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Dangerous Personalities: An FBI Profiler Shows You How to Identify and Protect Yourself from Harmful People

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We seem to wake up to a new tragedy in the news every day—Newtown, Boston, Aurora, Columbine. So often the reporters say that "there were some signs, but nobody acted." the scary part about these tragedies is that less than 1% of criminals are incarcerated for their crimes, meaning that for every headline, there are millions of dangerous situations in which average people We seem to wake up to a new tragedy in the news every day—Newtown, Boston, Aurora, Columbine. So often the reporters say that "there were some signs, but nobody acted." the scary part about these tragedies is that less than 1% of criminals are incarcerated for their crimes, meaning that for every headline, there are millions of dangerous situations in which average people find themselves. On top of that, how can ordinary people identify threats from those who may not hurt them physically but can devastate their lives on a daily basis—the crazy coworkers, out-of control family members, or relentless neighbors? In Dangerous Personalities, former FBI profiler Joe Navarro shows readers how to identify the four most common "dangerous personalities" and analyze how much of a threat each one can be: the Narcissist, the Predator, the Paranoid, and the Unstable Personality. Along the way, readers learn how to protect themselves both immediately and long-term—as well as how to recover from the trauma of being close to such a destructive force.


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We seem to wake up to a new tragedy in the news every day—Newtown, Boston, Aurora, Columbine. So often the reporters say that "there were some signs, but nobody acted." the scary part about these tragedies is that less than 1% of criminals are incarcerated for their crimes, meaning that for every headline, there are millions of dangerous situations in which average people We seem to wake up to a new tragedy in the news every day—Newtown, Boston, Aurora, Columbine. So often the reporters say that "there were some signs, but nobody acted." the scary part about these tragedies is that less than 1% of criminals are incarcerated for their crimes, meaning that for every headline, there are millions of dangerous situations in which average people find themselves. On top of that, how can ordinary people identify threats from those who may not hurt them physically but can devastate their lives on a daily basis—the crazy coworkers, out-of control family members, or relentless neighbors? In Dangerous Personalities, former FBI profiler Joe Navarro shows readers how to identify the four most common "dangerous personalities" and analyze how much of a threat each one can be: the Narcissist, the Predator, the Paranoid, and the Unstable Personality. Along the way, readers learn how to protect themselves both immediately and long-term—as well as how to recover from the trauma of being close to such a destructive force.

30 review for Dangerous Personalities: An FBI Profiler Shows You How to Identify and Protect Yourself from Harmful People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pam Thomas

    What an impressive and cracker of a book, it took me most of the day to read this one and its just brilliant, what amazing read and an amazing book. There are 4 personality types, paranoid, narcissistic, predator and emotionally unstable. How many times have you met someone and your gut instinct has kicked in and you know there is something not quite right with them but you cant put your finger on it. Well this is the book for you, it digs deep into the reality of people around you and teaches t What an impressive and cracker of a book, it took me most of the day to read this one and its just brilliant, what amazing read and an amazing book. There are 4 personality types, paranoid, narcissistic, predator and emotionally unstable. How many times have you met someone and your gut instinct has kicked in and you know there is something not quite right with them but you cant put your finger on it. Well this is the book for you, it digs deep into the reality of people around you and teaches the reader to use power of observation, watch their behaviour as you can never tlel what you let loose in your and then found out too late when the damage has been done. Its brilliant in that is shows you how to assess flaws in a character or personality, both on a emotional and physical level. If you are a law student studying criminology then this book is a invaluable tool, it certainly opened my eyes to the people who walk in and out of our lives. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

