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Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation (UK edition)

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This is a limited-time free download of chapters 1 and 2 of Digital Disruption. Note: these chapters come from the uncorrected proof of the book. What will digital disruptors do? They'll help you lose weight, then they'll help you decide how to do your hair on a Friday night. They'll make your child's violin lesson really soar. They'll deliver you a morning report of the ti This is a limited-time free download of chapters 1 and 2 of Digital Disruption. Note: these chapters come from the uncorrected proof of the book. What will digital disruptors do? They'll help you lose weight, then they'll help you decide how to do your hair on a Friday night. They'll make your child's violin lesson really soar. They'll deliver you a morning report of the time you spent in REM sleep. They'll help your business learn one hundred times as many insights from its customer database at one-one hundredth the cost. They'll help you treat major illnesses or better yet, they'll watch you 24/7 and identify your risk for illness before you even fall prey to it. They'll help you figure out which Thai restaurant is worth trying out in the same day that they warn you that your teenager took the car to a neighboring town when she should have been in school. Value comes from seeing what customers need and delivering it. Digital disruptors will do all of this at lower cost, with faster development times, and with greater impact on the customer experience than anything that came before. Digital Disruption can be used by anyone in any industry, and implore you to make yourself as ready--as disruptive--as you possibly can be. Why? Because digital disruptors are turning our world--including your industry--upside down. Digital Disruption will guide you to the steps you must take to make your organization as digitally disruptive as the digital disruptors headed straight for you.


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This is a limited-time free download of chapters 1 and 2 of Digital Disruption. Note: these chapters come from the uncorrected proof of the book. What will digital disruptors do? They'll help you lose weight, then they'll help you decide how to do your hair on a Friday night. They'll make your child's violin lesson really soar. They'll deliver you a morning report of the ti This is a limited-time free download of chapters 1 and 2 of Digital Disruption. Note: these chapters come from the uncorrected proof of the book. What will digital disruptors do? They'll help you lose weight, then they'll help you decide how to do your hair on a Friday night. They'll make your child's violin lesson really soar. They'll deliver you a morning report of the time you spent in REM sleep. They'll help your business learn one hundred times as many insights from its customer database at one-one hundredth the cost. They'll help you treat major illnesses or better yet, they'll watch you 24/7 and identify your risk for illness before you even fall prey to it. They'll help you figure out which Thai restaurant is worth trying out in the same day that they warn you that your teenager took the car to a neighboring town when she should have been in school. Value comes from seeing what customers need and delivering it. Digital disruptors will do all of this at lower cost, with faster development times, and with greater impact on the customer experience than anything that came before. Digital Disruption can be used by anyone in any industry, and implore you to make yourself as ready--as disruptive--as you possibly can be. Why? Because digital disruptors are turning our world--including your industry--upside down. Digital Disruption will guide you to the steps you must take to make your organization as digitally disruptive as the digital disruptors headed straight for you.

30 review for Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation (UK edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This book lacks convincing information to support the advice given. The premise is to change your mindset from 'how can we make a new product that we can successfully sell' to 'how can we give people what they really want.' Then cause a digital disruption by making use of free tools or nearly free tools (like mobile app development software) to create digital products (e.g., like app that lets you virtually try on clothing). Iterate on the digital product to add more benefits (like suggest shoes This book lacks convincing information to support the advice given. The premise is to change your mindset from 'how can we make a new product that we can successfully sell' to 'how can we give people what they really want.' Then cause a digital disruption by making use of free tools or nearly free tools (like mobile app development software) to create digital products (e.g., like app that lets you virtually try on clothing). Iterate on the digital product to add more benefits (like suggest shoes to go with the outfit). This is easier said than done. I'm sure many innovators who created digital products that failed had thought people would want their products.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Nothing really surprising here, but good reflections on how to develop products from the perspective of the consumer. I found some of the stories new to me, including the story about how Disney got into mobile games, in the reverse way from what you would expect. The specific guidance for doing this yourself seemed a bit vague, and surprise, the author included links to hire his company for consulting at the end of the book. I usually dislike this and feel a book needs to make up for being an ad Nothing really surprising here, but good reflections on how to develop products from the perspective of the consumer. I found some of the stories new to me, including the story about how Disney got into mobile games, in the reverse way from what you would expect. The specific guidance for doing this yourself seemed a bit vague, and surprise, the author included links to hire his company for consulting at the end of the book. I usually dislike this and feel a book needs to make up for being an advertisement. This one did, in some respects, by including the final chapter of blue-sky predictions of how the world would develop ideas and products in the future.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    How quickly can technology turn a book on Digital Disruption dated? Apparently very quickly. See Kevin Kelly's The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future. How quickly can technology turn a book on Digital Disruption dated? Apparently very quickly. See Kevin Kelly's The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julio Bonilla

