River Police close by. But from then on it goes downhill, or should that be down river, and degenerates into a turgid, slow-moving, unexciting plot with very few, if any, thrills at This book just did not cut the mustard with me, it was a hard grind getting through it - but get through it I did (I don't know why - dogged determination I think). It promised much with the opening chapter quite gripping as the Princess Mary, a Thames pleasure cruiser, gets blown up with Commander William Monk of the River Police close by. But from then on it goes downhill, or should that be down river, and degenerates into a turgid, slow-moving, unexciting plot with very few, if any, thrills at all. Who did blow the cruiser up? Well, an Egyptian national is the prime suspect and, after much dull text he is convicted and jailed by the Metropolitan police after Monk had been removed from the case. Somehow it comes out that the suspect might not have done the dirty deed, at least not on his own, and Monk is restored to investigating but he goes the same way as the rest, boringly looking for the real culprit. Another Egyptian emerges as the likely suspect, the unfortunate race being blamed because of the political problems with the building of the Suez canal. Eventually it turns out that he has been put up to do the job and the last few pages suddenly introduce new facts that bring someone else into the investigation. But it is still unexciting and does not capture the imagination at all, despite Monk's best efforts. I was delighted when it ended and I could move on to something more interesting ... bring on something more entertaining to whet my appetite and restore my faith in reading!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Annabelle

    Monk and Hester in London in a pickle as usual, this is the 20th book in this series, and it takes place during time of the building of the Suez Canal. Now the young homeless dock boy, Scruff, has been adopted. Monk is with the water police, and watches as a pleasure boat blows up, killing around 180 people. There are a lot of politics, the case is taken away from him, and an innocent Egyptian is convicted. Monk finds evidence that it is a false conviction. There are quasi of arcs, i.e. Monk’s t Monk and Hester in London in a pickle as usual, this is the 20th book in this series, and it takes place during time of the building of the Suez Canal. Now the young homeless dock boy, Scruff, has been adopted. Monk is with the water police, and watches as a pleasure boat blows up, killing around 180 people. There are a lot of politics, the case is taken away from him, and an innocent Egyptian is convicted. Monk finds evidence that it is a false conviction. There are quasi of arcs, i.e. Monk’s trouble with his last job, his life before he got amnesia, and Rathbone’s, an attorney friend who has to go to prison and his unrequited love for a married lady.. But these are very vague and if you haven’t read all the books the arcs are too vaigue. The book is a bit dreary, Monk goes around London, and everyone is angry that the case was taken away, and he talks to a lot of people. There aren’t many clues, maybe a design on a boat. Hester, the nurse colleague of Nightingale, saves the day, talking to military people she saved to find out the motive of the bombing. It’s a bit boring, and nothing much happens until the end. It revisionist sensibilities bringing up a massacre of Egyptians during the canal building. But it is fun to enter Monk and Scruff’s world on the river

  17. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    an Encore performance! Wow! I was spellbound to the very end, and swimming in the dark along with most of the cast until then too! When our story opens Monk and Orme are one minute enjoying skimming along the Thames, the next they are thrust into disaster as a pleasure boat explodes, leaving in its wake the dead and drowning. An horrific scene that I could barely take in, along with Monk and Orme and others on the river that night. 200 people are dead. The whys and wherefores are mired in political an Encore performance! Wow! I was spellbound to the very end, and swimming in the dark along with most of the cast until then too! When our story opens Monk and Orme are one minute enjoying skimming along the Thames, the next they are thrust into disaster as a pleasure boat explodes, leaving in its wake the dead and drowning. An horrific scene that I could barely take in, along with Monk and Orme and others on the river that night. 200 people are dead. The whys and wherefores are mired in political bungling and intrigue alongside heightened public tensions and rage. The River police inquiry is taken over by the Metropolitan police. Political or convenience? A scapegoat has been found! Guilty or innocent? Someone has to pay. The posturing in the courtroom reaches new heights. Hester, Scruff and Rathbone? All are players, and a delightful new urchin Worm makes a brief appearance. I do hope he stays! So we left with resolution but a bit of a cliffhanger on at least one personal relationship. Once more the River Thames and it's denizens come to life. Thought provoking, intense and enthralling! A NetGalley ARC

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christine Page

    Blood on the Water is my favorite so far, but each book in the Monk series is my "favorite so far." I did not put it down once I began the book. I admit I like to read the ending of the book before I finish it but knowing the end never spoils the book for me, but makes the end's journey more exciting. I can see the characters twist and move through the plot, the mistakes they make and how the main characters work together to solve the mystery. When Hester grabbed Monk's arm firmly, he knew somet Blood on the Water is my favorite so far, but each book in the Monk series is my "favorite so far." I did not put it down once I began the book. I admit I like to read the ending of the book before I finish it but knowing the end never spoils the book for me, but makes the end's journey more exciting. I can see the characters twist and move through the plot, the mistakes they make and how the main characters work together to solve the mystery. When Hester grabbed Monk's arm firmly, he knew something was wrong and acted accordingly. They worked as a team. Scruff is moving towards manhood and Monk takes on the responsibility to be as good a man as he can be and lead by example. I admit I read the ending several times, and each time felt anxious wondering how would it end even though I knew how it ended. That makes Anne Perry's books so wonderful.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I am done for now with Anne Perry. I love Monk and Hester and Scuff. Even though it is irritating that Hester and sometimes Scuff will go off investigating without telling Monk what they are doing. What kind of teamwork is that? But the ending to this book really ticked me off. Perry fabricated the solution to the mystery from thin air. Usually when I get to the end of a mystery and the villain is revealed I 'aha - now I see the subtle clues'. On very rare occasions I figure it out before our her I am done for now with Anne Perry. I love Monk and Hester and Scuff. Even though it is irritating that Hester and sometimes Scuff will go off investigating without telling Monk what they are doing. What kind of teamwork is that? But the ending to this book really ticked me off. Perry fabricated the solution to the mystery from thin air. Usually when I get to the end of a mystery and the villain is revealed I 'aha - now I see the subtle clues'. On very rare occasions I figure it out before our hero, and then feel very smug and proud of myself. But this one was just ridiculous. So, if you haven't read the book already, after you do, come back and tell me where you figured it out. p.s. Here's a bit of writing I did appreciate; 'Purpose. Perhaps it was the next best thing to happiness. Empty time was a dark hole in which monsters lived and too easily came to the surface.'

