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God's Passion for His Glory: Living the Vision of Jonathan Edwards (with the Complete Text of the End for Which God Created the World)

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In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in him has made all the difference for John Piper-and can transform your life as well. Here Piper passionately demonstrates the relevance of Edwards's ideals for the personal and public lives of Christians today through his own book-length introduction to Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. This book also contains the complete essay supplemented by almost a hundred of Piper's insightful explanatory notes. The result is a powerful and persuasive presentation of the things that matter most in the Christian life.


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In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in In his essay The End for Which God Created the World, the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. Pastor John Piper has devoted his years of ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in him has made all the difference for John Piper-and can transform your life as well. Here Piper passionately demonstrates the relevance of Edwards's ideals for the personal and public lives of Christians today through his own book-length introduction to Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. This book also contains the complete essay supplemented by almost a hundred of Piper's insightful explanatory notes. The result is a powerful and persuasive presentation of the things that matter most in the Christian life.

30 review for God's Passion for His Glory: Living the Vision of Jonathan Edwards (with the Complete Text of the End for Which God Created the World)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Elmer

    This book is actually two books in one. The first half is written by John Piper. Piper’s section intends to introduce the modern reader to one of the greatest works by one of the greatest scholars, Jonathan Edwards’ The End For Which God Created the World. The second section is the complete text of that work. Oftentimes I have a hard time deciding between four or five stars for books I love. In this case, the five star rating was an easy choice. Why five stars? What can an early 18th century the This book is actually two books in one. The first half is written by John Piper. Piper’s section intends to introduce the modern reader to one of the greatest works by one of the greatest scholars, Jonathan Edwards’ The End For Which God Created the World. The second section is the complete text of that work. Oftentimes I have a hard time deciding between four or five stars for books I love. In this case, the five star rating was an easy choice. Why five stars? What can an early 18th century theologian possibly have to say to a 21st century person? As it turns out, a LOT. Many people know only a caricature of Edwards as the gruff, joyless Puritan who preached “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.” While it is true that Edwards preached that sermon, nothing else of the common characterization is true. Jonathan Edwards, one of the greatest minds America ever produced, was a passionate and joyful man who was ardently and single-mindedly committed to the Almighty. In this particular work, Edwards sets out to prove that God’s ultimate end (purpose) in creating the world was His own glory. Moreover, there is no contest between God’s glory and man’s happiness; in fact, they are one and the same thing. Edwards begins proving this through reason, pointing out that as “reason by itself is a defective guide,” it can “help answer objections to revelation.” Later in the work, he uses scripture to thoroughly prove his argument. What I love about this book is that it opened my eyes to see God’s majesty and worthiness in a greater way than before. It filled me with a deeper joy and gratitude than I’d previously known. It has had a profound effect on my worldview and my conception of the Almighty, and for all this I owe a debt to Jonathan Edwards. I highly recommend this book, along with other of Edwards’ writings, and George Marsden’s biography, Jonathan Edwards: A Life.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe Rigney

    One of the best. Why did God create the world? Many Christians would answer (rightly): For the sake of his own glory. But what in the world does that mean? What is "the glory of God"? How should we understand it, and what does it have to do with me? This is Edwards at his philosophical finest, taking head on the intellectual challenges of his day with one eye on the Scriptures and the other on the culture. Don't assume that you understand Edwards' argument the first time through. Meditate, reflect, One of the best. Why did God create the world? Many Christians would answer (rightly): For the sake of his own glory. But what in the world does that mean? What is "the glory of God"? How should we understand it, and what does it have to do with me? This is Edwards at his philosophical finest, taking head on the intellectual challenges of his day with one eye on the Scriptures and the other on the culture. Don't assume that you understand Edwards' argument the first time through. Meditate, reflect, work it over in your mind. This one will repay multiple readings.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ben Chapman

    Two books in one, Piper puts forth great effort to shed light on an Edwards classic, “The End For Which God Created The World”. This book is very important as it points us to the meaning of everything, namely that God created the world and everything in it for His glory. Not an easy read, but very worthy to be looked at carefully and prayerfully. Highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luke Deacon