    Digital disruptors apply the love of free things to every business decision they make.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike Hales

    Short simple and devastatingly accurate Whatever your business, it’s going to change and you’ll need to change too. This book provides some great stimulus to get you think about how you and your business work. Unless you want to be the next sears or video rental business, start on your lifelong learning and start thinking about what your business looks like in 2-3 years time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tarek Amr

    "Instead of asking How can we make a new product that we can successfully sell? the disruptor asks: How can we give people something they really want". Replace "Make" with "Give", "Product" with "People" and "Sell" with "Want". This sentence summarises the main idea of the book. In digital age, the cost of producing new products is much lower than it was one decade ago. And the author is not only talking about digital products, but analog ones too. Hence, it is all about innovation now. People w "Instead of asking How can we make a new product that we can successfully sell? the disruptor asks: How can we give people something they really want". Replace "Make" with "Give", "Product" with "People" and "Sell" with "Want". This sentence summarises the main idea of the book. In digital age, the cost of producing new products is much lower than it was one decade ago. And the author is not only talking about digital products, but analog ones too. Hence, it is all about innovation now. People want experience rather than products. It doesn't matter if you make it, or if you can partner with others and use free tools to give that experience to your users. Your focus should be on what your users want rather than on what you can produce and sell. The two concepts seem to be similar, but if you think about it, you will find them leading to different set of priorities when you are trying to innovate. The author added later on, "R& D teams have a tendency to confuse product features with customer benefits. They assume that more features equals more benefits. This is not true". One other quote that I liked is, "When companies adopt technology, they do old things in new ways. When companies internalize technology, the find entirely new - disruptive - things to do". He also set some differences between two concepts of innovation. Incremental versus adjacent innovation. Incremental innovations focuses on the the current product you have, the current customers you target, and the current process you use to make your products. Whereas, Adjacent innovation leads you to explore new markets, and new experiences to offer to new users. To do so, you need to think of competition differently, it is not those who sell the same products as you do, but anyone offering good experience to their users. Take Nike Runner app for example, they did not limit themselves to other shoe-makers, they rather explored new areas, they witnessed the likes of Apple and Facebook, they learnt from them how people want to share their activities, and how gamification is invading social services. Nike is not an app maker, it is not part of their production process, but this didn't stop them from moving to one new adjacency to explore new customers and new experiences to offer to those customers. They may choose to partner with Apple or compete against it in order to offer such experience to their users. It doesn't matter whether they choose the former or the latter. Because in the digital disruptive age, what really matter is offering your customer's value not products. Adjacent vs Incremental Innovation in Digital Age