  2. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    How many times have you noticed that when someone commits murder or other abuse, the people who know him/her say how wonderful he/she is? You could be the person who knows someone who is dangerous; Perhaps your neighbor, girlfriend/boyfriend, friend, spouse or acquaintance is a time bomb waiting to go off. Do you really know that the kind young man next door isn't dangerous? Maybe he's planning to walk into a public building and shoot as many people as he can. The sweet girl who works beside you How many times have you noticed that when someone commits murder or other abuse, the people who know him/her say how wonderful he/she is? You could be the person who knows someone who is dangerous; Perhaps your neighbor, girlfriend/boyfriend, friend, spouse or acquaintance is a time bomb waiting to go off. Do you really know that the kind young man next door isn't dangerous? Maybe he's planning to walk into a public building and shoot as many people as he can. The sweet girl who works beside you may abuse her children--it happens. This book explains the four personalities associated with dangerous behaviors: the narcissist, the predator, the paranoid, and the unstable personality. It also tells us how to protect ourselves and if needed, recover from the trauma of being close to one of them. With very detailed checklists and real life examples, including some cases that we've read about in the news, Joe Navarro has written an excellent book to inform all of us. I highly recommend this book. Everyone should read this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Very disappointing, but I probably should have expected it. I learned about the book via an article covering the guy who did the stabbings on Tri-Met. While much of what the article said made sense, it failed to tie his history together with societal trends that clearly made a difference. The introduction is interesting and the last chapter has some good tips. Between that are four chapters cover the personality types that Navarro classifies as dangerous - narcissist, paranoid, unstable, and pred Very disappointing, but I probably should have expected it. I learned about the book via an article covering the guy who did the stabbings on Tri-Met. While much of what the article said made sense, it failed to tie his history together with societal trends that clearly made a difference. The introduction is interesting and the last chapter has some good tips. Between that are four chapters cover the personality types that Navarro classifies as dangerous - narcissist, paranoid, unstable, and predator. Some of the examples work, and some really don't. Then, each chapter has a checklist of about 120 traits to see if they apply, with scoring. Granted, if someone you are worried about has over 60 of the traits, yes, that is probably a problem, but a lot of the suggestions are really questionable (especially for unstable). There is also a chapter on when the traits are combined, and while it is good to understand some of those things can go together, it makes a lot more sense to look at the Hare checklist. It's not that the book has no use, and the unsophisticated writing style may be a better fit for some, but I have learned more about personalities from Daphne Rose Kingma, more about criminal personalities from Ann Rule, more about trusting your instincts from Gavin De Becker, and this book could have been better than it was.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vikki

    I read Dangerous Personalities by Joe Navarro. This is a book that helps identify the menacing threats of people around us. This book takes a look at the narcissistic personality, the emotionally unstable personality, the paranoid personality and the predator. I think these types of books are good to read. "Just as it's up to us to 'look before we cross,' so it's up to us, ... to be vigilant, to have situational awareness, to assess for threats and danger, to take appropriate action to prevent I read Dangerous Personalities by Joe Navarro. This is a book that helps identify the menacing threats of people around us. This book takes a look at the narcissistic personality, the emotionally unstable personality, the paranoid personality and the predator. I think these types of books are good to read. "Just as it's up to us to 'look before we cross,' so it's up to us, ... to be vigilant, to have situational awareness, to assess for threats and danger, to take appropriate action to prevent dangerous individuals from entering our lives, and to deal with them if they do." This book also had an excellent bibliography of similar books. I would recommend this type of book to every person.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Irene McHugh

    I read Joe Navarro's book on decoding body language several years ago, so when this book went on sale in Audible, I grabbed it. Stephen Hoye's narration is exceptional. I was convinced that I was listening to Navarro in a lecture hall. The only drawback to listening to this book with Audible is that the resources Navarro provides would be better in print or e-book format. Namely, the four different check lists for the four different dangerous personalities and the concluding bibliography. Otherwi I read Joe Navarro's book on decoding body language several years ago, so when this book went on sale in Audible, I grabbed it. Stephen Hoye's narration is exceptional. I was convinced that I was listening to Navarro in a lecture hall. The only drawback to listening to this book with Audible is that the resources Navarro provides would be better in print or e-book format. Namely, the four different check lists for the four different dangerous personalities and the concluding bibliography. Otherwise, this book is easy to listen to. There's a chapter on each of the four dangerous personalities: the narcissist, the paranoid, the emotionally unstable, and the predator. Besides defining each personality, these chapters give examples of behaviors and famous people demonstrating each category, and a list of words used by others to describe people with these dangerous personalities. The chapters each end with a thorough questionnaire to help the reader determine if someone they know is a dangerous personality. Navarro stresses that these questionnaires are not clinical, which is one reason he uses lay terms to label each of the dangerous personalities. Instead, the check lists are meant for regular people to be able to use to identify the behaviors and attitudes that may identify a person as dangerous. Navarro gives the reader a scale for the questionnaire to categorize the behaviors from irritating to dangerous. Later chapters delve into details like people with two or more of the dangerous personality traits in abundance. Navarro ends with his advice for anyone dealing with a dangerous personality.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Passenger B.