    Some of Jonathan Edwards' stuff is really hard to read and exhausts your brain, but boy is it worth it! Some of Jonathan Edwards' stuff is really hard to read and exhausts your brain, but boy is it worth it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Marissa

    The first half is John Piper giving a mini-biography of Edwards along with why Edwards wrote. The second half is Edward's "The End for Which God Created the World." It's difficult to read, but good nevertheless. Recommended 11+ The first half is John Piper giving a mini-biography of Edwards along with why Edwards wrote. The second half is Edward's "The End for Which God Created the World." It's difficult to read, but good nevertheless. Recommended 11+

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rod Innis

    I enjoyed this book. Jonathan Edwards is hard to read. John Piper explains him very well!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Jenkins

    I am just not a fan of Piper’s or Edwards’ writing style.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joe Beery

    Revivifying a classic, Piper puts Edwards in context and then lets the revivalist hammer the reader. Excellent.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    Not sure how I lived before reading this

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Short

    Good, but Edwards was a little too much into Necessarianism.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Kearney

    The pinnacle of theology

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Macabasco

    A book that gives an ultimate answer to one of life’s ultimate questions. An excellent work from two great theological minds set apart by centuries. John Piper’s writing is clear and helpful; Jonathan Edwards’ challenging yet completely satisfying. This is worth reading.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Tranmer

    It's difficult to paraphrase a work like this (Piper himself says not to do it which is why he includes the whole text of Edwards' book within his own), but I'll attempt to give my quick two cents with the caveat that you should really read it yourself. No summary will do it justice, certainly not mine. This book is actually 2 books. The first half is John Piper's personal testimony about how Jonathan Edwards writing has influenced Piper's view of God and his own ministry emphasis, followed by a It's difficult to paraphrase a work like this (Piper himself says not to do it which is why he includes the whole text of Edwards' book within his own), but I'll attempt to give my quick two cents with the caveat that you should really read it yourself. No summary will do it justice, certainly not mine. This book is actually 2 books. The first half is John Piper's personal testimony about how Jonathan Edwards writing has influenced Piper's view of God and his own ministry emphasis, followed by a brief biography of Edwards' life and work. The second half of the book is the full text of Edwards' "The End for Which God Created the World," with some editorial help from Piper who takes what would surely be an almost insurmountable Everest and breaks it up into more digestible sections with summary headings. I know I wouldn't have persevered through Edwards' text without Piper's help. He really did succeed in making a lofty masterpiece more accessible. Edward's book is in two sections as well. The first tackles the philosophical questions. The second relies on Scripture to make his same points... all in answer to that one question, "What was the ultimate end for which God created the universe?" The answer, in brief, is "the glory of God." But the answer is not where the magic happens. It's his amazing defense of the statement that is the weight of the volume. If you've struggled, as I have, with the concept of the glory of God, he will likely hit on most every specific question you've had. What is it? Why is it? What is our responsibility? Why does God demand the it? What does that say about God? What does that say about us? Does it all make sense? Does it feel right? Is it true? Does it make sense philosophically? Does is make sense through what we have of divine revelation through Scripture? It's a painstakingly exacting work, tedious at times, and absolutely breathtakingly profound in others. Piper describes Edwards like this: "Those who have climbed highest see more clearly than those in the cloudy regions below how much higher the reaches of the mountains of God really are. Below we talk about mystery because we cannot see the clouds. Above the clouds Edwards talks of mystery because the peaks of divinity stretch out into space without end." So basically, Edwards is profound. He was someone who saw "above the clouds" and makes you think things you've probably never thought before. Even so, on a personal note, I was comforted. Understanding and accepting all the emphasis on and references to the "glory of God" is something I struggled with for years. Why? Why does God want the glory? Doesn't that makes God seem arrogant? Somehow needy and dependent on his own creation? Wouldn't a perfect God be more humble? As sacrilegious as those sorts of thoughts seem, I believe God always wants us to be humbly honest in our questionings. We are told to ask, seek, knock. As I've read the Scriptures over the years, he has answered my questions, not in a philosophical way that might win a battle of words and wits, but simply with the truth of who He is in the pages of Scripture. He has comforted my soul through my own search in the Word. The answers given by Edwards resonated with the conclusions I had already come to in my own mind, clarifying and defining and defending them. The comfort was in knowing that, even as someone lacking the brilliant mind of a Jonathan Edwards, God can still speak His truth to me through His Word with the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. "He will teach you all things." I may not learn all things in this life, but I do appreciate how this book has revealed a little more of this profound and elegant mystery to my seeking heart and questioning mind. My summary might be... God's Glory is for our good. Our good is for God's glory. In the words of Edwards... "The happiness of the creature consists in rejoicing in God, by which God is also magnified and exalted." "The chief and ultimate end of the Supreme Being in the worlds of creation and providence was the manifestation of his own glory in the highest happiness of his creatures." In the words of Piper... "God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him." "The chief end of man is to glorify God by enjoying Him forever."