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The increasing digitization of our world has turned the business world upside down. In every industry, some companies are getting closer to their customers and undercutting other competitors. This book gives the details. There are many, many free digital tools available to potential innovators. Next, a digital platform is needed to get it, whatever it is, to the customer as quickly as possible. These are usually very inexpensive. Keep a very close eye on your feedback. For example, if it says tha The increasing digitization of our world has turned the business world upside down. In every industry, some companies are getting closer to their customers and undercutting other competitors. This book gives the details. There are many, many free digital tools available to potential innovators. Next, a digital platform is needed to get it, whatever it is, to the customer as quickly as possible. These are usually very inexpensive. Keep a very close eye on your feedback. For example, if it says that upgrades should move in this direction, instead of that direction, don't wait until next quarter, or even next month, to do the upgrade; start on it today. "Our company is innovative." "Our customers are totally loyal to us." "Our company is un-disruptable." Can you really afford to take such a chance? Companies no longer sell products or services; they sell total product experiences. It starts when a person visits your company online for the first time, and goesall the way until they get the product home and open it. There are ways to measure just how much time a person spends at your website or Facebook page. A company goal might be to get people to spend more time there, instead of simply increasing sales. Don't ask "What new thing can we sell?" Instead, you should ask "What is next thing our customer needs? What adjacent need can we fill that our customer does not even know that they have?" It's tempting to fill any new product or service with benefits for the customer, to be all things to all people. Don't do it. Pick just a couple of the biggest benefits, and concentrate on those. This book is full of examples of how even non-digital experiences like selling shoes can be digitally disrupted. It does a very good job of helping any company to be the disrupter, and not the one being disrupted. It is very much worth reading.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carl Koubek

    Why I read it: Initially, I picked up the book because I could get a free copy through my company. Although Digital Disruption is both thin and anecdotal, it jams in both macro and micro concepts of the ever-changing business landscape. I could mention ten to twenty stories on entrepreneurs leveraging modern tools (Amazon Web Services, Apple’s marketplace, mobile application starter set) to create products with virtually zero upfront costs. Once you filter out the noise of these individual storie Why I read it: Initially, I picked up the book because I could get a free copy through my company. Although Digital Disruption is both thin and anecdotal, it jams in both macro and micro concepts of the ever-changing business landscape. I could mention ten to twenty stories on entrepreneurs leveraging modern tools (Amazon Web Services, Apple’s marketplace, mobile application starter set) to create products with virtually zero upfront costs. Once you filter out the noise of these individual stories, you come to the conclusion that most value-add practices in the modern organization will be either automated or rebuilt altogether. One industry's evolution, book publishing, particularly astonished me. I don’t believe the big organization is obsolete though. I interpreted the book as saying large enterprise companies need to leverage their employees’ intellectual capital to survive, almost an economy of scale for thought leadership. As long as you are hiring the right people and they have an innovative mindset, the larger organization should almost always win the day. Yet as we saw with the US army in The Generals, a staid, orthodox approach can quickly lead to decay in an company. Negatives: Similar to most negative comments I've read on Digital Disruption, I’d say the book uses the micro to prove the macro. While these comparisons may reflect the truth, they also may not. The book also has a very repetitive format as it lays out its individual examples. In this sense, it is almost the same as Chris Berdik’s Mind over Mind. Anecdote, Thesis, Rinse, and Repeat. Who should read this: Anyone with an entrepreneurial mindset or who needs concrete examples of innovation in the 2010s.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam Motes

    Digital disruption builds the case that innovation is in hyper mode today due to the flattened impact of the internet, social apps, free apps and related technologies. A 12 year old today can study on YouTube how to program and get his applications up on the Apple App or Google Play store on his own and impact existing industries and build wealth. This was unthinkable 10 years ago. The geeks of yesteryear could hope to have their app reviewed in a geek magazine to build cred but today they can b Digital disruption builds the case that innovation is in hyper mode today due to the flattened impact of the internet, social apps, free apps and related technologies. A 12 year old today can study on YouTube how to program and get his applications up on the Apple App or Google Play store on his own and impact existing industries and build wealth. This was unthinkable 10 years ago. The geeks of yesteryear could hope to have their app reviewed in a geek magazine to build cred but today they can build an empire. Companies have to embrace this or they will be driven to obscurity from competitors they didn't even know about due to the destroyed barriers of entry to their industry. The idea of using what you know to drive for the adjacent possible to provide the customer what they want next is huge to avoid continuing to invest in your cash cow that maybe close to oblivion or trying to embrace a new industry you don't have expertise in.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marc Sader

