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The House of the Vampire (1907) poetic thriller by George S. Viereck. This homoerotic novel is considered by some as the first known one about a gay vampire. It is also one of the first psychic vampire stories. " It is precisely this curious notion of the psychic vampire that Reginald Clarke epitomizes in George Svlvester Viereck's The House of the Vampire, where the monste The House of the Vampire (1907) poetic thriller by George S. Viereck. This homoerotic novel is considered by some as the first known one about a gay vampire. It is also one of the first psychic vampire stories. " It is precisely this curious notion of the psychic vampire that Reginald Clarke epitomizes in George Svlvester Viereck's The House of the Vampire, where the monster is a homosexual roue who robs his lover-victims of their vitality." -- Dayneford's library: American homosexual writing, 1900-1913 by James Gifford


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The House of the Vampire (1907) poetic thriller by George S. Viereck. This homoerotic novel is considered by some as the first known one about a gay vampire. It is also one of the first psychic vampire stories. " It is precisely this curious notion of the psychic vampire that Reginald Clarke epitomizes in George Svlvester Viereck's The House of the Vampire, where the monste The House of the Vampire (1907) poetic thriller by George S. Viereck. This homoerotic novel is considered by some as the first known one about a gay vampire. It is also one of the first psychic vampire stories. " It is precisely this curious notion of the psychic vampire that Reginald Clarke epitomizes in George Svlvester Viereck's The House of the Vampire, where the monster is a homosexual roue who robs his lover-victims of their vitality." -- Dayneford's library: American homosexual writing, 1900-1913 by James Gifford

30 review for The House of the Vampire -- FREE Audiobook Download [Annotated]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    3.5* This book is a very different approach to a vampire story. There is no darkness, eerie and creepy atmosphere or any blood drinking associated with the usual vampire books. Still I enjoyed reading this novella as the writing kept me interested and the idea of this book was in a way scary though not in the conventional way. Reginald Clarke is the star of any function he attends and everyone's eyes follows him wherever he goes. He is a great writer and an orator, handsome and proud. When young E 3.5* This book is a very different approach to a vampire story. There is no darkness, eerie and creepy atmosphere or any blood drinking associated with the usual vampire books. Still I enjoyed reading this novella as the writing kept me interested and the idea of this book was in a way scary though not in the conventional way. Reginald Clarke is the star of any function he attends and everyone's eyes follows him wherever he goes. He is a great writer and an orator, handsome and proud. When young Ernest, an aspiring writer gets the opportunity to stay with Clarke and be mentored, he is thrilled. But what he experiences there is totally unexpected. I don't want to give away any spoilers. I would definitely reccomend this book because first of all its small, secondly its interesting. Most importantly, its a vampire book! Who can resist one?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Osie

    As you likely already know, this was one of the first psychic vampire stories ever. Somehow it has become a rumor that it is an erotic novel and features bisexual characters. It doesn’t, so don’t bother if that’s the only reason you want to read it. There are a few scenes that come off homoerotic, and you get the feeling that Ernest, as well as Reginald Clarke, are somewhat effeminate, but they are both definitely straight. It is a little slow paced at first; however, I feel it builds up rather As you likely already know, this was one of the first psychic vampire stories ever. Somehow it has become a rumor that it is an erotic novel and features bisexual characters. It doesn’t, so don’t bother if that’s the only reason you want to read it. There are a few scenes that come off homoerotic, and you get the feeling that Ernest, as well as Reginald Clarke, are somewhat effeminate, but they are both definitely straight. It is a little slow paced at first; however, I feel it builds up rather well, culminating in a surprising and very well executed ending. It is also very quotable. One of my favorite lines is when Reginald Clarke spoke of Balzac and unwittingly gave away a clue to his own nature: “He (Balzac) must have purified the atmosphere around him for miles, by bringing all the evil that was floating in the air or slumbering in men’s souls to the point of his pen.” As to the style, I would say it’s like a mix of Bret Easton Ellis and Oscar Wilde. A great example is a conversation between Ernest (the protagonist) and his old friend, Jack, about two women they had met earlier that night: “Susie, was that her name?” “Yes.” “So she had a name?” “Of course.” “She shouldn’t. It should be a number.” “They may not be pillars of society; still they’re human.” “Yes,” said Ernest, “that is the most horrible part of it.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    With homosexual and supernatural elements, I guess one would expect something either exceptionally thrilling or totally boring... Actually, the plot was interesting, Viereck's writing does keep one asking 'what next', however, I thought the ending a tad bit disappointing. The character of Reginald Clarke was fine but maybe he could have been a bit scarier, and Ernest, well I felt sort of sorry for him at the end... Here it is online: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Hou... With homosexual and supernatural elements, I guess one would expect something either exceptionally thrilling or totally boring... Actually, the plot was interesting, Viereck's writing does keep one asking 'what next', however, I thought the ending a tad bit disappointing. The character of Reginald Clarke was fine but maybe he could have been a bit scarier, and Ernest, well I felt sort of sorry for him at the end... Here it is online: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Hou...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    Disappointing. Billed as a vampire story, not so scary, unless you are a poet or something. The "vampire" steals your creativity, your work before it is published. He is an equal opportunity thief because he steals from men and women but mostly men. No death, but madness or brokeness. No chance of being made into a vampire. Again, disappointing. Read on iPhone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I only read this novel because the ebook site I downloaded it from a) listed it as possibly the first gay vampire novel and b) listed the author as a nazi apologist, which does seem a perplexing combination! The novel is reasonably well written but shows its age. When compared against a more modern vampire novel (or really any novel) its pace is plodding. The one redeeming feature of the novel is that the vampire isn't a classic vampire and though you manage to guess his power within the first fe I only read this novel because the ebook site I downloaded it from a) listed it as possibly the first gay vampire novel and b) listed the author as a nazi apologist, which does seem a perplexing combination! The novel is reasonably well written but shows its age. When compared against a more modern vampire novel (or really any novel) its pace is plodding. The one redeeming feature of the novel is that the vampire isn't a classic vampire and though you manage to guess his power within the first few pages it was just different enough for me to finish the book. As for being the first gay vampire novel... maybe you could read between the lines about the relationship between the vampire and his target or between him and his friend, but no I wouldn't count it as the first gay vampire novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mirvan. Ereon