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Castleton

    This is an outstanding guided-tour of one of Edwards most influential works. It is a difficult book, not because the issues are not clearly outlined either by Mr. Edwards or Piper--rather the closer one approaches the mind and purposes of God, the more different from Him we realize we are. Nevertheless, this is a supremely important book to read. One that will radically reshape your understanding regarding the end to which God created the world. One of the greatest blessings of this book is the re This is an outstanding guided-tour of one of Edwards most influential works. It is a difficult book, not because the issues are not clearly outlined either by Mr. Edwards or Piper--rather the closer one approaches the mind and purposes of God, the more different from Him we realize we are. Nevertheless, this is a supremely important book to read. One that will radically reshape your understanding regarding the end to which God created the world. One of the greatest blessings of this book is the realization that God's glory and our happiness are not two considerations but one. God's glory is our joy because His virtue is our greatest good. God wants nothing less than His creatures to enjoy what He most enjoys about Himself. What a loving, gracious, and merciful God we have.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Coyle

    Edwards is generally difficult to read and not something I would recommend for beginners (other than selections from his sermons). Having said that, this little volume is a great place to start. "The End for which God Created the World" is ultimate Edwards, while more famous works like "Freedom of the Will" and "Religious Affections" are penultimate. Piper's introductory remarks and footnotes help make the text more understandable, and the way he's broken up the text and given it paragraph numbe Edwards is generally difficult to read and not something I would recommend for beginners (other than selections from his sermons). Having said that, this little volume is a great place to start. "The End for which God Created the World" is ultimate Edwards, while more famous works like "Freedom of the Will" and "Religious Affections" are penultimate. Piper's introductory remarks and footnotes help make the text more understandable, and the way he's broken up the text and given it paragraph numbers and introductory headings make the whole work easier than the old compressed versions. Some quotes from the book: "God, in glorifying the saints in heaven with eternal felicity, aims to satisfy his infinite grace or benelovence, by the bestowment of a good infintely valuable, because eternal; and yet there never will come the moment, when it can be said, that now this infinitely valuable good has been actually bestowed." [Translation: "heaven is a place where happiness increases for all of eternity", Sam Storms has an amazing lecture on this on the Desiring God website.] "The most true excellent knowledge of God is the knowledge of his glory or moral excellence, and the most excellent exercise of the will consists in esteem and love, and a delight in his glory." "God is glorified not only by His glory's being seen, but by its being rejoiced in. When those that see it delight in it, God is more glorified than if they only see it. His glory is then received by the whole soul, both by the understanding and by the heart. God made the world that He might communicate, and the creature receive, His glory; and that it might [be:] receieved both by the mind and heart." [Piper quoting Edwards' Miscellanies in the Introduction:]

