counter create hit No Man's Land: Fiction from a World at War - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

No Man's Land: Fiction from a World at War

Availability: Ready to download

The Great War gave birth to some of the twentieth century’s most celebrated writing; from D. H. Lawrence to Siegfried Sassoon, the literature generated by the war is etched into collective memory. But it is in fiction that we find some of the most profound insights into the war’s individual and communal tragedies, the horror of life in the trenches, and the grand farce of The Great War gave birth to some of the twentieth century’s most celebrated writing; from D. H. Lawrence to Siegfried Sassoon, the literature generated by the war is etched into collective memory. But it is in fiction that we find some of the most profound insights into the war’s individual and communal tragedies, the horror of life in the trenches, and the grand farce of the first industrial war. Featuring forty-seven writers from twenty different nations, representing all the main participants in the conflict, No Man’s Land is a truly international anthology of World War I fiction. Work by Erich Maria Remarque, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Rose Macaulay sits alongside forgotten masterpieces such as Stratis Myrivilis’s Life in the Tomb, Raymond Escholier’s Mahmadou Fofana, and Mary Borden’s The Forbidden Zone. No Man’s Land is a brilliant memorial to the twentieth century’s most cataclysmic event.


Compare

The Great War gave birth to some of the twentieth century’s most celebrated writing; from D. H. Lawrence to Siegfried Sassoon, the literature generated by the war is etched into collective memory. But it is in fiction that we find some of the most profound insights into the war’s individual and communal tragedies, the horror of life in the trenches, and the grand farce of The Great War gave birth to some of the twentieth century’s most celebrated writing; from D. H. Lawrence to Siegfried Sassoon, the literature generated by the war is etched into collective memory. But it is in fiction that we find some of the most profound insights into the war’s individual and communal tragedies, the horror of life in the trenches, and the grand farce of the first industrial war. Featuring forty-seven writers from twenty different nations, representing all the main participants in the conflict, No Man’s Land is a truly international anthology of World War I fiction. Work by Erich Maria Remarque, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Rose Macaulay sits alongside forgotten masterpieces such as Stratis Myrivilis’s Life in the Tomb, Raymond Escholier’s Mahmadou Fofana, and Mary Borden’s The Forbidden Zone. No Man’s Land is a brilliant memorial to the twentieth century’s most cataclysmic event.

59 review for No Man's Land: Fiction from a World at War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ray LaManna

    This is a good diverse collection of pieces from both sides which fought in World War I. Part of my ongoing reading on the 100th anniversary of the ending of the war. Many of these pieces were quite poignant.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Benson

    This is an anthology of short stories and memoir pieces written by writers from many countries who had experienced World War I firsthand or were part of that era. I first began this book at the beginning of September but quit halfway through because I found the stories were all blending into each other. Most of the settings were either the battle trenches or field hospitals and I could not keep the stories straight. I began the second half again in the beginning of October and I took it more slo This is an anthology of short stories and memoir pieces written by writers from many countries who had experienced World War I firsthand or were part of that era. I first began this book at the beginning of September but quit halfway through because I found the stories were all blending into each other. Most of the settings were either the battle trenches or field hospitals and I could not keep the stories straight. I began the second half again in the beginning of October and I took it more slowly. While there is a good mix of writers from many nationalities, this is a book to read slowly to distinguish all the writers from each other.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A bit grim, but that was to be expected. Goodreads has the title wrong - my copy is subtitled Writings from a world at war, not Fiction. Some of the excerpts were fictionalised accounts, others straight memoirs - it wasn't always clear which until you got to the biographical note at the end of each section. It would have been more helpful to have those notes at the beginning of the sections, to give context. A bit grim, but that was to be expected. Goodreads has the title wrong - my copy is subtitled Writings from a world at war, not Fiction. Some of the excerpts were fictionalised accounts, others straight memoirs - it wasn't always clear which until you got to the biographical note at the end of each section. It would have been more helpful to have those notes at the beginning of the sections, to give context.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike Slawdog