    I read this book so fast and I really liked it. It as very unique and entertaining. Although it classifies itself as the first gay vampire novel, I do not think it is gay enough. However, I really love the psychic vampire concept and the part where the vampire can suck more than just blood, they can even suck your minds and souls in diverse ways. Truly a wonderful gem that I really like. It reminded me of Dorian Gray actually. I hope it was longer though but then, it is perfect already in its ow I read this book so fast and I really liked it. It as very unique and entertaining. Although it classifies itself as the first gay vampire novel, I do not think it is gay enough. However, I really love the psychic vampire concept and the part where the vampire can suck more than just blood, they can even suck your minds and souls in diverse ways. Truly a wonderful gem that I really like. It reminded me of Dorian Gray actually. I hope it was longer though but then, it is perfect already in its own way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steve Goble

    Horror is, perhaps, not the proper category for this book, but it is close enough. The tale features a vampire of a different sort, and is told in brief chapters with a dream-like air. It moves swiftly, despite the languid dialogue. It is an excellent read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Extinction

    Well, this was a let down...somehow, January is really not my best reading month apart from Circe...XD Anyway... This was beautifully written and an amazing fit for a vampire story, as expected from books of the era. I was excited at first, thinking I finally found another vampire story on par with the atmosphere and the feeling that Vampire Chronicles and Vampire The Masquerade RPG give me. But in the end, that did not turn out to be the case...all because of one single decision of one single cha Well, this was a let down...somehow, January is really not my best reading month apart from Circe...XD Anyway... This was beautifully written and an amazing fit for a vampire story, as expected from books of the era. I was excited at first, thinking I finally found another vampire story on par with the atmosphere and the feeling that Vampire Chronicles and Vampire The Masquerade RPG give me. But in the end, that did not turn out to be the case...all because of one single decision of one single character. In the end, this, like many other old books, did not age well, for the story is much too simplistic and generic. And honestly, this is not a blood-sucking vampire, so there is also that, but I did enjoy this different aspect to this vampire for it worked well and I could still see Vampire The Masquerade type of vampires personified in this one, yet...the main character just had to make a dumb decision and mess it all up. The decision that was made... I blame the author for, because it made no sense (view spoiler)[In the end, the main character got ahold of his stolen monuscript, but instead of taking it in that instance, he just left it there!! Then he met up with the woman he loves, realized he made a dumb decision and returned for the monuscript....unable to take it, he still stayed in the same home as the vampire which in the end became his demize. This was dumb af!!! If he took the monuscript since the start, which is common sense, things could have been done differently (with still the same result), but since they were not...this was a disappointment. (hide spoiler)] So yeah...things could have gone differently, yet they didn't. How sad. It had the potential, but it was lost. Still, I really enjoyed the writing and the rich description, but unfortunately, as it always is, that is not enough. Still giving it a generous 3 stars though.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Agnes