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    As usuall John Piper's passion for the excellency of God is contagious and refreshing. He does not write to add to the word of God but to share his understanding and deep study of the scriptures that an ordinary person like me may not be able to grasp. However, he uses scripture to verify what he writes. The Glory of God, to the Glory of God, etc is used so many times that maybe just maybe we have become to familiar without realizing the deep meaning, the beauty and the goodness of Glory to God. As usuall John Piper's passion for the excellency of God is contagious and refreshing. He does not write to add to the word of God but to share his understanding and deep study of the scriptures that an ordinary person like me may not be able to grasp. However, he uses scripture to verify what he writes. The Glory of God, to the Glory of God, etc is used so many times that maybe just maybe we have become to familiar without realizing the deep meaning, the beauty and the goodness of Glory to God. Reading this book, I soon realized that this phrase is in the word of God quite frequently and his namesake. The Glory of God in a christian's life is satisfaction in his attibutes, who He is, and what he is doing. We as Christians are his namesake. That has so many implications and it should transform our lives if we understood and thought what it means and that it should be our greatest treasure. I hope that I am able to always keep that in my mind constantly and guard that treasure with all that I say or do. Great examples of verses used for his namesake Isaiah 48:9...For my name's sake will I defer mine anger, and for my praise will I refrain for thee....for mine own sake, even for mine own sake will I do it; for how should my name be polluted? And I will not give my glory unto another. This verse alone for me shows the urgency of his Glory and his namesake. Not because God is has an ego but for our sakes and our joy. Another misconception and one that I am seeking to understand is the holiness of God...God's holiness is the communication of the love of Himself. That in itself is one reason to embrace the holiness of God, to seek the holiness of God and to always keep it front and center.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Tomes

    End of Creation is a brilliant work. And yet, Edwards seems to have missed a huge opportunity in developing his thesis against the background of the person and work of Christ. Jesus, in his human nature, perfectly remanates the internal, emanating glory of God, while simultaneously emanating that same glory into the theater of God's grace, according to his divine nature. If God's ultimate end in creation is the emanation of his internal glory in creation, then the outworking of his purpose in th End of Creation is a brilliant work. And yet, Edwards seems to have missed a huge opportunity in developing his thesis against the background of the person and work of Christ. Jesus, in his human nature, perfectly remanates the internal, emanating glory of God, while simultaneously emanating that same glory into the theater of God's grace, according to his divine nature. If God's ultimate end in creation is the emanation of his internal glory in creation, then the outworking of his purpose in the incarnation is central to achieving this end. Jesus perfectly remanates God's internal glory in the incarnation. He shares essentially in God's internal glory AND he receives the fullness of the emanation of that internal glory in his human nature, after the manner of creatures. Jesus, in his human nature, is the fullest expression of the emanation of God's internal glory (Heb. 1:2 and Col. 1:15-20 in the light of Edwards's thesis). Knowing Jesus is the only way that fallen creatures can remanate (this really should be in the english dictionary) God's emanated glory. Edwards's thesis has significant ramifications for the Christian life, especially when connected to the doctrine of union with Christ. It is no wonder that John Piper keeps writing books about the exact same thing. On the other hand, if someone reads this work and thinks that they can have an unmediated experience with God's emanated glory, then that isn't Edwards's fault. It belongs more to their location in contemporary evangelicalism.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Esther Louw

    I didn't read this book all the way to the end, although I read a large portion of it. Very disappointing. Having heard many favorable things about both John Piper and Jonathan Edwards, I hoped that this book would be profound and insightful. Instead it was steeped in Neo-platonic philosophy and panentheistic thought. Some quotes that demonstrate this thinking are below: "The emanation [of his own infinite fullness] was what excited God to create the world" "If existence is more worthy than defect I didn't read this book all the way to the end, although I read a large portion of it. Very disappointing. Having heard many favorable things about both John Piper and Jonathan Edwards, I hoped that this book would be profound and insightful. Instead it was steeped in Neo-platonic philosophy and panentheistic thought. Some quotes that demonstrate this thinking are below: "The emanation [of his own infinite fullness] was what excited God to create the world" "If existence is more worthy than defect and non-entity, and if any created existence is in itself worthy to be, then knowledge is; and if any knowledge, then the most excellent sort of knowledge, that of God and his glory. This knowledge is one of the highest, most real, and substantial parts of all created existence, most remote from non-entity and defect" In other words, the basic premise of this book and which the above quotes hint at, is that God loves people because they are emanations of himself. Because there is no higher order of being than God, there is nothing that God can properly delight himself in without becoming dependent on that being or substance and hence, as the result of dependance, less-perfect and less divine. The underlying assumptions of God's character and nature are, in my opinion, unbiblical and not worth the time exploring further.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James Ritchie