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free as part of Goodreads' First Read program. As the title suggests, this book is a compilation of fiction relating to WWI. The sampled works include both short stories and excerpts from novels. Featured authors hailed from many different countries (UK, Australia, France, Germany, Russia, India, Croatia, America, Italy, Austria, Armenia, Turkey, etc.) and from different perspectives (soldiers, nurses, spouses). In the introduction, Ayrton describes the proces Disclaimer: I received this book for free as part of Goodreads' First Read program. As the title suggests, this book is a compilation of fiction relating to WWI. The sampled works include both short stories and excerpts from novels. Featured authors hailed from many different countries (UK, Australia, France, Germany, Russia, India, Croatia, America, Italy, Austria, Armenia, Turkey, etc.) and from different perspectives (soldiers, nurses, spouses). In the introduction, Ayrton describes the process by which he chose the stories, attempting to include as many different perspectives as possible, and he details some differences he noted based on country of origin and the demographics of the authors. Ayrton also decided to not include any work written after 1945, feeling that WWII substantially changed the outlook the world had on WWI, so all of the included fiction was written before the end of WWII. Overall, I enjoyed this book. Some of the stories were very vivid and well-written, although others did capture my attention as much either due to the author's style or writing. Likewise, some of the authors are fairly famous (D.H. Lawrence, Remarque, Trumbo, Sassoon, and Faulkner), while others were much lesser known. With that said, many of the authors of which I had previously been unaware wrote very well, including Emilio Lussu, Robin Hyde, and Helen Zenna Smith. While Aytron attempted to draw attention to the differences between the works in his introduction, the similarities between them stood out to me much more starkly; all of these stories are anti-war. Admittedly, they may be sub-categorized somewhat within that genre, with focuses on the futility of killing, resentment toward corrupt leaders/capitalism which spurred the war, a detachment between soldiers/nurses and home society (particularly among the British stories), frustration with military leadership, or the nature of humans in war. Still, do not expect any examples of propaganda within this book, and some stories are somewhat uncomfortable to read in the descriptions of soldiers losing their minds, of vivid hospital depictions, and of criticisms of non-combatants on the home front. One thing that I did not like about this collection was the fact that it is a collection; the stories' ordering did not seem to have a particular logic, and skipping between writers, settings, and time frames made the book a little disjointed. Thus, it is not likely to be something you pick up and cannot put down. There also seemed to be a preponderance of British fiction relative to the other combatant nations, which is probably due to the author's nationality, the language of the works, and the amount of fiction that came out of the UK after the war. Nevertheless, there is value to this book, as it gives a great sampling for one to choose full-length novels from, to gain a broad perspective on WWI as seen from those who witnessed it, or for use in an educational setting. With that in mind, I recommend this book for those looking to learn about WWI from an individual, rather than macro, perspective, and for teachers/professors who might see use in choosing particular stories for comparing and contrasting viewpoints.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charles Berteau

    I finished this book about a month ago, but never got the chance to add a review. It's one of the many books published to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War I, and I enjoyed it thoroughly. It's a collection of fictional short stories and excerpts, although many are pseudo-autobiographical. Some are heart-wrenching, some uplifting, almost all are engrossing. The collections comes from across the scope of the war: not just the western front but also the eastern front, the Italian fro I finished this book about a month ago, but never got the chance to add a review. It's one of the many books published to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War I, and I enjoyed it thoroughly. It's a collection of fictional short stories and excerpts, although many are pseudo-autobiographical. Some are heart-wrenching, some uplifting, almost all are engrossing. The collections comes from across the scope of the war: not just the western front but also the eastern front, the Italian front, Gallipoli, etc; and all participants. I especially like the stories that highlight the growing awareness on the home front of the pointlessness of the struggle, and the tensions between the oft-warmongering older generation and the heroic-image press, and the young men who actually had to join the slaughter. There are authors known and unknown here: from D.H. Lawrence, William Faulkner, and Erich Maria Remarque to Arnold Zweig, Josep Pla, and Irene Rathbone. It's not for the faint hearted, but one does not need to be a military history buff to enjoy the humanity of the stories - for good and bad. I'm not usually a short-story fan, but I really enjoyed the book and its broad sweep.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Peace

    I thought about saying that if you've ever thought about sending your kids to war, or someone else's kids, or if you've ever profited from war, or if you've ever said," You must be proud that he/she has sacrificed their lives for ______(their country, God, Allah, me, the flag, freedom, the free market, etc.)" or if you would rather give time and money after men and women are maimed and disfigured and crippled rather than before to prevent them from getting maimed and disfigured and crippled and I thought about saying that if you've ever thought about sending your kids to war, or someone else's kids, or if you've ever profited from war, or if you've ever said," You must be proud that he/she has sacrificed their lives for ______(their country, God, Allah, me, the flag, freedom, the free market, etc.)" or if you would rather give time and money after men and women are maimed and disfigured and crippled rather than before to prevent them from getting maimed and disfigured and crippled and dead, then you ought to read this anthology. But I'm not going to say all that. It just won't matter to most of us and Gandhi and Jesus are dead. After a hundred years, we're all still doing the same things, still mouthing the same platitudes, still telling ourselves the same old lies. Kudos to Mr. Ayrton for this collection, the best of its kind I've ever read. He includes pieces by authors from all the Fronts, particularly from Germany eastward, as well as from that often hidden Front, the home. Perhaps this book should be required in junior high schools. Perhaps that lies our hope.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Donaghey