    The ending was pretty chilling.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well what can I say, I was expecting a little more from a book called house of vampire some more paranormal and horror factor, this book seemed to lack that but it feels intentional like the author was trying to write the book on a more psych level rather than a physical level. The vampire in this book didn't want blood, guts and gore he wanted something different his victims mind, his victims thoughts and well his victims life I guess. I'm not sure whether I really liked this book or disliked i Well what can I say, I was expecting a little more from a book called house of vampire some more paranormal and horror factor, this book seemed to lack that but it feels intentional like the author was trying to write the book on a more psych level rather than a physical level. The vampire in this book didn't want blood, guts and gore he wanted something different his victims mind, his victims thoughts and well his victims life I guess. I'm not sure whether I really liked this book or disliked it merely I was confused and left questioning throughout the first half of the book. This book seemed more written for it literature aspect than the horror aspect of it which I'm dissapointed by as that's essentially what I was looking for so maybe that's my fault for entirely looking at the wrong book but I just felt that this was a story to show off language and psych and philosophy rather than the horror of vampires, now I didn't expect the whole gore fest of blood and guts but i expected more than this book delivered. The language and the way it was delivered was beautiful, slightly older fashioned maybe but beautiful in itself. I can't say I connected with the characters at all because I couldn't really I felt I never got to know them enough to relate, I felt sorry for Ernest having all his ideas eaten by a vampire never realising then led to believe because of his artistic character he was maybe losing his mind, rather than be able to see the truth that Clarke was feeding upon his ideas.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Flash Gordon

    One of the first psychic vampire novels of its time - where the vampire feeds off of more than just blood - The House of the Vampire is an early classic in its genre. Republished in this new edition, this Victorian novel operates in the continuum of life and death. What has been can be again, though often terribly transformed. Energetically inventive and infused with a relish for the supernatural, especially the trappings of the dark, The House of the Vampire delivers a horror which we know does One of the first psychic vampire novels of its time - where the vampire feeds off of more than just blood - The House of the Vampire is an early classic in its genre. Republished in this new edition, this Victorian novel operates in the continuum of life and death. What has been can be again, though often terribly transformed. Energetically inventive and infused with a relish for the supernatural, especially the trappings of the dark, The House of the Vampire delivers a horror which we know does not - but none the less conceivably might - exist and threaten ourselves. Blurring the lines between fact and fiction, The House of the Vampire is considered a classic among Victorian Gothic stories. He felt the presence of the hand of Reginald Clarke - unmistakably - groping in his brain as if searching for something that had still escaped him. He tried to move, to cry out, but his limbs were paralysed. When, by a superhuman effort, he at last succeeded in shaking off the numbness that held him enchained, he awoke just in time to see a figure, that of a man, disappearing in the wall that separated Reginald's apartments from his room.... The House of the Vampire

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mohsin Khan

    It is hard not to be drawn by originality, and "The House of the Vampire" is anything but unoriginal. Potential readers are warned not to confuse this book for a storyline akin to one of those superficial twilight books. This book is NOT about a silly teenager that falls for a charming vampire. In addition, moving on to the opposite end of the spectrum, this book is nothing like Bram Stoker's Dracula. The House of the Vampire is..... well, simply put, nothing like any vampire story you know. The It is hard not to be drawn by originality, and "The House of the Vampire" is anything but unoriginal. Potential readers are warned not to confuse this book for a storyline akin to one of those superficial twilight books. This book is NOT about a silly teenager that falls for a charming vampire. In addition, moving on to the opposite end of the spectrum, this book is nothing like Bram Stoker's Dracula. The House of the Vampire is..... well, simply put, nothing like any vampire story you know. The premise of the story screams out originality because it provides something much more than the exhaustively used paradigm of blood-sucking vampires. The vampire portrayed in this book is...unusually different. Feeding on blood to survive is not central to its existence, since it is highly evolved. What makes the vampire relentless, formidable and outright creepy is that it feeds on the human psyche. If you want to read an original vampire story, embedded in a dark gothic Victorian setting, then there really is no excuse for you not to read this one. It will surely keep you entertained. 4/5 stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Skylark