    This is a great book to learn about so-called "dangerous personalities" for beginners because it is very simply worded and doesn't use clinical or forensic terminology. The personalities described in this book are mainly of the cluster B variant, and in the first chapter the author goes on to talk about the Narcissist. In the chapter about "unstable personalities" it becomes very clear he's talking about mainly people with Borderline and partly Histrionic PD, but also includes people with mood d This is a great book to learn about so-called "dangerous personalities" for beginners because it is very simply worded and doesn't use clinical or forensic terminology. The personalities described in this book are mainly of the cluster B variant, and in the first chapter the author goes on to talk about the Narcissist. In the chapter about "unstable personalities" it becomes very clear he's talking about mainly people with Borderline and partly Histrionic PD, but also includes people with mood disorders such as people with different types of Bipolar. Finally he talks about the "Paranoid personality" and the predators as he refers to them - Antisocial personality, Psychopath and Sociopath. I found certain things a tad exaggerated as it pertains to the Paranoid personality; as someone with a law enforcement background I'm not surprised that only the mildest suspicion of the government not always having the best interest of the people at heart and - provenly - deliberately lying, obscuring etc. makes you "disordered." Same with demonizing everyone who is into holistic healing etc. That was a tad disappointing but as I said, not surprising. What WAS disappointing as much as surprising that the author SERIOUSLY closes with the never uttered but most famous Ted Bundy quote. Listen, this quote never happened. It was in fact pieced together from different statements made in the Dobson interview and done in such a way that it completely twists and turns what was meant. Just to make it look "creepy." I would have expected more from the former rookie officer Navarro, who was actually working the Susan Curtis disappearance back in the mid seventies... To get back to the predator however: They are rarer than movies and facebook groups for broken-hearted women, who felt duped in their previous relationship, might have you believe. I like that he is very structured in his thinking and writing although he has a tendency to sometimes repeat himself which wasn't always easy for me. He gives various examples of people who suffer from these afflictions, combinations of them, and those who had to deal with, work with, live with such personalities, describing the toll it took on them, sometimes even years after contact had ended. The checklists provide a myriad of questions in order to determine if there are people in your life fulfilling some or even almost all of these criteria. He also is very clear on how to handle such personalities, if you cannot avoid them - go no contact. Because of my own encounters with "dangerous personalities" I understand this sentiment. However, it is important to note that all of these disorders exist on a spectrum, and although it is rare, there are indeed those who continuously work very hard on bettering themselves. I repeat, it is rare, but still worth a mention. A short but important book. If you have identified such a "dangerous personality" in your life, however, I recommend reading up about them in more depth in specialized literature because while this book gives a great overview, it is still just that, an overview.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Joe Navarro has written a wonderfully informative and useful guide to spotting truly dangerous personalities. He distills, simplifies and explains major personality disorders so that everyday people can identify individuals with these disorders and effectively deal with the particular dysfunctional individual. I found him to be very well informed and knowledgeable about personality disorders and the problems that individuals who have them can cause. I was impressed by his understanding of these i Joe Navarro has written a wonderfully informative and useful guide to spotting truly dangerous personalities. He distills, simplifies and explains major personality disorders so that everyday people can identify individuals with these disorders and effectively deal with the particular dysfunctional individual. I found him to be very well informed and knowledgeable about personality disorders and the problems that individuals who have them can cause. I was impressed by his understanding of these individuals and how they operate. What was even more impressive was his willingness to share his knowledge and experience with these different types of individuals to prevent vicitimization of innocents. I applaud his effort. I highly recommend this book. In fact, I’m recommending it to my friends so they can be aware and not be vicitimized by a “dangerous personality.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    I picked this up at a book sale thinking it would appeal to my true crime passion. Eh? It was ok-ish. I feel like the target audience is poorly educated, slightly paranoid women. And the lists-- sweet Jesus. If you ever need the world's most tedious lists of negative adjectives then this is for you. Ditto on the questionnaires at the end of each chapter. I feel you'd have to be incredibly incredibly bored to fill the damn things out. Give it a pass. There is simply not enough that is useful and I picked this up at a book sale thinking it would appeal to my true crime passion. Eh? It was ok-ish. I feel like the target audience is poorly educated, slightly paranoid women. And the lists-- sweet Jesus. If you ever need the world's most tedious lists of negative adjectives then this is for you. Ditto on the questionnaires at the end of each chapter. I feel you'd have to be incredibly incredibly bored to fill the damn things out. Give it a pass. There is simply not enough that is useful and interesting to overcome the dull.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    They are everywhere, people with dangerous personality types, they are our spouses, children , parents, co workers, charming strangers and dangerous psychopaths. Many of these individuals with a dangerous personality fly below the radar and do not brook trouble with law enforcement but they can still be dangerous and they can still hurt us. These personality types steal, abuse and even kill. Criminal profiler, Joe Navarro, has written a book that will help you stay safe. In this book 4 personali They are everywhere, people with dangerous personality types, they are our spouses, children , parents, co workers, charming strangers and dangerous psychopaths. Many of these individuals with a dangerous personality fly below the radar and do not brook trouble with law enforcement but they can still be dangerous and they can still hurt us. These personality types steal, abuse and even kill. Criminal profiler, Joe Navarro, has written a book that will help you stay safe. In this book 4 personality types are discussed. The first personality is Narcissistic personality. These types display self importance beyond position. Often time they have a unrealistic and grandiose sense of who they are. The world centers on them. They are above everything and rules do not apply to them. They can be very bullying. Narcissistic people focus a lot on their grooming. People are objects for them to use and they are very selfish and controlling. The next dangerous type is the Emotionally Unstable Personality. This type makes the people sorrounding them very defensive. Relationships with this type are a roller coaster making their partner feel a decrease in happiness and confidence. Unstable people have no clue as to the consequences of their behavior. The oscillate between being a ruler and a victim. Dealing with this type is very draining. They remember past wrongs to use against someone for later. Very insecure with a very low frustration point. Paranoid people think that someone is after them. They tend to think that there is a conspiracy to keep them down. Paranoid types try to insulate their family from the outside world feeling that outside world has dangerous ideas. These people tend to Need more personal space and they oft time show no tenderness. This type tends to be argumentative and they will often time dress in military or some other agressive outfit. The predator is perhaps the most dangerous of all. In this category you have con men, murderers, pedophiles and violent criminals. These people have no conscience and feel no remorse for their acts. To predators following the rules is a sign of weakness and they enjoy duping people who are weaker then them. Predators can come off as being charming or as being cold and callous. The book is not designed to make you a mental health technician who can make diagnoses but rather it gives a guideline so you can identify that something is dangerous and you can take measures to protect yourself. Sometimes people will have symptoms of multiple disorders . The final chapter gives guideline on how to protect yourself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aura