    NO MAN’S LAND: FICTION FROM A WORLD AT WAR, 1914-1918 is a biting reminder that war, any war, is hell. And WWI was also mud, blood, lice, death, stench, dismay and lack of hope, the ennui of days on end with lack of sleep, poor food, mud in everything and rats. Lots and lots of rats. The rats were having a feeding frenzy. The stories are told by many nationalities and ages from both sides of the trenches. This is a bleak and unremorseful look at war stripped of all the glory leaving only the t NO MAN’S LAND: FICTION FROM A WORLD AT WAR, 1914-1918 is a biting reminder that war, any war, is hell. And WWI was also mud, blood, lice, death, stench, dismay and lack of hope, the ennui of days on end with lack of sleep, poor food, mud in everything and rats. Lots and lots of rats. The rats were having a feeding frenzy. The stories are told by many nationalities and ages from both sides of the trenches. This is a bleak and unremorseful look at war stripped of all the glory leaving only the tattered remains of the dead behind. The writing itself is nearly uniformly excellent, but the tales are by and large disheartening. I had a hard time wading through this sea of tragedy and despair, but it does offer a very revealing glimpse into the live of a generation that is gone from us now. My husband had an easier time but did find much of the book to be depressing. I won this book through Goodreads.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Don Morrison

    This is an anthology, so my guess is that you'll love some of the selections and simply like others. Pete Ayrton is the former publisher and editor of Serpent's Tail Press, which may give you some idea of what his taste is like. To give you an idea, and this is not about The Great War, he published the reissue of Cutter & Bone in 2001 -- a book with a small but avid following which was made into the film Cutter's Way (1982) with John Heard, Jeff Bridges, and Lisa Eichhorn. Directed by Ivan Passe This is an anthology, so my guess is that you'll love some of the selections and simply like others. Pete Ayrton is the former publisher and editor of Serpent's Tail Press, which may give you some idea of what his taste is like. To give you an idea, and this is not about The Great War, he published the reissue of Cutter & Bone in 2001 -- a book with a small but avid following which was made into the film Cutter's Way (1982) with John Heard, Jeff Bridges, and Lisa Eichhorn. Directed by Ivan Passer. Without spoilers, you have a pretty good idea of what kind of things Pete Ayrton would select for this huge anthology.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This book is a collection of excerpts from longer works of fiction set in the time of the first world war. Each excerpt includes a brief account of the original publication and a few lines about the author. All in all the book left me unsatisfied because the stories were not quite enough to satisfy my interest. I did particular enjoy the stories that reflected WWI from a woman's point of view because they revealed the sorrow of war outside of the battle front. This book is a collection of excerpts from longer works of fiction set in the time of the first world war. Each excerpt includes a brief account of the original publication and a few lines about the author. All in all the book left me unsatisfied because the stories were not quite enough to satisfy my interest. I did particular enjoy the stories that reflected WWI from a woman's point of view because they revealed the sorrow of war outside of the battle front.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Themightycheez

    Disclaimer: this book was provided to me for review. Wow. This book blew my mind a little. So good. A diverse collection of fiction from WWI, showing so many differing points of view of the same events. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Shilstone

    Fiction about World War I from 50 writers will cause history buffs to look into purchasing full books from the tantalizing excerpts presented here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alec Gray

    A great anthology of writing on WWI that strives to include authors that most readers may not have encountered. I found sections from nurses and Eastern European writers very compelling

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul Taylor

    Described by Helen Dunmore as:"Superb....an impressive anthology that bears an extraordinary cargo of human experience"; I cannot improve upon that. Described by Helen Dunmore as:"Superb....an impressive anthology that bears an extraordinary cargo of human experience"; I cannot improve upon that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charles M.

    Selection of literature written about World War I, from both famous and not so famous authors, including D.H. Lawrence, Eric Remarque, Willa Cather and William Faulkner.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jawid

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve Michael

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bakely

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gerrit

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  20. 4 out of 5

    Svenja

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leissa

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Simon Yorke

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sherlock

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rachella Baker

  32. 5 out of 5

    Carla

  33. 4 out of 5

    K.

  34. 4 out of 5

    Vykki

  35. 4 out of 5

    Derk West

  36. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

  37. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  38. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  39. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  40. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  41. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  42. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  43. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  44. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jose Gregorio

  46. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  47. 4 out of 5

    Katie Harder-schauer

  48. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  49. 4 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  50. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  51. 4 out of 5

    Chet

  52. 5 out of 5

    Pat

  53. 4 out of 5

    J

  54. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  55. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  56. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  57. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  58. 4 out of 5

    Jin

  59. 5 out of 5

    Kim Friant

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.