    The book revolves around the disruption of the tech industry in the business world. The author lists examples of companies that have started or evolved their business management in a unique way (of course, he only lists the successful ones). The author has a very good way of explaining things and making them simple to understand for those who do not think in a "disruptive" way. I read this book, wanting to learn how an industry can be shaken up in this disruptive era, but there was no "aha" momen The book revolves around the disruption of the tech industry in the business world. The author lists examples of companies that have started or evolved their business management in a unique way (of course, he only lists the successful ones). The author has a very good way of explaining things and making them simple to understand for those who do not think in a "disruptive" way. I read this book, wanting to learn how an industry can be shaken up in this disruptive era, but there was no "aha" moment to me. However, it still put some good ideas in my head. Highly recommended for anyone interested in learning about major disruptors, and how to make use of their way of thinking.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Overall, there are a lot of high-level examples in this book to get you thinking and your creative juices flowing - many times, I found myself saying "that's a neat idea" and would read on; other times, the book seemed to plod along with a few pages of filler. If you're looking for something to possibly kick-start your business or company, and get you thinking about alternative strategies, I believe you will get something out of this book. If you're looking for a guide of "here is how you do it" Overall, there are a lot of high-level examples in this book to get you thinking and your creative juices flowing - many times, I found myself saying "that's a neat idea" and would read on; other times, the book seemed to plod along with a few pages of filler. If you're looking for something to possibly kick-start your business or company, and get you thinking about alternative strategies, I believe you will get something out of this book. If you're looking for a guide of "here is how you do it" to hold you by the hand you will be disappointed. Overall, I would recommend this to people looking for the idea stage as it will get you out of your comfort zone.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I found this book rather intriguing, as it explores the interesting subject of innovation, how to make it happen, and what companies are doing with it. I especially like how McQuivey touches on digitally disruptive platforms and and the infrastructure that companies must put in place in order to foster innovation. This is a great book for those who want to better understand innovation and how it will weave itself through every part of the business landscape in the coming years. Very insightful a I found this book rather intriguing, as it explores the interesting subject of innovation, how to make it happen, and what companies are doing with it. I especially like how McQuivey touches on digitally disruptive platforms and and the infrastructure that companies must put in place in order to foster innovation. This is a great book for those who want to better understand innovation and how it will weave itself through every part of the business landscape in the coming years. Very insightful and well done.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    There were some interesting concepts, but for the most part this just seems written as a promotional tool for forrester research. The tone of "we know better, we can help and you're going to fail without us" kept going for the entire book, so much so that the next steps section at the end was just a list of possible ways to work with forrester. For the same sort of thinking and a better toolset overall, read "the lean startup". You'll get all of the good insights from this and much more, without There were some interesting concepts, but for the most part this just seems written as a promotional tool for forrester research. The tone of "we know better, we can help and you're going to fail without us" kept going for the entire book, so much so that the next steps section at the end was just a list of possible ways to work with forrester. For the same sort of thinking and a better toolset overall, read "the lean startup". You'll get all of the good insights from this and much more, without all of the publicity.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    Interesting, albeit lacking in detail. Many of the assertions I would consider more closely aligned with general entrepreneurship or intrapreneurship. The digital aspect merely accelerates the delivery of a service/product and feedback. Closely monitoring and using all popular communication channels is somewhat a trademark of a successful entrepreneur in the first place, so I am not sure that the fact more and more of it is digital really makes things all that different beyond the rate at which Interesting, albeit lacking in detail. Many of the assertions I would consider more closely aligned with general entrepreneurship or intrapreneurship. The digital aspect merely accelerates the delivery of a service/product and feedback. Closely monitoring and using all popular communication channels is somewhat a trademark of a successful entrepreneur in the first place, so I am not sure that the fact more and more of it is digital really makes things all that different beyond the rate at which happens.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    Not for everybody but certainly for anybody interested in modern business practices. It predicts the way things are changing in the digital age with so many digital tools either free or almost free to just about anybody. No matter how large or small or what industry sector you are in, digital disruption will happen and you need to know how to be a disruptor yourself. As a retired businessman, I was fascinated and found it a great read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Petrea

