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March/April 2014, Volume 126, No. 3&4, #712 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Kent Bash CONTENT: Novella "The Lightness of the Movement" by Pat MacEwen Novelets "Apprentice" by Jon DeCles "Draft 31″ by Michael Libling Short Stories "Collar" by Leo Vladimirsky "A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly" by Oliver Buckram "Hark, The Wicked Witches Sing" by Ron Goulart "A Stretch March/April 2014, Volume 126, No. 3&4, #712 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Kent Bash CONTENT: Novella "The Lightness of the Movement" by Pat MacEwen Novelets "Apprentice" by Jon DeCles "Draft 31″ by Michael Libling Short Stories "Collar" by Leo Vladimirsky "A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly" by Oliver Buckram "Hark, The Wicked Witches Sing" by Ron Goulart "A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide" by Sarah Pinsker "Byzantine History 101″ by Albert E. Cowdrey "Albion Upon The Rock" by Daniel Marcus "The Uncertain Past" by Ted White "Butterscotch" by D.M. Armstrong "I Said I Was Sorry Didn’t I" by Gordon Eklund "Our Vegetable Love" by Rob Chilson DEPARTMENTS "Films: Stalking Love On The Time-space Continuum" by Kathi Maio


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March/April 2014, Volume 126, No. 3&4, #712 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Kent Bash CONTENT: Novella "The Lightness of the Movement" by Pat MacEwen Novelets "Apprentice" by Jon DeCles "Draft 31″ by Michael Libling Short Stories "Collar" by Leo Vladimirsky "A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly" by Oliver Buckram "Hark, The Wicked Witches Sing" by Ron Goulart "A Stretch March/April 2014, Volume 126, No. 3&4, #712 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Kent Bash CONTENT: Novella "The Lightness of the Movement" by Pat MacEwen Novelets "Apprentice" by Jon DeCles "Draft 31″ by Michael Libling Short Stories "Collar" by Leo Vladimirsky "A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly" by Oliver Buckram "Hark, The Wicked Witches Sing" by Ron Goulart "A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide" by Sarah Pinsker "Byzantine History 101″ by Albert E. Cowdrey "Albion Upon The Rock" by Daniel Marcus "The Uncertain Past" by Ted White "Butterscotch" by D.M. Armstrong "I Said I Was Sorry Didn’t I" by Gordon Eklund "Our Vegetable Love" by Rob Chilson DEPARTMENTS "Films: Stalking Love On The Time-space Continuum" by Kathi Maio