    I would absolutely make this book a household requirement. Put it right there along with the bible and the dictionary. Except you should actually read this one every once in a while. If everyone learned how to recognize dangerous people despite the deceiving social masks they wear, the world would be a much safer place.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tarek Omran

    This is a fantastic book! It has very actionable content towards the dangerous people we might face in our lives. Read it, enjoy a safer circle of friends, and save your life!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    Navarro’s expertise is obvious in his command on the subject, and he backs up his statements with many examples from the depth and breadth of his career experience. And with Poynter’s turn of phrase, the book is an easily enjoyable and highly informative read. He makes clear that this is not a book about handling these personality types or resolving the issues that caused them. He acknowledges that there are other experts and other books for that. This is simply meant as a guide to recognizing and Navarro’s expertise is obvious in his command on the subject, and he backs up his statements with many examples from the depth and breadth of his career experience. And with Poynter’s turn of phrase, the book is an easily enjoyable and highly informative read. He makes clear that this is not a book about handling these personality types or resolving the issues that caused them. He acknowledges that there are other experts and other books for that. This is simply meant as a guide to recognizing and protecting one’s self from these personalities — written by a man who has personally heard the stories of far too many victims. Navarro provides an extensive check-list at the end of each personality description, that allows you to easily evaluate the behaviors of those you might suspect of having these dangerous personalities. Read my takeaways and personality "cheat sheets".