    In essence this book is actually a republication of Jonathan Edwards book ‘The End For Which God Created the World’ with a hundred page extended introduction by Piper. In the introduction Piper covers a range of topics related to Edwards and how his God-centred theology and vision has impacted society. Of particular interest to me (due to a sermon series I am preparing) was a chapter on the need for God-centred thinking and living today – especially after the enlightenment period in the 19th cen In essence this book is actually a republication of Jonathan Edwards book ‘The End For Which God Created the World’ with a hundred page extended introduction by Piper. In the introduction Piper covers a range of topics related to Edwards and how his God-centred theology and vision has impacted society. Of particular interest to me (due to a sermon series I am preparing) was a chapter on the need for God-centred thinking and living today – especially after the enlightenment period in the 19th century, that scoffed at centrality and value of God. He asserts that with the growth in technology and industry and the accompanying growth in confidence in the ability of man there was a real shift away a God-centred perspective. This happened both in the western world/ culture and also in the Church. I thought that Piper’s point (although quite obvious) was very well made. As I read works like Edwards it is evident that there has been, in some real ways, a shift away from a theocentric worldview in the church and beyond. So that things like a reverent concern for God, an awe at his profoundness and an absolute dependence on his sovereignty almost seem out of place and alien, even in the church.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This two-part book consisting of Piper's commentary on Edwards' life and theology, and the classic edition of Edwards thesis on "The End for which God Created the World" is a wonderful edition for any reader who longs to catch a glimpse of the glory of God and the satisfaction and joy we have therein. This book will open you to the comfort of realizing that the most joy-giving, people-saving, universe-fulfilling, phenomenon is God receiving glory. Because God is passionately accomplishing His o This two-part book consisting of Piper's commentary on Edwards' life and theology, and the classic edition of Edwards thesis on "The End for which God Created the World" is a wonderful edition for any reader who longs to catch a glimpse of the glory of God and the satisfaction and joy we have therein. This book will open you to the comfort of realizing that the most joy-giving, people-saving, universe-fulfilling, phenomenon is God receiving glory. Because God is passionately accomplishing His own glory, it overflows into us giving us joy and enabling us to join Him in that pursuit. Edwards main point is that God's primary passion is for His own glory. God's passion for His own glory is not a sinfully selfish motivation, but it is the natural function of His deity. Furthermore, creation, humanity, and God's people all find their meaning in bringing God glory. Though it was written during the age of the Enlightenment, it offers a healthy challenge to rationalism and finds its foundation in Scripture's witness. Edwards treatise is fully biblical, drawing from almost every book in the canon. I highly recommend!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Short

    This is really two books in one. The second part is Jonathan Edward's work, The End for Which God Created the World. The first part is John Piper's thoughts, experiences, analysis, and explanation of Edwards' work. The Edwards text is dense and should be read carefully. They have preserved the text but added some things, such as paragraph numbers, headings, definitions, and footnotes. These editorial additions serve to make the text more readable. Edwards labors some in the first part of his trea This is really two books in one. The second part is Jonathan Edward's work, The End for Which God Created the World. The first part is John Piper's thoughts, experiences, analysis, and explanation of Edwards' work. The Edwards text is dense and should be read carefully. They have preserved the text but added some things, such as paragraph numbers, headings, definitions, and footnotes. These editorial additions serve to make the text more readable. Edwards labors some in the first part of his treatise where he pushes out his reasoning to conclusions. The latter part of his work turns more to the Scripture for foundation and is frankly easier to follow. Edwards first part is important, but the second part is the real meat. It is worth the labor for the section near the end where he gives the scriptural scope and meaning of God's glory. Piper's introductory work helps us understand Edwards more quickly and fully, particularly if you are not familiar with Edwards or with working through such dense material. This is not light reading. It is substantial and weighty, but it will pay dividends again and again in your life. I recommend it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Publisher's Description: "This is a stunning truth: namely, that God's passion for his glory is the measure of his commitment to our joy. In his essay, "The End for Which God Created the World," the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. John Piper has devoted the past thirty years of his ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that Publisher's Description: "This is a stunning truth: namely, that God's passion for his glory is the measure of his commitment to our joy. In his essay, "The End for Which God Created the World," the great theologian Jonathan Edwards proclaimed that God's ultimate end is the manifestation of his glory in the highest happiness of his creatures. John Piper has devoted the past thirty years of his ministry to exploring the implications of this stunning truth for life and ministry. Understanding that God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in him, has made all the difference for John Piper and can transform your life as well. Here Piper passionately demonstrates the relevance of Edwards' ideals for the personal and public life of modern evangelicals through his own book-length introduction to Edwards' incomparable essay, and the inclusion of that original, unabridged work. The result is a powerful and persuasive presentation of the things that matter most in the Christian life."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hanlie Wessels