30 review for Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2014 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #712)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Another free short story. You can find it here: http://www.sarahpinsker.com/highway1/ I'm assuming there's some sort of metaphor & point to it. Well written, but I just don't get it. I certainly didn't dislike it, but can't give it a higher rating. Another free short story. You can find it here: http://www.sarahpinsker.com/highway1/ I'm assuming there's some sort of metaphor & point to it. Well written, but I just don't get it. I certainly didn't dislike it, but can't give it a higher rating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    As well as the informative ‘Departments’ there are loads of stories in ‘The Magazine of Fantasy And Science Fiction’, divided on the contents page, as usual, into novella, novelette and short stories. Arbitrarily, I will section them into Science Fiction, fun and fantasy. These categories are not mutually exclusive. This month’s novella is ‘The Lightness Of The Movement’ by Pat MacEwen and its genuine Science Fiction with two human females studying the alien Neons on Hrallsted’s World. What do yo As well as the informative ‘Departments’ there are loads of stories in ‘The Magazine of Fantasy And Science Fiction’, divided on the contents page, as usual, into novella, novelette and short stories. Arbitrarily, I will section them into Science Fiction, fun and fantasy. These categories are not mutually exclusive. This month’s novella is ‘The Lightness Of The Movement’ by Pat MacEwen and its genuine Science Fiction with two human females studying the alien Neons on Hrallsted’s World. What do you do in the future if you’re a failed ballet dancer majoring in anthropology? The answer for Shannon, our first-person narrator, is to go to another planet and put on a celluloid ’costume’ with some armour capability, lots of built-in sensors and, most importantly, the ability to receive the amorous attentions of Neon males. To get this you have to do an elaborate mating dance first. Shannon is doing her thesis but the boss is Niera, the lady in the ship orbiting overhead. The theme is what ‘Star Trek’ called the Prime Directive: no open contact with a non-technological species. Unfortunately, like James T. Kirk, Shannon is rubbish at not interfering and also applies her human morality to non-humans with exciting results. Her heart’s in the right place and it’s a very entertaining and well-written story. ‘Collar’ by Leo Vladimirsky is about a man trying to get a job. This involves a long and hazardous swim from the east coast of the USA out to factory ships in international waters. The story is told from the perspective of Tom, an escort for workers whose fee is a percentage of their wages if they get a contract. A very well-constructed yarn in which the world scene is effectively conveyed in conversation and shows a future all too realistic and bleak. After the bleak future, you might consider ‘The Uncertain Past’ which features the assassination of President Kennedy, not, on this occasion, considered as a downhill motor race. To test a new theory of time, some researchers go back to watch the murder but each one sees different things happening. Possibly they are entering parallel universes or even creating them by their presence. Ted White’s story is neatly resolved in a dramatic conclusion at another major historical event but I‘m not sure the issue was settled. In any case, it provided an interesting space-time theory and believable characters. I believe Robert A. Heinlein wrote the first account of an inter-generational colonising starship on which everyone has forgotten the original mission and reverted to a primitive state. His story ‘Universe’ is a classic but in ‘Albion Upon The Rock’, Daniel Marcus visits the same territory. The crew of the ship have names that refer back to their origins: Sandy Ecosystems, Eden Security and Sergei Navigation, even though they are now a hunter-gatherer culture in the hydroponics decks. Jamal Operations’ wife is about to have a baby, so soon he must take the long journey, scale the cliffs to weightlessness and let the wind take him. One life, one death is the rule that keeps the balance. As Jamal goes about his business, the ship with a self-aware artificial intelligence, encounters a multi-dimensional being spread across space-time that takes an interest in it. The cosmic and the human are neatly twined in a charming story which somehow avoids the sense of futility that such material might engender in another writer. I think I liked it as much as ‘Universe’ and I like ‘Universe’ a lot. A simple farm boy gets his arm mangled in the combine harvester and has an efficient but ugly prosthetic fitted in its place with a chip wired to his brain. The arm does not think it is an arm, however, it thinks it is ‘A Stretch Of Highway Two Lanes Wide’ in Colorado. This is definitely weird but quite effective in an odd way. Apparently, Sarah Pinsker has been submitting stories to MofF&SF since she was twelve and I’m glad she finally succeeded with this quirky little gem. ‘Hark The Wicked Witches Sing’ is by Ron Goulart, who generally has fun with his creations rather than taking them too seriously. The title of the story is also the title of a horror musical written by Hix, a B-movie writer in forties Hollywood. Apparently, there are a number of stories about Hix but this is the first one I’ve come across. The B-movie titles