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Haque

    It's good book to know about the basics of the dangerous personalities. Of course, nothing beats your own instinct and having a general idea on what you are probably facing might help you protect yourself. However, it’s not from a medical perspective. Joe writes from his own experience and training so there are practical examples here which is very helpful I think but still it’s pretty basic, great if you are beginner and not familiar with the psychological terms.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Ignorance is not bliss, it’s preparation for victimization. Avoid this book at your own peril. Writing is a little repetitive in places but it’s still an important read that is focused on practical application of the knowledge and prevention.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Not a lot that's new here. Marketed as a layperson's guide to certain pathological personality types, it covers the same ground as most introductions to abnormal psychology, but without the expert's perspective. The author writes from the standpoint of a law enforcement official, rather than a trained psychologist. Hence, the content tends to be heavily anecdotal, rather than research-based, drawing from the author's experience in the field. In essence, it adds a layer of unnecessary obfuscation Not a lot that's new here. Marketed as a layperson's guide to certain pathological personality types, it covers the same ground as most introductions to abnormal psychology, but without the expert's perspective. The author writes from the standpoint of a law enforcement official, rather than a trained psychologist. Hence, the content tends to be heavily anecdotal, rather than research-based, drawing from the author's experience in the field. In essence, it adds a layer of unnecessary obfuscation, referring, for instance, to borderline personality disorder as "emotionally unstable" personalities. Why not just use the correct clinical terminology, since it exists, and could point interested parties to a larger body of literature on the phenomenon? Overall, the book was heavy on description, listing case after case of pathological personalities and the damage they wrought -- Madoff, Bundy, etc -- mostly already well-documented in the public realm, if not always explicitly tied to psychopathology. The solutions were light and limited to a few short pages at the end. I can only hang so much blame on the author for that, as these personalities are quite intransigent, even in the hands of trained professionals. Perhaps the best advice the author gives is to simply avoid them, probably a good guideline for anyone. Because of the havoc they cause, the kinds of personality disorders this author describes will likely continue to be studied by both law enforcement and psychology professionals for some time (until recently, most were classified as "Cluster B" according to the APA, though the most recent version of the DSM has revised that approach; it's still a useful framework for those who want to look it up and learn more). For those interested in the subject, there are definitely better introductions out there, like Martha Stout's classic The Sociopath Next Door. The pros: The book is briskly written, a breezy, quick read that won't tax you. The cons: You likely won't learn much either. The tips at the end are valuable, as far as they go; from the perspective of the reader, this book would have been much better if the first 4/5s had been summarized (which would have been easy as it's fairly repetitive) and the tips at the end left as is, for a medium-length feature article. Anyone interested in the topic would be best advised to skip to the last chapter and save themselves the time required to read the rest.

  16. 4 out of 5

    sweepea888

    I liked Navarro's book on body language (read years ago, not sure if I ever reviewed on here) and as an ex agent he's full of useful information that's been tested 'on the field' (say that in mixed company and sound like a douche I dare you). Some good examples of what behaviors/red flags to look for can be found. Navarro is clear that he is not a mental health professional and does not encourage 'armchair diagnosing' people per se. In each chapter he includes a comprehensive checklist of aberra I liked Navarro's book on body language (read years ago, not sure if I ever reviewed on here) and as an ex agent he's full of useful information that's been tested 'on the field' (say that in mixed company and sound like a douche I dare you). Some good examples of what behaviors/red flags to look for can be found. Navarro is clear that he is not a mental health professional and does not encourage 'armchair diagnosing' people per se. In each chapter he includes a comprehensive checklist of aberrant/unhealthy behavioral patterns endemic to specific personality disorders. This can ensure no unpleasant 'surprises' when you are letting new people into your life/inner circle. While I read enough on aberrant personalities (I'm funny like that) many of the things we might think are obvious alarms other people might overlook. This book is like a starter guide for people interested in scratching the surface. Navarro cites the stellar book by Gavin DeBecker 'The Gift Of Fear' several times as a worthy follow up for anyone wishing to pursue this subject matter further. I'd also recommend it as well if you read this book and want to get into the meat of the matter. Oh, that sounds gnarly.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. REVIEW: DANGEROUS PERSONALITIES by Joe Navarro For all those questions of "What would make a person do something like that?" asked about school or workplace shootings; all the "But he seemed such a nice, quiet young man," spoken of family killers, or serial murderers--here is an answer. Former FBI profiler Joe Navarro categorizes those he refers to "dangerous personalities" into four distinctions: NARCISSISTIC EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE PARANOID PERSONALITY PREDATOR. That last category includes those popula REVIEW: DANGEROUS PERSONALITIES by Joe Navarro For all those questions of "What would make a person do something like that?" asked about school or workplace shootings; all the "But he seemed such a nice, quiet young man," spoken of family killers, or serial murderers--here is an answer. Former FBI profiler Joe Navarro categorizes those he refers to "dangerous personalities" into four distinctions: NARCISSISTIC EMOTIONALLY UNSTABLE PARANOID PERSONALITY PREDATOR. That last category includes those popularly known as psychopaths and sociopaths. The umbrella of "Predator" is key to identity individuals whose behavior, in aggregate, may range from simply taking advantage, to conning, on to damage, injury, and ultimately, murder. Mr. Navarro aims at educating a lay audience, and provides clear and recognizable information, minus psychiatric jargon

