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The Trouble Makers: Dissent Over Foreign Policy, 1792-1939 (Pelican)

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Of his own titles this was A.J.P. Taylor's favourite. It is not hard to see why. The title alone provides a strong clue. He would always have an affinity with those engaged in such an activity. Derived from the Ford Lectures of 1956, A.J.P. Taylor in six vivid chapters examines Dissent over British Foreign Policy between 1792 and 1939. In his own words 'it is much the most Of his own titles this was A.J.P. Taylor's favourite. It is not hard to see why. The title alone provides a strong clue. He would always have an affinity with those engaged in such an activity. Derived from the Ford Lectures of 1956, A.J.P. Taylor in six vivid chapters examines Dissent over British Foreign Policy between 1792 and 1939. In his own words 'it is much the most exciting and interesting book I have written'.


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Of his own titles this was A.J.P. Taylor's favourite. It is not hard to see why. The title alone provides a strong clue. He would always have an affinity with those engaged in such an activity. Derived from the Ford Lectures of 1956, A.J.P. Taylor in six vivid chapters examines Dissent over British Foreign Policy between 1792 and 1939. In his own words 'it is much the most Of his own titles this was A.J.P. Taylor's favourite. It is not hard to see why. The title alone provides a strong clue. He would always have an affinity with those engaged in such an activity. Derived from the Ford Lectures of 1956, A.J.P. Taylor in six vivid chapters examines Dissent over British Foreign Policy between 1792 and 1939. In his own words 'it is much the most exciting and interesting book I have written'.

44 review for The Trouble Makers: Dissent Over Foreign Policy, 1792-1939 (Pelican)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ali Khosravi

    The book explores the well established tradition of dessent in Britain against the 'official' foreign policy of the day from the haydayds of the empire (and even before) with dessenters like George Fox (who like the modern Liam Fox was Eurosceptic) to the inter-war years, the league of nations, appeasement, the primitive labour party and characters like Ramsay McDonald and Arthur Henderson. Such dessenters were rarely questioned (if ever) in terms of their patriotism and their 'love of the land' The book explores the well established tradition of dessent in Britain against the 'official' foreign policy of the day from the haydayds of the empire (and even before) with dessenters like George Fox (who like the modern Liam Fox was Eurosceptic) to the inter-war years, the league of nations, appeasement, the primitive labour party and characters like Ramsay McDonald and Arthur Henderson. Such dessenters were rarely questioned (if ever) in terms of their patriotism and their 'love of the land' by either the press or the public. In fact, they argued that they 'loved England way too much to allow her to be involved in conflicts abroad'. I couldn't help but thinking of the modern day dessenter, Jeremy Corbyn, who is shunned by the tabloid press as an 'unpatriotic' enemy of Britain, simply for following a such long-established British tradition of free thought and non-conformism. The text can be a bit heavy going at times (for the modern reader), but that only shows Taylor's authority over the subject and his mastery of the English language. He described Imperialism as "the bastard child of radicalism" as he explains that many 'well-meaning' radical dessenters like William Gladstone, had a isloationist/non-interventionist appraoch to their continental neighbours (rather like the modern day Brexiteers and their obsession with emerging markets) and wanted to colonise more 'savage' lands beyond Europe. Such radicals were often driven by a strong Christian mission of promoting the Anglican religion of love at gun point by invasion of other countries (e.g. Egypt in 1882). This paradox of goodness of intentions yet not so good outcomes, reminds the reader of Bush and Blair's Christian mission of democratising Iraq and Afghanistan, an allegedly 'noble' mission which ended up in tatters. There can also be parallels drawn between Lloyd George's disregard for Parliament and obsession with popular opinion (which often meant the opinions of press barons stretched on front pages) and Tony Blair's disregard for Cabinet and obssession with the public image and inevitable pact with the devil that is Rupert Murdoch.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Hunt

    History and political analysis as it should be written. Witty, insightful and illuminating and revealing areas of foreign policy that I had never previously considered. Not quite counter-factual but constantly fulfilling. A joy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    OK. Just scan-read: this was still on my shelf from my politics degrees, and while I'm sure it's great, my interests have now moved on. OK. Just scan-read: this was still on my shelf from my politics degrees, and while I'm sure it's great, my interests have now moved on.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Derek Shouba

    This is a quirky little book on British foreign policy dissent. AJP Taylor was a master of diplomatic history and a very witty and often funny writer.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sean MacGuffin

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Egan

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    Simon Wood

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    Toby

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    Richard Thomas

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    Matthew Stevenson

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul Dvorak

  13. 4 out of 5

    Suzi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allan

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    Virgil

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Raper

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jim Williams

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leon Argamasilla

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gareth

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zach Vaughn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Besada

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fabio

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Cairns

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    Toby Paterson

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    Emma

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    Peter

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  30. 5 out of 5

    Edvard

  31. 5 out of 5

    Begumy

  32. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  33. 4 out of 5

    Dana

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    Theresa

  35. 5 out of 5

    Eric

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    Erika

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    Andrew Schirmer

  38. 4 out of 5

    Neil Jensen

  39. 4 out of 5

    John Halloran

  40. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Koch

  41. 5 out of 5

    Shelalyn Rada

  42. 4 out of 5

    Tom Blackburn

  43. 5 out of 5

    tom bomp

  44. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Brown

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