scattered through it were entertaining and the yarn capered along amusingly for a while but the ending, while leaving room for a sequel, was a bit flat. An issue of MofF&SF without Albert E. Cowdrey is like a day without rain in England – very rare. Last time, he was in serious mode. This time he returns to comedy with ‘Byzantine History 101’, a sequel to ‘The Woman In The Moon’ which appeared in the May/June 2013 issue of this magazine. In that yarn, Professor Threefoot had agreed to let his daughter’s useless husband, Adam, write his authorised biography. Now his grandson, another Adam, who follows in his late father’s footsteps so far as utility goes, has hooked up with an antique dealer called Terrence, a man who can give Threefoot a run for his money when it comes to selfish, ruthless pragmatism. Obviously, such a homosexual pairing cannot carry Threefoot’s DNA into the next generation but he has plans. Very entertaining, as usual with Cowdrey. Oliver Buckram is becoming almost as much an MofF&SF regular as Albert E. Cowdrey and is just as welcome. This issue’s offering is ‘A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly’. The story is set in a busy port and the odd title is a reflection of the culture of beetle-like creatures who conduct all mercantile negotiations according to classic scenarios such as ‘clever servant outwits rich foreigners’ or ‘a son slayed unknowingly by command of divinity’. Treya is a human negotiator and her ex-lover, Neb, is her rival in bidding for a rich contract. The title is a neat plot summary. This is not quite as good as Buckram’s previous stories but, as they were brilliant, that’s not much of a criticism. Very good. Even though I usually like everything explained in a story I’ll forgive Gordon Eklund for ‘I Said I Was Sorry, Didn’t I’ because it’s such good fun. The story is set in present-day America. Our hero has caused the end of the universe, which is to happen shortly, and is therefore unpopular and has to wear a false beard to avoid public attention. His wife kicks him out, but he has three sisters who may put up with him. Like Terrence and Threefoot from Cowdrey’s story, he’s not very loveable or politically correct but he is amusing. From fun to fantasy. Arthur and Alexis are childless and doing okay when suddenly she gets pregnant and he has to deal with it. ‘Butterscotch’ is a fantasy because it features ‘travelers’, odd creatures that have appeared lately, moving about the land aimlessly. They seem to be made of vacuum cleaner waste and leave a small trail, ‘the way a burning cigarette dragged along the asphalt might.’ Nobody knows where they came from. The slightest blow reduces them to dust. A traveller appears in the garden when Alexis becomes pregnant and her pregnancy becomes difficult. Is there a connection? The mother-in-law from Hell moves in to help. She is ‘built like a toy train, squat and bulky’ and smells ‘like a mixture of stew and lingering aerosols’. D.M. Armstrong’s deft use of language makes his interesting and honest story – honest about fatherhood – very effective. ‘Draft 31’ by Michael Libling is one of those stories where telling what it’s about spoils the ending, so I won’t. It opens with a small town doctor having to treat the son of his former high school sweetheart and from there on develops nicely. The narrative viewpoint switches from time to time, which I don’t mind at all, but it’s unusual nowadays, forbidden by the arbiters of literature. In this case, it was probably essential. Normally, I like things more clear-cut but the vagueness on this one worked somehow. There are two very good fairy tales in this issue. The first, a novelette, is ‘Apprentice’ by Jon DeCles in which Dafyd, the difficult stable boy, is assigned, by his fellow villagers to serve the local wizard as payment for that worthy getting rid of a gryphon. This turns out well at first because the wizard is quite a kindly, forgiving old fellow, certainly nicer than Dafyd’s previous masters or his parents, who got rid of him at the first opportunity. All the elements of the tale come together in a splendid conclusion which, happily, leaves the way open for a sequel. I hope Jon DeCles has one in mind. The other fairy tale, ’Our Vegetable Love’ by Rob Chilson, features sentient trees, with which we are all familiar now. These don’t talk like C.S. Lewis, booming, but rather in a ‘woody groan’. They also speak in a northern English dialect. I won’t give away the secret of the trees’ sentience but it’s very clever and the story of Grandpa Tree’s interactions with his naughty granddaughter on Bonfire Day is great. In mellow middle age, I am coming to like this kind of thing, partly because I am fond of the omniscient narrator, forbidden in most modern fiction but allowed in this particular sub-genre. ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy And Science Fiction’ features faery frequently and many of these tales, slightly edited for adult content in some cases, could be put into a good anthology for children. Reading and reviewing this not inconsiderable quantity of fiction every two months takes a lot of time but I don’t begrudge it. ‘The Magazine Of Fantasy And Science Fiction’ continues to deliver the goods and sometimes, the greats. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    A sci-fi story about a young farmer who gets a prosthetic arm which thinks it is a road. The story dragged in some places but it was an interesting concept.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darrin