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Crow

    I like the idea of this book, on how to recognize and avoid people who might be up to no good, but the presentation was quite superficial. There just wasn't a whole book's worth of information--it would have been better as a magazine article. The writing was kind of repetitive and hokey, too. (And seriously, do people need to be told that if someone they know matches tons of items on a 'dangerous personality' checklist, they should probably avoid this person? Well, I guess some people do need to I like the idea of this book, on how to recognize and avoid people who might be up to no good, but the presentation was quite superficial. There just wasn't a whole book's worth of information--it would have been better as a magazine article. The writing was kind of repetitive and hokey, too. (And seriously, do people need to be told that if someone they know matches tons of items on a 'dangerous personality' checklist, they should probably avoid this person? Well, I guess some people do need to be told that, hence the reason he wrote this book.)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    This book is fantastic. I've read other of Navarro's books, and loved them. In this one, he analyzes what, from his perspective in law enforcement, are the primary types of dangerous personalities, how to identify them in people as a non-specialist and how to defend yourself from them. He analyzes the narcissist, the emotionally unstable, the paranoid and the predator. The information was incredibly solid and practical, and gave me new insights into a few people that I've known in the past. This This book is fantastic. I've read other of Navarro's books, and loved them. In this one, he analyzes what, from his perspective in law enforcement, are the primary types of dangerous personalities, how to identify them in people as a non-specialist and how to defend yourself from them. He analyzes the narcissist, the emotionally unstable, the paranoid and the predator. The information was incredibly solid and practical, and gave me new insights into a few people that I've known in the past. This book has a lot of bang for your buck / reading time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

    a must read for everyone, in my opinion. most people are good and kind and we are raised to mostly blindly trust.....this attitude has to change in order to protect ourselves. educating ourselves about the "bad ones" can help us recognize them for who they are right at the beginning.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    3.5 stars from me. A great book that gives a good insight into various personality types. I deducted half a star because the checklists were a bit much for me, making each chapter feel like a quest for self-help. Otherwise thoroughly researched content that leads you down a vast rabbit hole of potential next reads. I would recommend this book but maybe skip those checklists and descriptors littered throughout.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Corbin Payne

    Psychology isn’t my thing. That said, I appreciated how accessible the information is in here. This isn’t a textbook analysis of theory, it’s a practical guide to identifying bad personalities in our life and how to deal with them. Seriously, it has checklists. If nothing else, you can use it to identify what dangerous personality type your crappy ex is!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Greg Butler

    Dangerous Personalities is a book every human being should read. It defines some of the most important aspects of how to be able to understand and recognize the toxic signs of a Narcissistic, Unstable, Paranoid , and Predatorial characteristics of people who might be in your social circle. If you can notice the warning signs, ( And he covers all of them) you could possibly save yourself from a lifetime of woes. Joe Navarro also gives great advice on how to handle and escape these personalities Dangerous Personalities is a book every human being should read. It defines some of the most important aspects of how to be able to understand and recognize the toxic signs of a Narcissistic, Unstable, Paranoid , and Predatorial characteristics of people who might be in your social circle. If you can notice the warning signs, ( And he covers all of them) you could possibly save yourself from a lifetime of woes. Joe Navarro also gives great advice on how to handle and escape these personalities if you are caught up in the dangerous web of lies, arrogance and possibly murderous affairs these personalities feed off of. Do your self a favor. Read it. It could save your life.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nanette

