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We Are Proud To Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884 - 1915

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I'm not doing a German accent You aren't doing an African accent We aren't doing accents A group of actors gather to tell the little-known story of the first genocide of the twentieth century. As the full force of a horrific past crashes into the good intentions of the present, what seemed a far-away place and time is suddenly all too close to home. Just whose story are they I'm not doing a German accent You aren't doing an African accent We aren't doing accents A group of actors gather to tell the little-known story of the first genocide of the twentieth century. As the full force of a horrific past crashes into the good intentions of the present, what seemed a far-away place and time is suddenly all too close to home. Just whose story are they telling? Award-winning playwright Jackie Sibblies Drury collides the political with the personal in a play that is irreverently funny and seriously brave. We Are Proud To Present . . . received its European premiere at the Bush Theatre, London, on 28 February 2014.


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I'm not doing a German accent You aren't doing an African accent We aren't doing accents A group of actors gather to tell the little-known story of the first genocide of the twentieth century. As the full force of a horrific past crashes into the good intentions of the present, what seemed a far-away place and time is suddenly all too close to home. Just whose story are they I'm not doing a German accent You aren't doing an African accent We aren't doing accents A group of actors gather to tell the little-known story of the first genocide of the twentieth century. As the full force of a horrific past crashes into the good intentions of the present, what seemed a far-away place and time is suddenly all too close to home. Just whose story are they telling? Award-winning playwright Jackie Sibblies Drury collides the political with the personal in a play that is irreverently funny and seriously brave. We Are Proud To Present . . . received its European premiere at the Bush Theatre, London, on 28 February 2014.

30 review for We Are Proud To Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884 - 1915

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Pollock

    Read this play because we're about to produce it at work. Really thought-provoking and i'll be interested to see how it translates from page to stage. Read this play because we're about to produce it at work. Really thought-provoking and i'll be interested to see how it translates from page to stage.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Oliver James

    "What's happening is the important thing, it doesn't matter when it happens, or how long it happens for, it's that it's happening. Am I right?" -- This play does not hold back, and it shouldn't. So many plays have something to say and just don't manage it - this play says it, says it again and then says it a couple more times for good measure. It makes you think about the responsibility creators have to tell the truth, and about how difficult the truth can be to see, to live, and to experience. "What's happening is the important thing, it doesn't matter when it happens, or how long it happens for, it's that it's happening. Am I right?" -- This play does not hold back, and it shouldn't. So many plays have something to say and just don't manage it - this play says it, says it again and then says it a couple more times for good measure. It makes you think about the responsibility creators have to tell the truth, and about how difficult the truth can be to see, to live, and to experience. I cannot recommend this play enough, but be warned - it is not as light a read as it seems.

  3. 4 out of 5

    rianna

    Sept 2020: Another fine work from Sibblies Drury, 'We Are Proud to Present' tackles issues of storytelling; who can hold claim to what stories and the ways that histories are recounted to be told. As the title suggests, the play follows a group of actors creating and showing a presentation of the Herero and Nama of Namibia who were largely killed in a genocide by the German Empire between the years of 1884 and 1915. As someone who had no idea about the history that the play tackles, I found that Sept 2020: Another fine work from Sibblies Drury, 'We Are Proud to Present' tackles issues of storytelling; who can hold claim to what stories and the ways that histories are recounted to be told. As the title suggests, the play follows a group of actors creating and showing a presentation of the Herero and Nama of Namibia who were largely killed in a genocide by the German Empire between the years of 1884 and 1915. As someone who had no idea about the history that the play tackles, I found that Sibblies Drury was able to inform those uninitiated as the actors on stage struggle to come to terms with telling the story of a genocide from the only records available - records from the killers. Despite the dark subject matter, I found this play deeply comedic in the way that Sibblies Drury was able depict a group of people attempting to unpack a series of issues regarding race as they attempt to recount these ideas before an audience. I thought that the structuring of the play was really smart, the audience is privy to the rehearsal as well as the final show and by seeing them back to back I was able to really see what the actors were trying to depict in their presentation. In many ways, 'We Are Proud to Present' feels very much like a history play, in they way it recounts the current ways that we in the west discuss race. I can very much imagine this play being a time capsule of how we currently unpack these issues. This play was an excellent examination of these current ongoing discussions, showing the absolute idiocy and tragedy of them whilst also being able to educate and entertain. That is no small feat - I very much look forward to reading (or perhaps seeing) another of Sibblies Drury's plays.