    This was not one of the better issues. The couple main novellas/novelettes were not very strong in my opinion but the short stories were, for the most part, pretty good.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark Pedigo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Jon DeCles “Apprentice” - fun fantasy story Michael Libling “Draft 31” - creepy supernatural X-Files type story Daniel Markus “Albion Upon the Rock” - Read it carefully. Expects the reader to be familiar with SF. Doesn’t spell it out. D.M. Armstrong “Butterscotch” - Gordon Ecklund “I Said I was Sorry, Didn’t I” - Entertaining story about entitlement.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    March/April 2014 Fantasy & Science Fiction If you want every story to have a happy ending, this isn't the issue for you. Collar - Leo Vladimirsky 14 pages Good. A future where jobs are hard to come by. People are forced to try to get work in offshore factory boats, but they must evade the authorities first. A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly - Oliver Buckram 10 pages Very Good. Treya is a translator and is trying to get her client a great deal with a fishing boat, but the alien fishermen b March/April 2014 Fantasy & Science Fiction If you want every story to have a happy ending, this isn't the issue for you. Collar - Leo Vladimirsky 14 pages Good. A future where jobs are hard to come by. People are forced to try to get work in offshore factory boats, but they must evade the authorities first. A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly - Oliver Buckram 10 pages Very Good. Treya is a translator and is trying to get her client a great deal with a fishing boat, but the alien fishermen bring in another bidder. The Lightness of Movement - Pat MacEwan 48 pages Very Good. Shannon, the student, and Niera are studying the Neons. Inexperiencd Shannon is on the planet in her suit that mimics a Neon. She is in constant contact with Niera, physically unable to be the legs, aboard ship . Hark, the Wicked Witches Sing - Ron Goulart 15 pages Good. Somewhat witty dialog. Classic Goulart A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide - Sarah Pinsker 12 pages Very Good. A mechanical arm is giving Andy an extra perception. Byzantine History 101 - Albert E. Cowdrey. 20 pages Excellent. Terrance is marrying Adam. Professor Threefoot despises his grandson Adam, but also wants his legacy to go on. Albion upon the Rock - Daniel Marcus. 9 pages Very Good. A colony ship has missed it's intended planet. A post-posthuman talks with the damaged machine intelligence running the ship. Meanwhile aboard ship life goes on with the limited resources of the ship. Apprentice - Jon Decles 20 pages Excellent/VG. Dafyd gets a job with a wizard. Eventually becoming an apprentice. The Uncertain Past - Ted White. 11 pages. Excellent. A good twist on time travel. Butterscotch - David M. Armstrong. 19 pages Good/vg. Alexis is having a rough pregnancy and it's also taking it's toll on Arthur. Possibly due to a traveler. I Said I Was Sorry Didn't I - Gordon Eklund 15 pages. Good/fair. Wendy's husband did something that will end the universe. The story follows him through visits to his three sisters. Our Vegatable Love - Rob Chilson 12 pages. Very Good plus. Agnes is feeling slighted because she is being treated like a little girl and she is grown up now. She lives on a world of soul-sucking trees. This was found out because some of the trees had grabbed individuals, but Agnes' grandfather willingly went when he could no long contribute to the community. Draft 31 - Michael Libling. 22 pages. Very Good plus. When his wife is laid off and the bills are mounting Doc Caplan comes back to his hometown bringing his family. He encounters his high school flame, who asks him to talk with her son who remembers things that just haven't happened.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Lubell