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Maskus

    I finished this novel yesterday, but wish I had more to read. The story twisted and turned, but as in all the Monk series, the combined efforts of Hester, Monk, and Rathbone find the means to save the day. This story floats on the sinking of a pleasure boat on the Thames in England. The police catch and convict a suspect, but a motive never surfaces. Anne Perry does a wonderful job with the description of the setting and the characters and the language used by each class of people. The nuances o I finished this novel yesterday, but wish I had more to read. The story twisted and turned, but as in all the Monk series, the combined efforts of Hester, Monk, and Rathbone find the means to save the day. This story floats on the sinking of a pleasure boat on the Thames in England. The police catch and convict a suspect, but a motive never surfaces. Anne Perry does a wonderful job with the description of the setting and the characters and the language used by each class of people. The nuances of class bob in the muddy waters of deceit and greed. The ending gushes to the discovery of the killer and the motive. Touché.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Very disappointed - usually love the Monk series, but this book was hard to get through. There was very little action, but LOTS of mulling over the situation and the consequences. I can't tell you how many paragraphs were written in the format "He (or she) wondered, Was it A? or B? or maybe even C?" The solution of the "mystery" seems to be contrived and there were no hints to its existence until it appears in the last couple of pages. I struggled to get through this one, and found myself skimmi Very disappointed - usually love the Monk series, but this book was hard to get through. There was very little action, but LOTS of mulling over the situation and the consequences. I can't tell you how many paragraphs were written in the format "He (or she) wondered, Was it A? or B? or maybe even C?" The solution of the "mystery" seems to be contrived and there were no hints to its existence until it appears in the last couple of pages. I struggled to get through this one, and found myself skimming lots of paragraphs toward the end....this is the last Anne Perry for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Very, very interesting book. The thing about these William and Hester Monk mysteries is that I'm always more curious about what happens next when the final page is read. I'm so glad this one caught up with Sir Oliver Rathbone and his new perspective on life after his disgrace in the previous novel. Yet I'm seriously anxious to learn what's next in the lives of all of the characters. My reading Anne Perry's Monk books is an addiction approaching its end. There's only one more published book in th Very, very interesting book. The thing about these William and Hester Monk mysteries is that I'm always more curious about what happens next when the final page is read. I'm so glad this one caught up with Sir Oliver Rathbone and his new perspective on life after his disgrace in the previous novel. Yet I'm seriously anxious to learn what's next in the lives of all of the characters. My reading Anne Perry's Monk books is an addiction approaching its end. There's only one more published book in the series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    What another great book by Anne Perry in the Monk series, considering Anne has written a lot with this character the storylines are still intriguing and gripping. This book was no different, all along you are kept guessing as to what is happening overall, who is behind it! In a hundred years I would never have guessed who was responsible for the bombing, how Anne tied it all together was truly gripping so that I had to stay up to the early hours to find out the ending. Great stuff!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    I skipped through it hoping it would get better, but it only got less readable for me. Repetition, constant speculations followed by her usual question marks. Her last couple of novels have left much to be desired, and that really disappoints me as I really loved her earlier books. I can't mark it "finished" because I barely was able to read a paragraph here and there to get the gist of what was happening.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hapzydeco

    This 20th William Monk tale with its familiar Anne Perry characters is a slow, steady read. The gripping beginning and interesting details of Monk's investigation coupled with Hester's quest to find motive will keep you going until the end. As is her forte Perry implants coded references to contemporary issues in her Victorian mysteries. Might there be some connection between the horrifying explosion of the pleasure boat, Princess Mary, and the Lockerbie disaster of Pam Am Flight 103?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    The entire weight of the British legal and military establishments are brought into question in this novel. Not my favorite, but well rendered. I continue to be annoyed by Perry's style. Was it always thus? This author has a monopoly on question marks. Too much of the time she spends in her characters' heads is spent asking unanswerable questions. I have enjoyed seeing Monk and Hester's development, but there seems to be some padding in the writing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the first Anne Perry I haven't been able to finish. I was interrupted for couple of days while reading it and realized I truly didn't care who committed the murder and if I had to read another sentence about the courtroom prosecution, I'd scream. I found the book slow, tedious and surprisingly dull. Until now, I've found Anne Perry's books to be compelling and hard to put down.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Suz

    Generally an Anne Perry fan, but I was disappointed in this one. Curiously dispassionate and procedural; the characters keep giving stirring speeches to explain why we should care about the case in question, but nothing about the narrative leaves us that invested in it. Totally not worth the overdue fines I'm going to have to pay so I could finish it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I disagree with reviewers who said that the author has lost focus. I thought this was excellent. There were plenty of exciting episodes in between the less exciting courtroom drama. All my favorite characters, including Monk, Hester, and Scuff, got into interesting situations while endearing themselves even more. And I found the end surprising. Keep them coming!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Well, now I remember why I stopped reading Anne Perry some time ago. After having the book on hold at the digital library and checking it out several times, I still couldn't finish it. The book just didn't hold my interest. I don't know if her writing changed that much from the early books or if my tastes have just changed, but I just couldn't care what happened.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.