  4. 4 out of 5

    KJ

    do you ever just get hit so hard with a piece of art that you just can't move do you ever just get hit so hard with a piece of art that you just can't move

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

    I think we can all agree that plays are meant to be seen rather than simply read. A play is best served by being performed, whether fully produced or merely given a staged reading. While some plays are captivating right off the page, others are not. Jackie Sibblies Drury's We Are Proud To Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884-1915 falls into the later category. It is a very awkward script to r I think we can all agree that plays are meant to be seen rather than simply read. A play is best served by being performed, whether fully produced or merely given a staged reading. While some plays are captivating right off the page, others are not. Jackie Sibblies Drury's We Are Proud To Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as Southwest Africa, From the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884-1915 falls into the later category. It is a very awkward script to read. This is one of those plays where we don't have character names, for the most part, instead having "Actor 1", "Actor 2", etc. Despite this naming practice, it is still very important to the piece that you remember the intended race of each of them. This is a piece that is ostensibly about race, after all, and much of the words they speak come from a place of being of a particular race - in this case, either just black or white. I found it necessary to keep a finger in the front where these "characters" are described for constant reference. Another aspect to the play that gets obliterated when only reading it is that thematically the play is about the creation of the presentation. The characters move back and forth from presenting to talking about their presentation. It requires two fairly distinct acting styles to help define when they are in one mode versus the other. Given the drawbacks of truly appreciating the experience of only reading this play, I refrain from giving it a rating. It wouldn't be fair to Ms. Drury or to her work.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emmanuel

    Incredibly engaging play following 6 actors who want to put on a play - or presentation more accurately - about the genocide of the African Herero tribe by the Germans in the early 20th century. The stage directions were unlike any I've ever seen, the intercutting of dialogue was brilliant, the characters were well-distinguished despite being given very similar names. But as engaging as it was, I didn't think it succeeded all that much, that the 6 actors succeeded that is, in bringing to life the Incredibly engaging play following 6 actors who want to put on a play - or presentation more accurately - about the genocide of the African Herero tribe by the Germans in the early 20th century. The stage directions were unlike any I've ever seen, the intercutting of dialogue was brilliant, the characters were well-distinguished despite being given very similar names. But as engaging as it was, I didn't think it succeeded all that much, that the 6 actors succeeded that is, in bringing to life the tragedy they'd so desperately wanted to bring to life. Their constant bickering and aggression highlighted the different ways in which history is often interpreted, especially when they pertain to a specific group of people and their suffering, but their actual presentation, I didn't think conveyed the subject matter well enough. Having said that, Drury is definitely a talented individual, the technical aspects of this play felt so refreshing, even though I was reading them, not seeing them play out in front of me, so that's an impressive feat in and of itself. I'll definitely keep an eye out for more of her stuff.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carlo Hengstler

    At first this play confused me but as it's witty dialogue progresses it reveals itself for what it truly is - a comment on the past, the lost aspects of human history and the nature of empathy. How can we ever recover the history of those on the short end of the colonial stick? Is our reality as we know it a product of an unfair distribution of power in the past? How can we even begin to empathise with something we know so little about? These are the questions this play poses and that is why it At first this play confused me but as it's witty dialogue progresses it reveals itself for what it truly is - a comment on the past, the lost aspects of human history and the nature of empathy. How can we ever recover the history of those on the short end of the colonial stick? Is our reality as we know it a product of an unfair distribution of power in the past? How can we even begin to empathise with something we know so little about? These are the questions this play poses and that is why it is important! Good read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    An incredibly clever and challenging play. I hope to see it performed someday.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    4.5*

  10. 4 out of 5

    Megan Reilly

    LOVED this - can't wait to design it this fall! LOVED this - can't wait to design it this fall!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zeba Clarke

    A clever, deliberately uncomfortable and thoughtful exploration of race, colonialism and theatre.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Murphy

    best play i've read in years best play i've read in years

  13. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Donnelly

    Very powerful piece, but like with most theater, looses something on the page. I recommend gathering friends to read it out loud or better yet find it performed near you!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Francis Bass

    Fantastic. This play is really engaging, overflowing with hilarious and painfully realistic actor-actor conflicts, big questions, and difficult arguments about how to tell stories, and how to present the history of a people who were almost entirely wiped out. Also, the stage directions are full of personality and make it a great read

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    A play every historian should read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cary S

    Brilliant!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donald Quist

    Masterful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Wonderful, creative, topical, incendiary play about representing the past and grappling with race and theater. Is it dangerous or a moral obligation to tell the stories of those whose records have been lost to time? Can we perform 'the other' in theater without bringing ourselves to a part? Can a group freaking collaborate? Wonderful, creative, topical, incendiary play about representing the past and grappling with race and theater. Is it dangerous or a moral obligation to tell the stories of those whose records have been lost to time? Can we perform 'the other' in theater without bringing ourselves to a part? Can a group freaking collaborate?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This has made me stop in my tracks and think for days now. It is surprising, innovative and intensely real. Thank you to Jack Scaletta for recommending that I read it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sio

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily Kelly

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Erwin-Longstaff

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Mills

  27. 4 out of 5

    Austen Walker

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dan Caffrey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amber Riggle

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