    Interesting premise, and throughout the book a lot of valid and educational points are made, but I somehow expected more. It's a very basic read, however it might actually be helpful for some people.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Tobias Christian Fischer

    What a great book. It’s very visualized and shows a lot of things that are good to keep in mind when meeting new people.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Holladay Shaw

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's an easy read, but repetitive. I didn't feel it was as well written as his other book "what every body is saying". But regardless if you are looking for a book to valid your feelings of someone in your life as "dangerous", this book will be a book of interest to you. The most useful part of the book was at the end of each chapter, the list of statements you checked if it applied to the person you were thinking about. It brought insight on what "normal", "safe" behavior looks like even though It's an easy read, but repetitive. I didn't feel it was as well written as his other book "what every body is saying". But regardless if you are looking for a book to valid your feelings of someone in your life as "dangerous", this book will be a book of interest to you. The most useful part of the book was at the end of each chapter, the list of statements you checked if it applied to the person you were thinking about. It brought insight on what "normal", "safe" behavior looks like even though most of them are obvious. It's nice to have someone straight out say that behavior is a red flag if you've never told a family member, friend, counselor, etc about your concerns. Narcissistic: -name calling to make oneself feel higher up -requires admiration from others -envious of others -talks at you instead of with you (one sided conversation) -only sees their own problem and ignores others issues -everything is done for selfless reasons instead of for the good of others -when criticized, feels insecure or lash out -devaluses your work and makes you feel worthless without considering your feelings -publicly belittled others -disinterested in knowing more about you -only appreciates those who can do something for them -the word "I" dominates conversation. -sees those who disagree with them as "enemies" -tries to control what others do or think -sees flaws in others routinely, but not in themselves -does not like being critiqued,even when it is helpful -sees personal problems in others as signs of inferiority, weakness, or poor impulse control -very easily sees weaknesses in others and is quick to exploit those weaknesses -is not a very good listener -demands that others make changes to suit his needs at their expense or inconvenience -uses insults -repeatedly fails to see or view things from others' perspective; lacks empathic understanding of others and their needs or desires -has intentionally kept others waiting -doesn't hesitate to burden others with the trivial, even when others are occupied or attending to more important things -jealous of others success instead of being happy for them -is unable to identify the needs, wants, desires, and feelings of those closest to them -is impatient with others -incesantly talks about themselves -tends to discuss personal issues/concerns in inappropriate or expansive detail, oblivious to time constraints or the sensitivity of others Emotional Unstable: -those closest to them ask, "where did this come from?" "Was that really necessary?", and "When will it happen again?" -"don't take critism well, very sensitive to real or perceived slights, and can turn on you when they feel insulted. They're quick to feel victimized, so they immefiately demonize others" -"react emotionally rather than logically when stressed or critiqued. Their thinking is binary: all or nothing, good or bad, black or white...you are either with them or against them" -display intense anger and outbursts are disproportionaye to the circumstances or event -since knowing or entering into a relationship with this person, you have become less happy, less confident, or less sure of yourself -relationships are a rollercoaster of highs and lows -the person is unable to appreciate the consequences of his statement or behavior and how it may affect others -seems to fall apart under stress with some frequency -arguements that should last a few minutes may go on for hours or days with no effort to ameliorate or end them -seems to play role victim or princess with regularity -frequently displays or expresses feelings of panic, anxiety, irritability, sadness, or anger -gets bored very easily, needs excitement -intense anger has been observed toward family members -recurrent instances of fighting, arguing or physical confrontation with others -you can't seem to relax or chill out around this person -has mentioned multiple times that someone or group has it in for him -when you are around him, you feel emotionally and physically drained -frantically works at avoiding real or imagined abandonment by lovers or friends -at times, this person's behavior seems theatrical -arguements are bitter and ugly - full of invective and cursing -is excessively demanding of others as it relates to favors, time, attention, or money -rather than make amends or bring closure, likes to wallow in argument -known to harbor grievance for a very long time -easily critizes others, causing humiliation or embarrassment -claims to forgive but never does: wrings or injustices are remembered specifically for use in future arguments -has a short fuse and frustration level is very low -seems incapable of consistent love, caring or empathy -not happy being herself -wants to be someone else -very sensitive to what others say and think about him- tends to lash out when criticized -changes in plans are very upsetting and cause anxiety or irritability -does not understand or practice altruistic love -you feel trapped by this person in some way -it seems that this person's emotions are always so intense -complained about feeling inferior repeatedly -everything this person does for others seems to come at a price or with strings attached -changes loyalty quickly -seems to be very insecure and vigorously attempts to overcompensate -associating with this person lowers your self-esteem -is very resourceful at blaming others when things go wrong -turns critism into counter critism, even if illogical or false -is in a constant power struggle with others -is stubborn and argumentative - seems to always want the last word -fluctates between extremes of idealization (love) and devaluation (hate) others -doesnt seem to learn from previous relationships or life experiences -desires relationship with an "ideal person" who will be all caring, all giving, and omnipresent -at their total disposal -is impulsive as it relates to one or more areas (sex, unrestrained spending, binge eating, etc) -seems capricious and temperamental without cause -has turned against loved ones dramatically without reasonable cause Seems emotionally distance, even when trying to be close -has repeatedly accused you of being the cause of his problems or unhappiness -feels secure and happy with an entourage or group - doesn't like to be alone -there always seems to be tension (almost everything is taken negatively) -seems temperamentally sensitive -has placed demands on you to take sides against someone else -seems unable to control outbursts of anger -has talked about or has actually physically retaliated against someone (scratched a car door with a key, sent hate mail, etc) -has gone to great effort or expense or travel great distance to follow, observe, or harass someone