    What an exciting book! I was delighted and charmed by the stories and concepts--I kept wondering how I could apply those ideas to my own life and work--or those of my children. It makes me excited to look to the future and to see how these disruptors change our lives! A fast read, well written. I cna't recommed it too highly!! What an exciting book! I was delighted and charmed by the stories and concepts--I kept wondering how I could apply those ideas to my own life and work--or those of my children. It makes me excited to look to the future and to see how these disruptors change our lives! A fast read, well written. I cna't recommed it too highly!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeremie Averous

    A good short summary book on what is happening with the Fourth Revolution and how digital disruptors are changing the world we live in. It is a book by Forrester research with a lot of good stories on how digital disruptors can change things from within and from outside established corporations. it just lacks a bit of enthusiasm and practical recommendations to become a digital disruptor.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Blake Kanewischer

    I really enjoyed this book, because it provided a roadmap for thinking about digital disruption and total customer experience design. It made intuitive sense to me as an MIS instructor, and was simple enough that I think a senior undergraduate class could use this as a supplementary text, or a designer could use this as a discussion piece.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kegan

    Very well written book. A field I'm just getting into, and as someone who lives the majority of my life online, it was fascinating for me to see how this will affect the business world. How the two worlds essentially blend together to form something I had not even expected, because I'm in it right now. Inspirational and motivational, well worth the read - even if you're just curious. Very well written book. A field I'm just getting into, and as someone who lives the majority of my life online, it was fascinating for me to see how this will affect the business world. How the two worlds essentially blend together to form something I had not even expected, because I'm in it right now. Inspirational and motivational, well worth the read - even if you're just curious.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashwini

    well written with examples being used frequently for explaining concepts. gives a concise and clear action plan for anyone wanting to start on this journey. it's a no brainer one can't wait any longer. one needs to start now. only thing I did not like is that they had examples even after the book ended. well written with examples being used frequently for explaining concepts. gives a concise and clear action plan for anyone wanting to start on this journey. it's a no brainer one can't wait any longer. one needs to start now. only thing I did not like is that they had examples even after the book ended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hal Danziger

    Great points - most of which we already know, and dragged out through the book. You could probably read just parts 1 and 2 and miss almost nothing. But the reminders are always helpful...especially when coming from an authority.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Juliana

    Quick and good book written by VP and Forrestor analyst James McQuivoy. He primarily serves the CMO audience--and that is primarily the audience for this book. There wasn't a whole lot new for me here--but then I live and breathe tech innovation and am not the primary audience. Quick and good book written by VP and Forrestor analyst James McQuivoy. He primarily serves the CMO audience--and that is primarily the audience for this book. There wasn't a whole lot new for me here--but then I live and breathe tech innovation and am not the primary audience.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    Great read for people who want to think about the current digital consumer and how to adapt what they're working on to innovate in this digital world. I love learning new concepts that are backed up with research and examples, which is exactly what James McQuivey included. Great read for people who want to think about the current digital consumer and how to adapt what they're working on to innovate in this digital world. I love learning new concepts that are backed up with research and examples, which is exactly what James McQuivey included.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bryan House

    started well, but petered out at end with analyst nonsense. like most business books, would have been a very good HBR article, not enough juice to carry a whole book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Allen

    I quit reading this book at 54%. I lost interest.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kam Wa Tang

    Interesting. A couple of great insights and I believe that the author is correct about long term trends; however a little exaggerated in certain sections.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roxanna

    Couldn't finish it, felt like there was nothing new or interesting in what the author was writing about, heard it before via other sources. Couldn't finish it, felt like there was nothing new or interesting in what the author was writing about, heard it before via other sources.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Randall Mckillop

    Great read for all that build and sell products in the digitally driven marketplace. Which is everything.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bry Willis

    Not bad, but not earth-shattering. Tidbits make it worth the effort, but an article might have suited.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marwan

    Very shallow ideas. no evidence on what is meant disruption. trying to convince me that disruption means to have a free product

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