    I thought this one was pretty crummy. It's from 1907 and described as the "first gay vampire novel", but its not really a vampire or gay. He's a "psychic vampire", so he just makes people around him tired instead of sucking blood from them, and people get would have gotten tired on their own anyway, it would just take longer. And don't expect anything sexy at all; this is modest even by 1907 standards. The vampire is popular and lots of people hang around him. Before video games came out, guys d I thought this one was pretty crummy. It's from 1907 and described as the "first gay vampire novel", but its not really a vampire or gay. He's a "psychic vampire", so he just makes people around him tired instead of sucking blood from them, and people get would have gotten tired on their own anyway, it would just take longer. And don't expect anything sexy at all; this is modest even by 1907 standards. The vampire is popular and lots of people hang around him. Before video games came out, guys did the same things when they hung out as girls do now, which is basically just sitting around and moving from distraction to distraction. If you want to read a book that i read more recently, you're better off reading Nancy drew and the secret of the Old Clock.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    What a fun surprise! I'm not really into the vampire thing, but this was a particularly interesting (I thought) view of vampirism from very early in the 20th century. (I don't think it would contain any insights that would be too revelatory for somebody past their 20s, say, but still.) I'm considering using it with a lower-level literature class. It was actually good enough that I went looking for other works by Viereck and discovered (probably on wikipedia on somewhere, so exercise appropriate What a fun surprise! I'm not really into the vampire thing, but this was a particularly interesting (I thought) view of vampirism from very early in the 20th century. (I don't think it would contain any insights that would be too revelatory for somebody past their 20s, say, but still.) I'm considering using it with a lower-level literature class. It was actually good enough that I went looking for other works by Viereck and discovered (probably on wikipedia on somewhere, so exercise appropriate caution) that he was supposedly considered a great poet by Tesla; this led me to Viereck's poetry, which was such appalling propaganda that I gave up the chase.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tatum

    A subtly gripping psychological thriller which explores what is possibly one of man's greatest fears; the losing of one's mind to another. Personally, I liked that this wasn't just your standard blood-sucking vampire book, I thought the choice to have the vampire be after something different was refreshing and innovative. The style and length makes this an easy enough book to pick up and read, the plot is engaging right to the end and the book has withstood the test of time, something which certa A subtly gripping psychological thriller which explores what is possibly one of man's greatest fears; the losing of one's mind to another. Personally, I liked that this wasn't just your standard blood-sucking vampire book, I thought the choice to have the vampire be after something different was refreshing and innovative. The style and length makes this an easy enough book to pick up and read, the plot is engaging right to the end and the book has withstood the test of time, something which certainly cannot be said for all novels written around the turn of the century. (Available free on Kobo, www.gutenberg.org)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Engel Gatus

    Literally unputdownable, coming from a guy who has no love for vampires. Mr. Sylvester's writing will have you down on your knees, unrelented and focused on his story alone. He has his own, palatable way to be as gripping as some of the modern suspense, thriller writers, such as Dan Brown. Very much a deviated take on an encounter with a vampire.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Charity

    I only got through the first few chapters of this book because it really did not make any sense. There is really no development on the characters and it goes from one subject to the next without following any kind of storyline.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    Better than I expected. I thought the female character (Ethel) was treated with surprising sympathy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Corlene Dorrington

    I really liked the originality of this novella, the depth of ideas discussed by the characters and the deliciously inevitable ending. They just don't write like this anymore, and what a shame.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tbfrank