    As noted, this book is two books in one. The second book, the Jonathan Edwards one, is excellent. Heavy reading, but excellent. The first book is John Piper waxing eloquent about how much he loves Jonathan Edwards. It was quite annoying. I felt that he needed an editor. His ranting could have been reduced by at least half. A lot of it is completely irrelevant. The parts about Jonathan Edward's life was nice. As to his advice: for some unfathomable reason John Piper recommends you read the second pa As noted, this book is two books in one. The second book, the Jonathan Edwards one, is excellent. Heavy reading, but excellent. The first book is John Piper waxing eloquent about how much he loves Jonathan Edwards. It was quite annoying. I felt that he needed an editor. His ranting could have been reduced by at least half. A lot of it is completely irrelevant. The parts about Jonathan Edward's life was nice. As to his advice: for some unfathomable reason John Piper recommends you read the second part of the "real" book first. This is a terrible idea. The Jonathan Edwards book is a beautifully constructed logical argument. WHY in the world would you start reading an argument in the middle, read to the end and then go back and read the beginning??! It's very silly. If you are going to buy this book I'd recommend buying just the Edwards book. It's probably available as a free download. If you like this cover, read only the chapter about Edward's history and then read the Jonathan Edwards book in the proper order.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve Alde

    I have read this book (The End for Which God Created the World) two times and have started to read it for the third. This book has had more influence on my life than most others (outside of the Bible and D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones). Jonathan Edwards brings out the centrality of God in all things and the purpose of God in creating all things - that God would be glorified by being seen, reverenced, rejoiced in, and loved. John Piper's explanation of the book and its influence upon his life (the first h I have read this book (The End for Which God Created the World) two times and have started to read it for the third. This book has had more influence on my life than most others (outside of the Bible and D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones). Jonathan Edwards brings out the centrality of God in all things and the purpose of God in creating all things - that God would be glorified by being seen, reverenced, rejoiced in, and loved. John Piper's explanation of the book and its influence upon his life (the first half of this book) is very helpful. Piper's footnotes in the section of the book containing Edwards' "The End for Which God Created the World" help the reader understand Edwards' flow of thought (which is deeper than most 21st century people are used to) and terminology (which is from the 18th century). I recommend this book very highly for any who want to understand the ultimate purpose of God in creating the universe and us in it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt Crawford

    This is about what you would expect from both writers. I have to say both writers because the first portion is John Piper speaking about the significant influence that Jonathan Edwards had on his life. The second half is the book of Edwards that had such an impact, The End for which God Created the World. Its not a big secret, its God's Glory! The reformed answer to why God does everything. Piper speaks of how it changed his entire theological basis. Edwards speaks about how God's glory in creat This is about what you would expect from both writers. I have to say both writers because the first portion is John Piper speaking about the significant influence that Jonathan Edwards had on his life. The second half is the book of Edwards that had such an impact, The End for which God Created the World. Its not a big secret, its God's Glory! The reformed answer to why God does everything. Piper speaks of how it changed his entire theological basis. Edwards speaks about how God's glory in creation (and everything that follows), fulfill the entire narrative about redemptive history. The end, or teleos or goal, of what God does is to create communion between man and God. There is more biblical theology than is many of Edwards writings and less emphasis on reason or sensibility, but it is still there.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Collins