  27. 4 out of 5

    Charmin

    Highlights: (4) Narcissist / Emotionally Unstable / Paranoia / Predator 1. Narcissism - fame must always remain on them (via power role or children). 2. Document Concerning Interactions: Whoever has the most accurate records wins. Personally document all instances. Written journal trumps memory, wrote down all details, time, and location. 3. Unstable personality - makes everyone suffer. 4. Displays of "niceness" are not goodness. Goodness is internal character. 5. Use distance as away of creating a Highlights: (4) Narcissist / Emotionally Unstable / Paranoia / Predator 1. Narcissism - fame must always remain on them (via power role or children). 2. Document Concerning Interactions: Whoever has the most accurate records wins. Personally document all instances. Written journal trumps memory, wrote down all details, time, and location. 3. Unstable personality - makes everyone suffer. 4. Displays of "niceness" are not goodness. Goodness is internal character. 5. Use distance as away of creating a barrier. Get away 6. Predator tries to control and try to create urgency. Resist isolation - it used for control. Don't get into a vehicle that will take you to a second location. Cut emotional strings of social puppeteers to try to manipulate. 7. Time & Location can become dangerous. Interpersonal violence happens between 8p-2am. 8. Make yourself uninviting - how you walk and pay attention. 9. Trusting ppl are more likely to be duped. Due diligence, feel something is wrong --> act. 10. You are not socially obligated to be terrorized or victimized.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Am Y

    The anecdotes (personal stories) were interesting, and each chapter provides an actual list of characteristics that each dangerous personality type may possess, as well as a questionnaire (akin to a checklist) that you can fill out to determine if anyone you know - including yourself - is a dangerous personality type. I would very much have liked to read about HOW certain dangerous types manipulated their victims, or committed their crimes, as that would have been more insightful though. E.g. Ho The anecdotes (personal stories) were interesting, and each chapter provides an actual list of characteristics that each dangerous personality type may possess, as well as a questionnaire (akin to a checklist) that you can fill out to determine if anyone you know - including yourself - is a dangerous personality type. I would very much have liked to read about HOW certain dangerous types manipulated their victims, or committed their crimes, as that would have been more insightful though. E.g. How cult leaders slowly brainwash their victims. The book focused too much on macro aspect of things (i.e. generalisations) rather than the micro (e.g. how actual criminals operate), which I felt would have been more useful.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Roger Rosenberg

    Very useful discussion of dangerous personalities with checklists provided to help identify them. These lists do not meet professional psychological standards, but they are useful in helping to identify problem relationships that threaten to become toxic or harmful. The author’s concern that we learn to protect ourselves by avoiding or exiting relationships before they become dangerous is evident.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wintermagic

    Thank you Rodale and Goodreads for this book. I found it very interesting and enlightening to read. The first thing I did after reading it was show my 13 yr old daughter the checklists and lists of terms associated with each personality type. I may have suggested she see how a few of her friends do with it. She has decided to read it as well.

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