    Poet, novelist, magazine editor and publisher, and later, pro-German propagandist, George Sylvester Viereck produced this novel in 1907 at age 23. His poetic style was characterized as a form of male love poetry and readers were quick to look for and find similar elements in this novel. Overtones exist but are incidental to the story, serving to illustrate the meaning of friendship and the power - or weakness - of love. The story revolves around Reginald Clarke, a well-regarded literary figure wi Poet, novelist, magazine editor and publisher, and later, pro-German propagandist, George Sylvester Viereck produced this novel in 1907 at age 23. His poetic style was characterized as a form of male love poetry and readers were quick to look for and find similar elements in this novel. Overtones exist but are incidental to the story, serving to illustrate the meaning of friendship and the power - or weakness - of love. The story revolves around Reginald Clarke, a well-regarded literary figure with an inexhaustible supply of fresh ideas; Ernest Fielding, a young writer drawn to Clarke's presence; and Ethel Brandenbourg, Clarke's former lover and painter whose artistic abilities have apparently waned since the two parted. Ernest encounters other artists who indicate their creativity has deserted them after spending time with Clarke, but thinks nothing of it. He tells his best friend Jack of his intention to produce a wonderful play but as time passes, never seems to manage writing any of it down. He is stunned when Clarke produces the very play he has imagined and suffers a nervous breakdown. Hoping to recover, he leaves the city for a time and meets Ethel. He is attracted to her though she is several years older and more mature. Ethel feels sorry for him but remains somewhat aloof. Ernest describes to her a novel he is planning, loosely based on her, and returns to the city. He is overcome by work and an inexplicable lethargy that prevents him from putting the novel on paper. He begins to have dreams of a pale hand picking through his mind, stealing thoughts as they form. Ethel regrets her treatment of Ernest. Worried about him, she visits Ernest at Clarke's home and tries to explain what happened to her and what is happening to him, using the legend of the vampire as an illustration. The story is too fantastic to believe - and yet... Readers of Science Fiction will find the premise familiar, the extraction of thoughts and memories from another's brain, with or without collateral damage. In part, the tale addresses the question where artists, particularly writers, obtain their inspiration. According to Clarke, the most famous writers absorb the best elements of their surroundings, including people. Alternately, Clarke could be seen a metaphor, symbolic of New York sucking the life out of its denizens. Viereck's style, full of poetic descriptions, is firmly set in the 19th century, wordy and stilted. An early exposure of Clarke's power and process undermined an otherwise increasingly suspenseful plot. Focused on three characters, Clarke received the fullest development and that was a result of an extended dialogue with Ethel. Ernest's fascination with Clarke was unsatisfactory as well as his lack of a sense of self-preservation, though the "web" Clarke spun around Ernest explains the young man's behavior to some extent. Ethel's primary purpose is to reveal the truth to Ernest while illuminating Clarke's nature. Plus points for the concept, the villain, and the trap that ensnares the latest victim. Minus for style, pacing, setting, and the penultimate scene when a "hidden door" is suddenly discovered.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Isabella Panzica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting concept but I didn't like its execution. The beginning of the book had very flowery language which made it hard to get through, though after a while the language became more simple. This could be intentional to show off how the more time you spend with the vampire the more talent it steals from you, so the writing goes from complex to simple. Though while I like the idea, I did not like reading the overly complex writing at the beginning. While reading the book I researched the autho Interesting concept but I didn't like its execution. The beginning of the book had very flowery language which made it hard to get through, though after a while the language became more simple. This could be intentional to show off how the more time you spend with the vampire the more talent it steals from you, so the writing goes from complex to simple. Though while I like the idea, I did not like reading the overly complex writing at the beginning. While reading the book I researched the author, which was a mistake since the author was so much more interesting than the book I was reading. He was literally a Nazi propagandist who became a prolific homo-erotica novelist. So whenever I felt bord reading the book I kept on thinking that reading a book on the author would be so much more fun. In this book you can see there were romance and a bit of unrequited love, so this book was probably written during the transition of the author from writing Nazi propaganda to homo-erotica. There could also be an argument about whether or not the protagonist felt either romantic love or friendship-love towards his male friend. Though while I think the author did great in trying to create a parallelism between the writing style and the book, creating a story that would change vampire lore, and having complex characters, I did not like the book. The language at the beginning of the book made it harder to get engaged in the book, the characters were slow to act, and the majority of the action in the book was not interesting. The vampire literally stole ideas and passed them off as his own, it's hard to make that scary. I wanted horror and I got disputes about intellectual property instead. So that is why I am giving the book one star.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessica McDermitt

    There are definitely some very interesting concepts here. I like the idea of a vampire that feeds on thought and artistic genius. Interesting that Shakespeare was heavily implied to have been a vampire, if not a previous incarnation of Reginald Clarke. There were some interesting bits of philosophy, although they got a little dense and were not very artfully inserted. Overall interesting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This is really more of a story of a succubus rather than a vampire, but that honestly makes it more scary as the villain steals the person's essence, his very creative thought, and makes it his own. The ending was very dissatisfying, but the story as a whole is chilling.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katia M. Davis

    For such an early piece on psychic vampirism, this sets the bar. I found it atmospheric, emotive and relatively fast paced (for 1907). It was easy to imagine the mental anguish and terror of the characters. Definitely a good read if you like your vampires more than simply blood-suckers.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kris Kinsella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very good classic horror, with some great undertones. I did not expect the ending we were give though it fit the story wonderfully. The gaslighting and behaviors of Reginald to Ernest made him far scarier and the unspoken true love of Jack/Ernest was touching.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Willoughby

    A 1907 Goth psychic vampire - who feeds off of more than just blood! Energetically inventive and infused with a relish for the supernatural, especially the trappings of the dark. This isn't a book about your traditional bloodsucking vampire, but rather a mental vampire....

  27. 4 out of 5

    LGandT

    I listened to this once before, thought it was alright, but listened to it again and enjoyed it much better the second time around. I loved the setting mostly.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Szendi

    okay. so that happened. It is funny because the book is not even that good? I think. Yet it made me feel many things.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Harry Thompson

    I just could not get in to the writing style. Too fancy talk for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matteo Fulgheri

    So friggin' boring...

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