    This issue had a number of weird stories. There were no really bad ones but none that will go on my hugo ballot next year. Collar is an interesting story. Congress passed a law that said anything sold in the US can't be made on foreign soil, so the Chinese set up factory ships and Americans who want jobs have to swim to them. The plot is not much more than this setting and the coyote-equivalent who guides the swimmers for a fee. A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprising- Trade deals with aliens ar This issue had a number of weird stories. There were no really bad ones but none that will go on my hugo ballot next year. Collar is an interesting story. Congress passed a law that said anything sold in the US can't be made on foreign soil, so the Chinese set up factory ships and Americans who want jobs have to swim to them. The plot is not much more than this setting and the coyote-equivalent who guides the swimmers for a fee. A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprising- Trade deals with aliens are conducted through drama and the human negotiators have to be able to recognize the script. The ending is a bit of a twist. The Lightness of Being - This is my favorite of the issue. A grad student studies alien courtship by donning a robot body designed to look and act like them, but breaks every rule of anthropology much to the annoyance of her mentor who is still in orbit but communicating via radio. Hark the Wicked Witches Sing - This was supposed to be funny, but I didn't find it so and the ending is a bit of a cop out. A Stretch of Highway - This was a weird story. A man gets a supermodern artificial arm, but he thinks it is convinced it is a piece of highway in Colorado. Weird, but interesting. Byzantine History - This is not about ancient Greeks but an unpleasant main character trying to cheat his boyfriend's grandfather by faking an heir. Albion upon the Rock - If you are a generation starship who went crazy and missed the destination such that the primitive humans who ride in you have to sacrifice the father when a new baby is born, it is better to stay crazy than to be cured. I found it interesting. Apprentice- Standard fantasy of the sorcerer's apprentice type. Apprentice meddles in magic beyond what he should and this time the wizard isn't quite able to save the day. This was good traditional fantasy. The Uncertain Past - This is a time travel story but the time travelers keep visiting alternate versions of history until they get the idea to send two at once. It was okay until the ending which made no sense. Butterscotch - Strange ghostly travelers start appearing and some speculate they may represent people's doubts. I thought the ending was rather heavy handed. I said I was sorry, didn't I - The main character did something (never explained) that is somehow causing the end of the world. I found this a muddled mess. In real life, he would have been killed. Our Vegetable Love - Grandfather Tree saves little girl from fire. Draft 31 - This was another weird story as people's history gets rewritten at different times and not everyone remembers the same thing. I found this interesting, but it is another one of those weird unexplained things happen stories.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Well, this was certainly an interesting issue. If not the most tremendous of stories, they certainly included a range. The novella in this issue, "The Lightness of the Movement" was fascinating from start to finish, although the inability of the protagonist to let things be became rather fast. I appreciated this tale built around alien biology, courtship and mating rituals. Despite the heavy handedness of the themes behind "Butterscotch", I enjoyed the inventiveness of its setup and the complex e Well, this was certainly an interesting issue. If not the most tremendous of stories, they certainly included a range. The novella in this issue, "The Lightness of the Movement" was fascinating from start to finish, although the inability of the protagonist to let things be became rather fast. I appreciated this tale built around alien biology, courtship and mating rituals. Despite the heavy handedness of the themes behind "Butterscotch", I enjoyed the inventiveness of its setup and the complex emotions faced by the husband in trying to make sense of the situation. "Draft 21" had a delicious creepiness to it that I quite liked. The serious stories of the issue are broken up by Buckram's "A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly", which I found myself enjoying immensely, wondering how things would work out. Goulart's take on lightness failed for me. As a cross between comedy, private detective, and fantasy genres, it didn't work on any of them. Cowdrey's story in this issue is another of the less serious ones in the issue, and though I thought it worked far better than the story that preceded this sequel, it still felt inconsequential, a throwaway. I used to greet Cowdrey's name with happy anticipation, but his high output ends up in every issue it seems ever since the magazine unfortunately switched to ALL 'double' issues. I've come to realize I guess how hit and miss his work can be, at least for me of course. Most of the other stories in this issue were unmemorable. Normally "Apprentice" would have been a story I'd feel ho-hum over, a well-written, but very standard sort of tale. However, with this particular collection, the familiarity of a tale like it became really appreciated. For with its varied content, this issue contains the very memorable (in a bad way) story by Eklund. I know Eklund only by name on some old Star Trek novel(s) sitting on my shelf that I've not read yet. I wonder if the title to his story here is simply the response that can then be cut and pasted into the response to letters the story's inclusion may well generate. Rarely do I not finish a story. In fact, I used to be able to say never. Then this. Along with the horrid cover for this edition it made for a horrid start and (near) close.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Boku