    The great value of this book is the complete text of Jonathan Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. Edwards defends the logical coherence of and proves with copious examination of Scripture the thesis that the end for which God created the world was the exhibition of his glory so that he might receive back from the creatures praise and glory. This edition is nicely printed and provides helpful explanatory footnotes by Piper. The philosophical section can be difficult reading, but th The great value of this book is the complete text of Jonathan Edwards's The End for Which God Created the World. Edwards defends the logical coherence of and proves with copious examination of Scripture the thesis that the end for which God created the world was the exhibition of his glory so that he might receive back from the creatures praise and glory. This edition is nicely printed and provides helpful explanatory footnotes by Piper. The philosophical section can be difficult reading, but the scriptural section often verges into devotional exaltation. The introductory essays by Piper may be read of skipped depending on the reader's interest in Piper's evaluation of modern evangelicalism and his interest in Piper's own history of reading Edwards.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jake Jordan

    One of the best of Piper's writings. Why did God create the world? Many Christians would answer (rightly): For the sake of his own glory. But what in the world does that mean? What is "the glory of God"? How should we understand it, and what does it have to do with me? This is Edwards at his philosophical finest, taking head on the intellectual challenges of the day with one eye on the Scriptures and the other on the culture. And if you are brave and can work through the 2nd half, then you can glea One of the best of Piper's writings. Why did God create the world? Many Christians would answer (rightly): For the sake of his own glory. But what in the world does that mean? What is "the glory of God"? How should we understand it, and what does it have to do with me? This is Edwards at his philosophical finest, taking head on the intellectual challenges of the day with one eye on the Scriptures and the other on the culture. And if you are brave and can work through the 2nd half, then you can glean some amazing insight from a deeply committed man Jonathan Edwards. Update: I have read this book 3 times now, and it continues to unfold new truths for me!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    This is a great introduction into the works of Jonathan Edwards. John Piper uses the first part of the book to introduce key aspects of Edwards' thought and theology and publishes the entire text of "The End for which God Created the Word" in the latter part of the book. I found this book to be paradigm-shattering, mind-blowing, and heart-warming. Wrapping my head around the argumentation which Edwards uses was rather difficult at first, but once I had a handle on his vocabulary and punctuation p This is a great introduction into the works of Jonathan Edwards. John Piper uses the first part of the book to introduce key aspects of Edwards' thought and theology and publishes the entire text of "The End for which God Created the Word" in the latter part of the book. I found this book to be paradigm-shattering, mind-blowing, and heart-warming. Wrapping my head around the argumentation which Edwards uses was rather difficult at first, but once I had a handle on his vocabulary and punctuation practices, I was impressed with every page. Every student of theology should read this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    John Piper going through his encounter within the theology of Jonathan Edwards. This book includes the entire essay written by Edwards called "The end for which God created the world". This book was very insightful into what Edwards thought about God and his reasoning for doing things they way he (God)did. There is a lot of philosophical stuff here that could be over the head of a new believer. I rememeber being so blown away by this book. They don't build em like Edwards any more. Sigh! John Piper going through his encounter within the theology of Jonathan Edwards. This book includes the entire essay written by Edwards called "The end for which God created the world". This book was very insightful into what Edwards thought about God and his reasoning for doing things they way he (God)did. There is a lot of philosophical stuff here that could be over the head of a new believer. I rememeber being so blown away by this book. They don't build em like Edwards any more. Sigh!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bob Ladwig

    I think this essay by Edwards is probably one of the most brilliant theological works ever written, I don't say that often, in fact I think it is the only time I have said it in any book review. the Piperian "Christian hedonism" is really derived from this doctrine of the God centeredness of God. The first half of this book is Piper's intro and explanation of Edwards in modern language, the second half is Edwards unfiltered. This truly is an amazing work, and Edwards was without question the mos I think this essay by Edwards is probably one of the most brilliant theological works ever written, I don't say that often, in fact I think it is the only time I have said it in any book review. the Piperian "Christian hedonism" is really derived from this doctrine of the God centeredness of God. The first half of this book is Piper's intro and explanation of Edwards in modern language, the second half is Edwards unfiltered. This truly is an amazing work, and Edwards was without question the most brilliant theological/philosophic mind produced on American soil to date.

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