    This issue has some great stories on what it is to be human. My favorites include: A stretch of Highway Two Miles Long - Sarah Pinsker Apprentice - John DeCles A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly - Oliver Buckram Albion Upon the Rocks - Daniel Marcus I Said I Was Sorry Didn't I - Gordon Eklund Our Vegetable Love - Rob Chilson Draft 31 - Michael Libling Over all a very good issue. Read my full review here. This issue has some great stories on what it is to be human. My favorites include: A stretch of Highway Two Miles Long - Sarah Pinsker Apprentice - John DeCles A Struggle Between Rivals Ends Surprisingly - Oliver Buckram Albion Upon the Rocks - Daniel Marcus I Said I Was Sorry Didn't I - Gordon Eklund Our Vegetable Love - Rob Chilson Draft 31 - Michael Libling Over all a very good issue. Read my full review here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Misha

    I really loved this strange little tale about a man who loses an arm in a farming accident, and receives a prosthetic that thinks it's the titular stretch of highway two lanes wide in Colorado. Pinsker* uses the story's science fictional conceit to tell a very human and moving story about the ways that we adjust — or are incapable of adjusting — to a significant loss. *In the interest of full disclosure she's a friend, but that in no way affects my opinion of the story. She'd expect nothing less I really loved this strange little tale about a man who loses an arm in a farming accident, and receives a prosthetic that thinks it's the titular stretch of highway two lanes wide in Colorado. Pinsker* uses the story's science fictional conceit to tell a very human and moving story about the ways that we adjust — or are incapable of adjusting — to a significant loss. *In the interest of full disclosure she's a friend, but that in no way affects my opinion of the story. She'd expect nothing less than intellectual honesty in a review. My love for the story is real.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Otavio Galileu

    2 Stars This was such a strange story, and not strange in an unexpected and cool sort of way, more like a "WTF, why am I reading this?" sort of way. I kept expecting something more deep to happen, or an ending that would validate the strangeness, but nope. To be fair though, it was an interesting concept, but the execution felt strange and pointless. 2 Stars This was such a strange story, and not strange in an unexpected and cool sort of way, more like a "WTF, why am I reading this?" sort of way. I kept expecting something more deep to happen, or an ending that would validate the strangeness, but nope. To be fair though, it was an interesting concept, but the execution felt strange and pointless.

  12. 4 out of 5

    George Heintzelman

    An excellent issue. No duds, and several really good stories. My favorites were the novella, "The Lightness of the Movement", by Pat McEwen -- a fascinating tale of parenthood in a very unusual place; "Apprentice", by John DeCles, "Our Vegetable Love", by Rob Chilson... But the whole issue was enjoyable. An excellent issue. No duds, and several really good stories. My favorites were the novella, "The Lightness of the Movement", by Pat McEwen -- a fascinating tale of parenthood in a very unusual place; "Apprentice", by John DeCles, "Our Vegetable Love", by Rob Chilson... But the whole issue was enjoyable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Rew

    In the near future, a young farmer loses his arm in a combine. He is fitted with a cybernetic arm, and a chip installed in his brain controls it. Unfortunately, the arm seems to have a mind of its own. It wants to be a stretch of highway in Colorado... An intriguing idea. This story is a finalist for the 2014 Nebula Award for Short Stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob Port

    Very good issue. Excellent stories - particularly Draft 31 and Albion on the Rock. Exception was the Lightness of the Movement which had an interesting setting but ultimately left me unhappy that I spent the time to slog through it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Replogle

    Some very good stories. I particularly liked Albion upon the Rock by Daniel Marcus. An alien entity comes upon a derelict generation ship. Quite interesting. Also, the Uncertain Past by Ted White: a bit different concept of the effects of time travel.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    A beautifully well-written short mental vacation to the not-so-distant future Colorado farmlands. If you haven't read Pinsker's work yet, you'd better hurry up and consume everything out there. She's fantastic. A beautifully well-written short mental vacation to the not-so-distant future Colorado farmlands. If you haven't read Pinsker's work yet, you'd better hurry up and consume everything out there. She's fantastic.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Meran

    Review later

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A quirky story about a man-machine interface that takes a weird turn. I listened to this on the Escape Pod podcast.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Mccracken

    Do Androids dream of ... roads? A fun little short story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michele Maakestad

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  22. 4 out of 5

    Benito Jr.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marc

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (Kalanadi)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ken Mixon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zardoz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tad Kilgore

  30. 4 out of 5

    Enrico Accenti

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